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Journeys Through Jackson 2017 Vol.27 No.02

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  • Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. The journal began as a monthly publication in July 1991, was published bimonthly from 1994 to 2003, and continues today as a quarterly publication. The journal issues in this digital collection are presented as annual compilations.
  • Journeys Through Jackson The Official Journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. Vol. XXVII, No. II Spring/ Summer 2017 JACKSON COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, INC. 2017 Officers Presiden ................................................................................................................... Lynn Hotaling Vice Presidents ............................................................... Norma Bryson Clayton, George Frizzell Secretary ................................................................................................................. Deborah Blazer Treasurer ..................................................................................................... Teresa Deitz Manring Librarian...................................................................................................................... Marie Clark Office Manager ......................................................................................................... Carol Bryson Web Master, Computer Technician .................................................................... Jason N. Gregory Chair, Publications (Editor) ........................................................................... Sanji Talley Watson Journeys Through Jackson is the official publication of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. Members and non-members are invited to submit genealogical materials for publication, with the understanding that the editor reserves the right to edit these materials for genealogical content, clarity, or taste. The Society assumes no responsibility for errors of fact that may be contained in submissions, and except where noted, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor or of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. The Society accepts no advertising for this publication except for notices from other non-profit groups. From the Editor Don’t forget that every second Thursday of the month, the Society offers great programs on a wide variety of topics. As always, they are open to the public and are free. Pass the word regarding our programs. Always remember that our Society is as good as its members. If you have any pictures, stories or tidbits of information that you would like to share with everyone, please feel free to send it to the Society for publication in Journeys. REMEMBER The Rebel Cruise – In Sunday October 1, 2017 1 – 4 pm Sav-Mor Parking Lot Sylva, NC T-Shirts – Music – Food Trucks – 50/50 Raffle Classic Cars, Muscle Cars & Rat Rods Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 49 Table of Contents Table of Contents .............................................................................................................49 JCGS Photo Album.................................................................................................... 50-54 Dr. John R. Brinkley ................................................................................................. 55-64 1880 Jackson County Census Records ..................................................................... 65-68 Descendants of William Solomon Parker, Sr .......................................................... 69-72 Jackson County Genealogical Society Scholarship Winners ................................. 73-76 Descendants of John Thomas Tatham ..................................................................... 77-80 1944 Jackson County Death Certificates ................................................................. 81-83 The Oldest House in Jackson County ............................................................................84 Outline Descendant Report for Frederick (Baumgarten) Bumgarner. ................ 85-88 Gunter-Gooch From Jackson County to Idaho and Utah ..................................... 89-90 Denton Higdon Photo Album .................................................................................... 91-94 Index ............................................................................................................................ 95-96 The address for JCGS is now: Jackson County Genealogical Society Post Office Box 480 Sylva, NC 28779 In the Fall 2016 Issue of JTJ, we made a mistake in the transcription of one of the articles. We are human and all articles are edited for clarity, legibility, proper formatting. Here is the corrected paragraph that should be on page 185 in the Fall 2016 issue. “We have known her all her life until the removal of herself and husband to Tennessee and that we firmly state that she is a woman of good character never having known of or heard of anything whatever derogatory to her character for virtue, charity, honesty, and sobriety and we further state that her father and family for a great many years were close neighbors only residing a short distance from us. Given under our hands this 19th day of August A. D. 1870.” Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 50 JCGS Photo Album The pictures shown here was given to the Society by JCGS member, Bonnie Barker. Above left is a picture of John Robert Mills, taken at the old home place on Moses Creek. Above is Mitchell Melton, Pernell Griggs, and John Robert Mills taken at the Melton home in Little Canada. The photograph on the left is of John Robert Mills and Finley Mills. Recent research on this family reminded us that we had these pictures in the Bonnie Barker Collection. Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 51 JCGS Photo Album The photo above is of John Robert and Flora Arrington Mills family; included in this photo is Zeb Mills, Findly Mills, Mariah Etta Mills, Nellie Ann Mills, Ferry Mills and Winnie Mills. The photo on the bottom is also John Robert and Flora Arrington Mills family. With them in this photo are Nina Arrington, Ferry Mills, Mariah Mills, Nell Mills. These two photos were also part of the Bonnie Barker Collection located in the JCGS Library. Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 52 JCGS Photo Album Recently, there was a discussion in the JCGS office as to if the gentlemen in these two pictures are the same man. The photo to the top is a known photo of William Hamilton Bryson, (11 Nov 1832 – 18 Sep 1875), he was the son of William Holmes Bryson and Magdalene Cunningham. If anyone can identify the gentleman to the left, please let the society know his identity. Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 53 JCGS Photo Album In the JSGC Library, we have been very fortunate to have been given numerous old photographs. On the next two pages are some of the photographs that are unidentified. If you happen to know who any of these people are, please contact the office and let us know their identity. Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 54 JCGS Photo Album Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 55 Dr. John Brinkley By Lynn Hotaling and George Frizzell. This article will continue in future editions of JTJ. Seventy-five years after his death, the man who is likely Jackson County’s most notorious native son is once again in the national spotlight. Dr. John R. Brinkley, born July 8, 1885, in Beta, was raised alongside the Tuckaseigee River by his aunt, Sally Mingus. He left Sylva penniless but found fame and fortune during the 1920s and 1930s after he hit upon the idea of treating male impotence by transplanting goat glands into humans, performing hundreds of surgeries in hospitals he founded in Milford, Kan., Del Rio, Texas, and Little Rock, Ark. After Kansas authorities stripped him of his medical license in 1930, he built a new hospital in Del Rio, where he also constructed the world’s most powerful radio station across the Rio Grande River in Mexico, out of reach of U.S. regulation. He hosted a program introduced country music luminaries like the Carter family and local talent like Samantha Biddix Bumgarner and Harry Cagle to a national audience. Brinkley ended his career in bankruptcy court and died a broken man in 1942, but along the way he revolutionized political campaigning by introducing radio advertising, sound trucks and airplane travel during his 1930 write-in attempt to win the Kansas governorship. Though not initially taken seriously as a candidate, Brinkley attracted such huge crowds traveling the state in his airplane that state officials – just three days before the election – changed the voting rules. The only ballots that would count, they said, were ones that read “J.R. Brinkley.” With no time to protest, Brinkley got on the radio and reminded Kansans non-stop that they needed to write “J period R period B-R-I-N-K-L-E-Y,” and that no other spelling would do. When votes were tallied, Brinkley had 183,278, not counting the estimated 30,000 to 50,000 ballots with “Doctor Brinkley” or other variations. His two opponents’ totals were 217,171 and 216,920, which means Brinkley likely would have won had the old standard of voter intent remained in force. That insight into the 1930 election can be found in a 2008 Brinkley biography, “Charlatan: America’s Most Dangerous Huckster, the Man Who Pursued Him, and the Age of Flimflam” by Pope Brock. Since Brock’s book was published, interest in Brinkley has steadily increased. A documentary titled “Nuts!” was screened at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival, where it won a special jury award for editing. That film is currently available through iTunes, Vimeo and Amazon’s screening service. A podcast on Brinkley’s exploits, titled “Man of the People” and featuring “Nuts!” director Penny Lane and “Charlatan” author Brock, aired in January of this year, and a film expected to star Robert Downey Jr. is in the works. While Brock’s book doesn’t include much about Brinkley’s early life, or Jackson County, it does paint a detailed (and typically unflattering) picture of the goat-gland specialist’s activities after he left Western North Carolina. Brinkley himself, however, never forgot his roots and kept in touch with a few people he had known as a boy. Despite investigations into his questionable medical treatments, area newspapers treated Brinkley as a star, and his Jackson County comings and goings were often front-page news in local papers. That all changed after his fall from grace when he was revealed to be a fraud. Hardly a mention of Brinkley is to be found in local newspapers in the three decades after his death. The Sylva Herald’s landmark 1951 Jackson County Centennial section, filled with stories of local history and luminaries, makes no mention of Brinkley, despite his national prominence and notoriety less than two decades earlier. Once he came into wealth and power, Brinkley himself created his own markers here, erecting a monument to his beloved Aunt Sally in a sharp curve between East LaPorte and Tuckasegee and having his name spelled out on the rock walls at the entrance to the farm a few hundred yards south that he purchased in 1936 from Claude Wike. Brinkley hired Will Smith, father of the late Bill Smith (a longtime local educator who won election as a county commissioner and Sylva board member), to manage the property for him. Bill Smith owned a collection of letters Brinkley wrote to his father, sometimes on an almost daily basis, directing day-to-day operations at the farm. Ray Ashe of East Fork, whose grandmother Amanda Wike Jackson lived next door to Brinkley’s Aunt Sally, remembers visiting the farm as a boy. “We went there one Sunday,” Ray said. “I remember he was very cordial and showed us everything, including their inner-spring mattresses.” According to Ray, Brinkley was lonely as a child. He often ate meals at Amanda Jackson’s and turned to Ray’s mother, Annie; her sister, Maggie; and brothers, Walter and Albert; for companionship. He was close to Ray’s Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 56 grandmother, who he called “Aunt Amanda” or “Aunt Mandy,” and corresponded with her; Ray has saved some of the letters and postcards his grandmother received from Brinkley and his wife, Minnie, that were mostly written when Brinkley was at the height of his fame and fortune. The first, dated Nov. 8, 1936, is in response to a letter Walter had written to tell Brinkley that Aunt Mandy was having trouble with her eyes. Just as he famously did during his radio shows, Brinkley offered advice, telling Aunt Mandy what to purchase at the “drug store in Sylva” to relieve her symptoms. “2-ounces of a ten percent solution of Argyrol and a medicine dropper. Dropping 5 or 10 drops in both eyes, rolling the eyeballs around and letting the medicine under the lids. I have found this to be of great relief to myself and others. The medicine is harmless, it is very black and stings the lids but that is of little consequence. I usually have it put in my eyes three times a day when I have eye strain or eye pain.” That letter also describes recent weather in Texas (two early frosts) and mentions the banana tree outside Brinkley’s window at his Del Rio mansion. Brinkley spared no expense on his palatial estate, filling it with tropical plants and animals. In “Charlatan,” Brock writes: “It was the home he created there – a mission-style manor and grounds near the Rio Grande – that had Texas talking: 16 acres of naked self-regard, part Versailles, part Barnum & Bailey.” The bulk of the correspondence Ray has surrounds a trip to Europe Brinkley took with Minnie and their son, Johnnie Boy, in the summer of 1937. While traveling, Brinkley sent Aunt Mandy at least a dozen postcards as well as three brief notes. Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 57 (The letter on the right, dated April 21, 1937, was sent to Amanda Wike Jackson from Dr. John R. Brinkley. The note on the left \was written July 9, 1937, also by Dr. John R. Brinkley to Amanda Wike Jackson of East LaPorte. All these illustrations, including the postcard pictured above and sent before, are courtesy of Ray Ashe.) Before the family left the Del Rio estate for their summer-long trip, the Brinkleys threw a big party – one so memorable that Brock describes it in his book, saying that 1,400 guests strolled the grounds while a stunt pilot did barrel-rolls overhead. “It was the biggest party the doctor ever threw the biggest south Texas could recall. After short speeches and a big feed, the night was crowned by an apocalyptic fireworks display: dogs, cats, ducks, soldiers on horseback appeared in the heavens etched in flame, each greeted with gasps and applause. The last rocket spelled a message that shimmered and flared among the stars: ‘Bon voyage Dr., Mrs. Brinkley and Johnnie,’” Brock writes. Brinkley wrote to Aunt Mandy before the trip. In an April 21 letter typed on “Brinkley Hospital” letterhead stationery, he tells her how busy he is and that he hopes to leave Texas by May 1. “We (are) up to our neck in work,” Brinkley writes. “I am having to go here and there besides operating every day, 5 operations yesterday, 6 this afternoon, many more are coming in.” After assuring Aunt Mandy that he and his family will call on her while they are in Tuckasegee, Brinkley says he will give a letter Aunt Mandy wrote to him to “Mrs. Brinkley” and that he’s sure Minnie will write Aunt Mandy if “she has time.” The letter is signed, “With lots of love, faithfully yours, J.R. Brinkley, M.D.” In the promised April 23, 1937, letter to Aunt Mandy, Minnie tells her of their planned trip – they will be in Jackson County May 5 or 6 on their way to New York to catch the Queen Mary – and of the party mentioned above. “Dr. Brinkley is giving a big garden party to several hundred (near 1,500) Del Rioians on next Sunday as a gesture of ‘good will,’” she writes. “We will be gone from Del Rio four months if our plans carry, so we do not want to be forgotten or not remembered with appreciation for the citizens’ good will.” Brock’s book provides the reason for the European journey: Dr. Brinkley had been elected president of the Del Rio Rotary Club, and he was to represent the group at the international Rotary convention in Nice. After leaving Del Rio in their airplane, the Brinkleys visited Aunt Mandy, who gave them some of her home-churned butter. These details are revealed in an undated letter Brinkley sent from the Queen Mary. “Just to let you know we are all right and having a smooth sea,” Brinkley wrote. “We have the rooms used by former King Edward and his mother when they were on this ship.” Brinkley also told Aunt Mandy “Johnnie enjoyed Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 58 your butter in the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York.” The subject of Johnnie and Aunt Mandy’s butter came up again in a postcard bearing a picture of the Notre Dame Cathedral mailed in July from Paris. “Johnnie Boy says he is homesick for Aunt Amanda’s butter and claims yours is the best butter in the world,” Brinkley said. On a postcard from Venice, dated June 21, 1937, that also bears a July 3 East LaPorte postmark, Brinkley wrote: “The streets here are water. You travel by boat. Love, J.R. Brinkley.” He spent his birthday that year in Luxemburg, sending Aunt Mandy a postcard with the queen’s picture and reminding her “Today is my birthday, July 8, 1885.” Brinkley also wrote the next day on stationery from the “Hotel Kaiserhof und Augusta-Viktoria-Bad,” saying he thought she would like it as a souvenir, and adding “‘Bad’ means ‘bath’” and “Yesterday I was 52. Time flies.” All the letters and cards are addressed simply to Mrs. Amanda (or Mrs. Mandy) Jackson, East LaPorte, North Carolina. As mentioned above, Brinkley was a topic of interest to local newspapers all during the 1930s, and the following selection of stories reflects that fact. Reports on Brinkley’s activities were often front-page news. Dr. John R. Brinkley in the Jackson County Journal, 1930 – 1940 (Transcribed by George Frizzell) These are verbatim transcriptions of articles from the Jackson County Journal, a Sylva (N.C) newspaper, which often featured updates on Dr. John R. Brinkley’s life and exploits. In some cases, typesetting errors, such as in the form of repeated words or phrases, have noted at the end of the respective texts. SEEK TO REVOKE BRINKLEY LICENSE IN MILFORD, KAN. Jackson County Journal, May 1, 1930 Dr. John R. Brinkley, native of Jackson county, and famous goat gland specialist is under investigation out in Milford, Kansas, in an effort to revoke his license to practice medicine in the State of Kansas. The complaint charges Dr. Brinkley with gross immorality and unprofessional conduct for the alleged perpetration of a fraud in obtaining his Kansas certificate in 1916. It also charges that he has pleaded guilty to and been sentenced on three liquor law violations at Junction City, Kansas in 1920, and that he had been placed under a $1,00 [sic] peace bond in Milford after being charged with threatening to kill another person. The complaint charges him with fraud and deception in proclaiming the benefits of a so-called compound operation. It states that Dr. Brinkley claims to transplant animal or human glands to the patient in performing certain of the operations, and denies that they can be performed in the manner described by Dr. Brinkley. He is also charged with having guaranteed cures in violation of the American Medical Association’s code of ethics. His attorney announced that Dr. Brinkley will resist attempt to revoke his license, and will conduct his defense in an orderly and courageous way. Dr. Brinkley is well known in Jackson county, having been born and reared here, and having begun the practice of medicine in this county a number of years ago. He is said to have made a visit to Jackson county last summer. Dr. Brinkley, it is said, operates a hospital and radio station out in Kansas, and people here have frequently heard radio broadcasts from his station. (Note: R. Alton Lee’s book The Bizarre Careers of John R. Brinkley (2002), pages 40-41, notes that Brinkley’s second wife, Minnie, had been charged with a violation of Kansas prohibition laws. However, Brinkley assumed responsibility for the incident and received a sentence. The other events referenced include accusations of violent behavior or threats on Brinkley’s part, which resulted in one instance of a $1,000 peace bond.) Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 59 GO TO BRINKLEY TRIAL Jackson County Journal, July 17, 1930 V.V. Hooper, Julius Painter and Robert L. Madison are in Milford, Kansas, where they have been summoned to appear in behalf of Dr. John Brinkley, in the trial in progress there, in which it is sought to deprive him of his license to practice medicine, and to stop his radio broadcasting station. BRINKLEY GOT 185,258 VOTES Jackson County Journal, November 20, 1930 One of the most amazing election facts in recent years was that Dr. John H. [sic] Brinkley, native of Jackson county, entering the gubernatorial race in Kansas too late to have his name printed on the ballots, received 185,258 votes for governor, to 216,138 for the Democratic candidate and 215,468 for the Republican candidate. And every man and woman who voted for Brinkley wrote his name on the ballot. The papers of Kansas and the middle west have been busy ever since trying to figure out how Brinkley did it. He made his chief campaign over his radio station at Milford and it was the counties in that part of the State that voted for Brinkley. It has the politicians and the papers out that way worried. They can’t fathom it. Even William Allen White, the Emporia sage, has devoted columns of space explaining the Brinkley vote. Said the Kansas City Star, in beginning several columns of interesting reading matter dealing with Brinkley’s vote: “How did Brinkley do it?” “The answer to the amazing outpouring of votes in behalf of the Milford goat gland quack, running as the people’s candidate for Governor of Kansas, is not to be found in one, but in many reasons.” “Two members of the Star’s staff have spent the last few days after the election in visiting various parts of the state following up the wide swath cut by the Brinkley tornado. One visited the cities that Brinkley carried and the other went into the agricultural communities.” “In this respect their analysis of the vote agree: The Brinkley radio station was the greatest factor. In the farm homes, at the crossroads stores and other group gathering places, the smooth tongued Brinkley was heard often and persistently as the campaign ran along. His voice, carrying a little touch of religion along with its vote appeal, was heard by the women as they washed dishes or churned milk. . . .” (Note: the remainder of the article is an analysis of the Kansas election, along with vote tallies for some areas and discussion of the outcome.) BRINKLEY BUYS JERRY WIKE FARM Jackson County Journal, March 12, 1936 p;l Announcement has been made of the sale of the Jerry Wike farm, between East Laporte and Tuckaseigee, to Dr. John R. Brinkley, of Del Rio, Texas. Dr. Brinkley, who is internationally known, and whose hospital, broadcasting station, and controversies with the Kansas City Star, the American Medical Society, the Federal Radio Commission, and his race for Governor of Kansas have kept him in the public eye, is a native of this county, and began the practice of medicine here. No intimation has been made as to what he contemplates doing with his newly acquired property in this county. Mr. C. E. Wike, who sold the property to Dr. Brinkley, has bought property in Canada township, and will move there. (Note: While this article refers to sale of the “Jerry” Wike farm to Brinkley, it is actually known as the “Jack” Wike farm, as seen in subsequent articles in this section.) DR. BRINKLEY CAME HOME Jackson County Journal, March 19, 1936 Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 60 Dr. John R. Brinkley, as is his way, made a dramatic appearance in Sylva Sunday, and remained until Monday afternoon. Dr. Brinkley, widely known as the radio medicine man, whose spectacular financial success with his sanatorium at Milford, Kansas, attracted the attention of the Kansas City Star, the American Medical Society, and the Federal Radio Commission, resulting in bitter controversy with those in situations and organizations, came near to being elected Governor of the State of Kansas, running independent and probably would have been elected if his name had been printed on the ballot instead of having to be written in by the voters. Later he moved his sanatorium to Del Rio, Texas, and his broadcasting stations across the border in Mexico, where he continues to operate. He has been branded a quack and a faker, by his opponents, but he continues to get the attention and the patients, and today is an international figure. A native of this county, born near Beta, and reared near Tuckaseigee, Dr. Brinkley is well known to many people here. He always had the reputation, among his teachers and school maters, as being unusually bright. He once carried the mail from Tuckaseigee to Sylva, and picked up telegraphy at the Sylva station while waiting for trains to arrive, so that he could mount his horse and return with the mail to the Forks of the River. He operated a tent show through this section. He went away, and returned to begin the practice of medicine in this county. Sunday, after making a flight in his own airplane from Del Rio to Spartanburg, where his red Cadillac coupe was awaiting him, he hurried to Sylva, to inspect the Jack Wike farm, which he recently purchased, in the name of his son, and to look after the proper execution and registration of the transfer papers. With his coupe, painted a brilliant red, and his name “Dr. John R. Brinkley, Del Rio, Texas,” painted on the rear, he immediately caught the eyes of people here, and crowds gathered about him wherever he went. He called upon some of his old acquaintances, went to the railway station, seated himself at his old key, and talked again with Parson Kincaid at Dillsboro, as he used to do, years ago. That was John Brinkley’s return to Sylva and Jackson county. What he will do with his property here has not been disclosed; but that he will do something to attract attention is certain, for John Brinkley puts a touch of the spectacular to everything he does, and makes every move an advertisement for himself and his business. That being true, it is more than probable that Sylva and Jackson county will get a vast amount of free publicity, of one kind and another, out of the fact that and another, out of the fact that property here. (Note: the last sentence of this article has typesetting errors. It reads, in part, “of one kind and another, out of the fact that and another, out of the fact that property here.” This might should read, “of one kind and another, out of the fact that property here.”) (This topographic map featuring Brinkley’s holdings in the Plott Balsams is from a 1937 typescript report “Properties of Dr. John R. Brinkley, Sylva, North Carolina.” Of additional interest are place names that typically are no longer used. For instance, the post office of Painter is located on the Tuckasegee River next to Cullowhee. Courtesy of Special Collections, WCU.) Dr. Brinkley Buys Plott Balsam Range Jackson County Journal, September 3, 1936 Announcement has been made of the purchase of the 9,000 acres Davis tract of land in this county by Dr. John R. Brinkley, of Del Rio, Texas, and Milford, Kansas. The lands include Black Rock, Waterrock Knob, and Yellow Face, three of the highest mountains in this entire area. It includes both side of much of the Plott Balsam range that towers above Sylva to altitudes well above 6,000 feet. Dr. Brinkley states that he will immediately fence the entire boundary, institute a reforestation program in that portion of his land that has been cut over; and that he will restock the streams with trout and the forest with game, Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 61 developing the property as a private game and fish preserve. There has been much speculation here as to whether or not Dr. Brinkley will erect a hospital, a sanitarium, or a hotel on his property. It would be admirably adapted for either purpose. But, if he has any such plans, he has not divulged them. Dr. Brinkley, who has attracted international attention with his hospital and his radio station, and when he jarred Kansas politics by almost being elected Governor, running as an independent with the voters writing his name in on the ticket, was born and reared in this country. As a boy he carried the mail from here to Tuckaseigee on horseback, and picked up telegraphy at the Sylva railway station, while waiting for the mail trains. Last spring, Dr. Brinkley bought the Jack Wike farm, near East LaPorte, and has had his agents gathering a crack herd of thoroughbred Hereford cattle on his pastures there. Brinkley To Speak At Tuckaseegee Jackson County Journal, August 26, 1937 Dr. John R. Brinkley, of Del Rio, Texas and East LaPorte, will speak at the Baptist church at Tuckaeseigee [sic] next Sunday, August 29, at 10:30 Dr. Brinkley, who is a native of Jackson county, and who, last year, bought extensively in Jackson County real estate, will speak on his journeys through the Holy Land. Huge Crowd Here Pleased By Brinkley Jackson County Journal, September 2, 1937 A large crowd of citizens from Sylva and other points in the county gathered at the community house, Monday evening, to hear Dr. John R. Brinkley addressed [sic] the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce. Dr. Brinkley, who was born and reared in this county, and who came back here, last year and bought a live-stock farm and summer home at Tuckaseigee, and a large tract of land in the Balsam Mountains, promised that he will give Sylva and Jackson County “a million dollars worth of advertising on his radio, at Del Rio, Texas, this winter”. Dr. Brinkley stated that he did not intend to tell the Chamber of Commerce nor the people of Jackson County how to run their business but that, since he had been invited to address the meeting, he thought he could with propriety tell what the Del Rio Chamber, with which he is closely affiliated, is doing, and that the organization which is serving this town and county might gain from the example before them. He stressed the importance of the utmost courtesy being shown all visitors, by everyone with whom they come in contact. He pointed out that this section has many advantages over all others as a tourist center; and the theme of his speech was “blow your own horn, for nobody else is going to blow it for you—attract the tourists here, show them what you have, display the opportunities for investment, and treat them so well that the more desirable ones will want to become permanent residents and investors here”. To This end he advocated a wide-awake Chamber of Commerce, liberally and enthusiastically supported by the people. BRINKLEY MAKES GOOD ON JACKSON ADVERTISING Jackson County Journal, September 16, 1937 When Dr. John R. Brinkley made an address to the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce, he stated that when he got back to Del Rio, he would give Sylva and Jackson County a million dollars worth of free advertising over his radio station; and he has started making good on that promise. Every night his voice tells the world about the wonders of this county and town. The results will be felt next summer. He took with him Samantha Bumgarner, Jim Corbin, Seb Cope, Alvin Nicholson, Wallace Wood, and other interpreters of mountain music and they are presenting nightly programs, from Del Rio. Brinkley Pleads For U.S. Peace Jackson County Journal, October 5, 1939 From 1,500 to 2,000 people gathered at Tuckaseigee on Sunday for the annual homecoming at the Baptist church, and to hear Dr. John R. Brinkley, native of Jackson county, who grew up in that community, owns a Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 62 summer home and farm there, and commutes by airplane to his hospitals in Del Rio, Texas, and Little Rock, Arkansas. People from all parts of Western North Carolina, including the City of Asheville, across the Great Smokies, in Tennessee were there. A picture, of the school of the locally famous Prof. Dawson, was made, with Dr. Brinkley and some 40 other former students of Mr. Dawson. McKinley Hooper was master of ceremonies for the occasion. Mr. John A. Hooper, who knew Dr. Brinkley during his boyhood, paid a tribute to him. W. H. Smith headed the arrangements and reception committee. The first speaker was Rev. J. S. Burnett, Methodist minister, now located at Pittman Center, Pennsylvania, who is Dr. Brinkley’s only blood relative. Dr. Burnett has led an active and helpful life, both in the ministry and in establishing schools for underprivileged children. He stated that Dr. Brinkley has been a great help to him in that work, both financially and with his advice. Rev. Samuel S. Cookson, of St. Mary’s Kans., who was Dr. Brinkley’s pastor, in Milford, for 4 years, paid a glowing tribute to the doctor. He had campaigned for Brinkley during his two races for Governor of Kansas, and stated that Brinkley was bleeding Kansas; and that the doctor twice elected governor, out there in would be his choice for President of the United States. He disclosed that half a million letters have been received, asking Brinkley to make the race for the presidency. Rev. Samuel Morris, of Del Rio, paid tribute to Dr. Brinkley, and compared conditions now and before prohibition. He stated that we used to have the saloon, and that now nearly every café and many grocery stores have become saloons. He is a famous temperance lecturer, and left immediately for Washington to address a convention of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. He spoke of the capabilities of the men of the mountains, and expressed the opinion that one of the greatest forces holding back the mountain people of the South is liquor. The last Sunday in September each year, was set aside as John R. Brinkley Day at Tuckaseigee by the people assembled. Mrs. Brinkley expressed her gratification at the tribute paid her husband, and the hope that their son, John R. Brinkley III, would receive the same treatment as her husband, by the people of the mountains, from whom he came. Dr. Brinkley spoke on neutrality, and urged that this country keep out of the European conflict. “our duty,” he said, “is to keep the raging flames from reaching America, so that our institutions will remain standing, and the lives of the young men of the country be safe-guarded. We can and must remain neutral, and build the walls of peace higher by making every preparation necessary to defend the homeland against invasion from any source. In this hour our duty to the flag to our homes, and to all that we cherish, is to control our passions and guard our tongues. We have our convictions. We have our favorites in the fight. But, we have our boys. Their welfare should transcend any interest we have in European affairs. If we love them, and if we want to save them, we should tell Congress to keep us out of war. Peace is of God and it will greatly bless us; while war is of man’s making and it will singe our hopes like frost blights a tender bloom.” (Note: This article appeared only a month after the outbreak of World War II in Europe and reflected a desire to remain out of the emerging conflict. The reference to Rev. Cookson’s support of Brinkley’s aspirations to become Governor of Kansas may indicate a belief that if Brinkley had succeeded in those elections, then a run for the Presidency of the United States may have been a consideration. The phrase “Bleeding Kansas” in this instance invoked the political doctrine of “populism,” as would be referenced again in Brinkley’s obituary.) Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 63 Tuckasegee Baptist Church held “Brinkley Days” for several years, and the top photo shows the crowd arriving for one of those events. Based on information in the Sept. 19, 1940, edition of the Jackson County Journal, it is known that Brinkley Day was held on Sept. 22 that year. In the photo below, thought to be taken during the 1937 event, which was held on Aug. 29, Brinkley is standing toward the left in the back row, and, starting from the left, is the first hatless man in that row. Will Smith, who managed Brinkley’s local properties from 1936 until 1938, is the tallest man in the back row. John A. Hooper, seated at far right in front row, had a contract to deliver mail in the Tuckasegee area. Brinkley once worked for him. – Photos courtesy of Tuckasegee Baptist Church. Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 64 Tuckaseigee Church To Have Dr. Brinkley Day Jackson County Journal, September 19, 1940 Doctor John R. Brinkley Day will be held in the Baptist church at Tuckaseigee next Sunday, September 22nd at 11 o’clock in the morning. Doctor Brinkley will be present and give a talk. He has requested that because of the recent calamity that has visited the section that the usual entertainment and dinner be omitted and any money to be used for the occasion be spent in helping the needy. Everyone is invited to hear Dr. Brinkley and renew old time acquaintances. (Note: the reference to the “recent calamity” is to the flood that occurred in Jackson County on the night of August 30-31, which resulted in widespread damage.) In 1938 Brinkley self-published his book Roads Courageous: Being a Compilation of Radio Talks Given Over the Radio Station XERA during the Fall and Winter Months of 1937 and 1938. He signed a copy for Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Cox. Cora Davies Cox (1869-1957) was the daughter of D. D. Davies of Cullowhee who owned the “Forest Hill” property. Thomas A. Cox (1863-1945) was an engineer, investor, state legislator, Jackson County promoter, and member of the Board of Trustees of what is now Western Carolina University from 1889-1923. Courtesy of Special Collections, WCU. Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 65 1880 Jackson County Census Records ED: We continue in this issue the Savannah Township. Abstracted in 2017 by Sanji Talley Watson. The records were abstracted as written. Enumerator had problems with reporting place of birth for some people. 102-102 Barker, Avery 30 W – Works in saw mill NC NC NC Mary 28 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Callie 10 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Jane 8 W – Daughter “ “ “ Jullias 6 W – Son “ “ “ 103-103 Estice, Jessie 35 W – Farmer NC NC NC Margret 31 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Elizabeth 14 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ William W. 13 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ John C. 9 W – Son “ “ “ Curtis A. 6 W – Son “ “ “ Ansly T. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Lee C. 2 W – Son “ “ “ 104-104 Gunter, Dorcas 40 W – Keeping house NC NC NC Penn 10 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Robert 9 W – Son “ “ “ Ida 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Allice 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ 105-105 Mason, Jacob 86 W – Farmer NC NC NC Elizabeth 68 W – Keeping house “ “ “ 106-106 Green, George W. 36 W – Farmer NC NC NC Sarah C. 36 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Cordealia 13 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Judson H. 10 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Mariah A. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Robert W. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Nancy A. 1 W -- Daughter “ “ “ 107-107 Ashe, Elcainah 55 W – Blacksmith NC NC NC Mary 54 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Asbury B. 16 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ 108-108 Messer, Solomon 69 W – Blacksmith NC NC NC Sarah 54 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ 109-109 Wikle, John 21 W – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Mary 18 W – Keeping house “ “ “ Thomas 2 W – Son “ “ “ 110-110 Green, Jeremiah 35 W – Farmer NC NC NC Nancy 35 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Benjamin N. 14 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Powell W. 12 W – Son – Farmer Laborer “ “ “ Sarah M. 10 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ 111-111 Green, Silas J. 58 W – Farmer NC NC NC Mary A. 44 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Nancy J. 18 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Ellander 15 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Quilliams, Sarah 75 W – Mother-in-law – At home “ “ “ 112-112 Morgan, Jason 31 W – Farmer NC NC NC Margret 40 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Nancy M. 17 W –Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 66 Phillip J. 13 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Emily J. 11 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Robert J. 9 W – Son “ “ “ George 7 W – Son “ “ “ William 6 W – Son “ “ “ Frank 4 W – Son “ “ “ John S. 1 W – Son “ “ “ 113-113 Messer, William 35 W – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Elizabeth 25 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Milton M. 2 W – Son “ “ “ Solomon M. 3/12 W – Son “ “ “ 114-114 Messer, Levi 28 W – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Margret 25 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ John K. 5 W – Son “ “ “ Rosa E. 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ 115-115 Buchanan, James M. 44 W – Farmer NC NC NC Elmira C. 45 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Armeada J. 16 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Emliss O. 14 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Mary C. 11 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ John C. 10 W – Son – Farm laborer “ “ “ Annis T. 6 W – Son “ “ “ James E. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Lora E. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ 116-116 Green, David 39 W – Farmer NC NC NC Eliza 41 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Rufus C. 17 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Mathew M. 14 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Clingman 11 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Lovia 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ Benjiman B. 7 W – Son “ “ “ Lillie L. 5 W – Daughter “ “ “ 117-117 Ashe, Daniel H. 32 W – Carpenter NC NC NC Martha M. 33 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Sultina E. 13 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Louis C. 10 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Ida 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Felix M. 5 W – Son “ “ “ Hattie B. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ 118-118 Green, Silas 72 W – Farmer NC NC NC Aggie 34 W – Daughter – Keeping house “ “ “ 119-119 McMahan, Clarisa 44 W – Farmer NC NC NC Trantham, Burton 19 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Trantham, William 17 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ McMahan, Curtis 12 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Warren 10 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Arch 7 W – Son “ “ “ Evidine 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ 120-120 Green, Joseph 46 W – Farmer NC NC NC Parthana 45 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Clarisa E. 21 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Nancy C. 20 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Josephine 17 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 67 William T. 15 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ George M. 11 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Mariott 10 W – Son “ “ “ Mary C. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Wilburn 5 W – Son “ “ “ 121-121 Louis, John 28 W – Farmer NC NC NC Loucyan 28 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Mary H. 8 W – Daughter “ “ “ William 6 W – Son “ “ “ George 4 W – Son “ “ “ Clingman 2 W – Son “ “ “ 122-122 Green, Jerimiah 30 W – Farmer NC NC NC Emly 35 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Euginia 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ Maggie 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Phillip H. 4 W -- Son “ “ “ Estice 2 W – Son “ “ “ 123-123 Green, Leander 49 W – Farmer NC NC NC Agniss 49 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Rhoda 25 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Loucy 22 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Robert 18 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ James 15 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Lavada 13 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Erma 12 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Jerimiah Jr. 9 W – Son “ “ “ Christopher 5/12 W – Grandson “ “ “ 124-124 Broocks, Thomas 25 W – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Sarah 27 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Rhoda 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Martha 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Colman 5 W – Son “ “ “ Joseph 2 W – Son “ “ “ William 6/12 W – Son “ “ “ 125-125 Buchanan, Charles 54 W – Farmer NC NC NC Minervia 54 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Leander 24 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Mary J. 21 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Sarah 18 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ John 15 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Collumbus 13 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Laura E. 11 W – Daughter – Asst. keeping house “ “ “ Charley 6 W – Son “ “ “ 126-126 Cannon, Henry C. 34 W – Carpenter NC NC NC Rebecca A. 30 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Mollie A. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ John A. 5 W – Son “ “ “ Leona P. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ Thomas C. 28/30 W -- Son “ “ “ This completes the Savannah Township. Next we will start with the Cullowhee Township. 1-1 Rogers, Robert 57 W – Farmer NC NC NC Rebecca T. 41 W – Wife – Keeping house GA GA GA Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 68 Dollie 26 W – Daughter – Keeping house Ala NC GA Ida 21 W – Daughter – Keeping house “ “ “ Hugh S. 18 W – Son – Farming “ “ “ Lillie B. 15 W – Daughter – Works in garden NC NC GA Lula S. 12 W – Daughter – Unemployed “ “ “ Sallie V 9 W – Daughter – Unemployed “ “ “ Ella B. 5 W – Daughter – Unemployed “ “ “ Effie N. 2 W – Daughter – Unemployed “ “ “ Not named 24/30 W – Daughter -- Unemployed “ “ “ 2-2 Hooper, James M. 60 W – Farmer NC SC SC Margaret M. 52 W – Wife – Keeping house NC NC NC Margaret E. 22 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Lee 17 W – Son – Works on Farm “ “ “ Paulene 15 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Stella 13 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ 3-3 Hooper, William W. 31 W – Working on farm “ “ “ Martha D. 26 W – Wife – Keeping house GA NC NC Andrew W. 5 W – Son – Unemployed GA NC GA Sarah C. 2 W – Daughter – Unemployed “ “ “ 4-4 Rogers, Weston B. 26 W – Farmer NC NC NC Rebecca D. 23 W – Wife – Housekeeping “ “ “ Robert J. 1 W – Son NC SC NC 5-5 Hooper, Andrew D. 51 W – Farmer NC NC NC Elizabeth J. 46 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Mary A. 19 W – Daughter “ “ “ Sarah A. 14 W -- Daughter “ “ “ Laura R. 12 W – Daughter “ “ “ James C. 8 W – Son “ “ “ William A. 6 W – Son “ “ “ John R. 2 W – Son “ “ “ Clandius 9/12 W – Gra. Son “ “ “ Ash, William 19 W – Laborer “ “ “ 6-6 Bryson, Louisa 45 W – Farmer NC NC NC Melvina 23 W – Daughter – Keeping house “ “ “ Andrew C. 18 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ James R. L. 16 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ William M. 13 W – Son –Works on farm “ “ “ 7-7 Taylor, Mary 58 W – Farmer NC NC NC Emiline 33 W – Daughter – Keeping house “ “ “ Zachariah 22 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Martha 20 W – Daughter “ “ “ Thomas C. 18 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Mary J. 15 W – Daughter “ “ “ Matthew A. 13 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Hill, Nancy 65 W – Serving & Knitting VA VA VA 8-8 Taylor, Amos E. 31 W – Farmer NC NC NC Belzora 19 W – Wife – Keeping house * NC NC GA Williams, John 16 W – Laborer NC SC SC 9-9 Pressley, Tulilia P. 34 W – Farmer NC NC NC Sarah 32 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Nancy E. 13 W – Daughter “ “ “ James A. 11 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Louisa J. 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 69 Descendants of William Solomon Parker, Sr. ED: If you have any corrections or additions to this article, please feel free to contact us with them. iv. Josiah Anderson Galloway, b. October 07, 1860; d. June 29, 1925, Transylvania County, North Carolina; m. Mary Brown. 109. v. Thomas Clingman Galloway, b. 1863; d. August 28, 1940, Jackson County, North Carolina. vi. Lydia C. Galloway, b. 1865. 110. vii. Andrew Elias Galloway, b. June 28, 1867; d. March 24, 1945, Jackson County, North Carolina. 39. William Riley Galloway was born May 11, 1818 in Cherokee County, North Carolina, and died September 21, 1886 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. He married Lydia Glazener, daughter of Abraham Glazener and Mary Beasley. She was born June 21, 1820 in North Carolina, and died December 05, 1904 in North Carolina. Notes for William Riley Galloway: 15 Jun 1870 Gloucester Twp, P.O. Cherry Field, Transylvania Co., NC 1860 P.O. Gloucester, Henderson Co., NC 17 Jun 1880 Gloucester Twp, Transylvania Co., NC Children of William Galloway and Lydia Glazener are: 111. i. Asberry Lafayette Galloway, b. August 12, 1846; d. May 21, 1916, Transylvania County North Carolina. ii. Sarah Rebecca Galloway, b. Abt. 1844. iii. Emarillis Galloway, b. Abt. 1848; m. Albert T. Glazener, May 30, 1869. iv. Naomi Galloway, b. 1853; d. 1941; m. James Gaston McCall; b. February 12, 1843, Gloucester Township, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. March 26, 1911, Gloucester Township, Transylvania County, North Carolina. Notes for James Gaston McCall: 1880 Gloucester Township, Transylvania Co., NC Federal Census, Page 261D: McCall, Jas. G., Head, Widower, age 36, NC, Farmer; Wesley C., Son, age 12, NC; Wm. A., Son, age 11, NC; Emily C., Daughter, age 8, NC; Jasper F., Son, age 7, NC; Julius M., Son, age 4, NC Military service: Pvt, Company K, 62th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, CSA v. Millard Fillmore Galloway, b. February 17, 1857, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. November 11, 1937, Transylvania County, North Carolina; m. Martha Catherine Wood. 112. vi. Nancy Mary M. Galloway, b. 1861, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. Abt. 1889. 113. vii. Harriett S. Galloway, b. October 20, 1850, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. February 03, 1936, Flint Hill, Fannin County, Georgia. 114. viii. Edwin Taylor Galloway, b. 1859. 40. Augustus Eli Galloway was born January 17, 1820, and died February 28, 1892 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. He married (1) Elizabeth Owen, daughter of John Owen and Lavinia Parker. She was born November 26, 1826 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died May 01, 1912 in Quebec, Transylvania County, North Carolina. He married (2) Elizabeth Owen December 14, 1838, daughter of Joseph Owen and Lettie Belcher. She was born December 28, 1817 in North Carolina, and died July 11, 1881 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. Children of Augustus Galloway and Elizabeth Owen are: i. Clifford Galloway, b. 1847. ii. Emeline Galloway, b. 1848. 115. iii. Sylvanus Galloway, b. November 30, 1852, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. December 03, 1930, Transylvania County, North Carolina. iv. Sylontes Galloway, b. 1854. 116. v. Rufus Justice Galloway, b. 1850, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. March 15, 1937, Jackson County, North Carolina. Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 70 Children of Augustus Galloway and Elizabeth Owen are: 117. vi. Selena Galloway, b. 1843; d. 1938. vii. Evaline Galloway, b. January 23, 1848; d. July 26, 1904, Transylvania County North Carolina; m. Hansel McCall, September 06, 1861; b. November 16, 1842; d. July 04, 1927, Transylvania County North Carolina. viii. Sarah C. Galloway, b. April 24, 1841; m. Tyrah McCall, July 25, 1859, Henderson County, North Carolina; b. April 06, 1839. 118. ix. Clifford Galloway, b. September 14, 1845; d. September 15, 1915, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 119. x. Robert Monroe Galloway, b. April 24, 1841, Henderson County, North Carolina; d. September 05, 1864, Civil War. ED: There is conflicting information on the two families. Were there two families? Were there two Elizabeth Owen? If anyone has any information to clear this up please let us know. 41. James Milford Owen was born April 04, 1817 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died June 01, 1892 in Towns County, Georgia. He married Elizabeth Jane Margaret Parker November 05, 1838 in Haywood County, North Carolina, daughter of William Parker and Elizabeth Brown. She was born October 04, 1816 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died March 23, 1899 in Towns County, Georgia. They are buried in the Bell Creek Methodist Church Cemetery. Notes for James Milford Owen: In the early 1860's James Owen moved his family to Towns County, Georgia where his wife's parents and several of her brothers had moved several years earlier. By 1863 they had settled on Upper Bell Creek where James was registered as a member of the local militia company in District #990. It has been passed down through the family that during the Civil War James and Elizabeth Owen opened their home as a "hospital" for the sick. The itinerant doctor, on his rounds through the mountains, would stop at the Owen home and there attend the sick of the surrounding neighborhood. Appearing before Martin L. Burch Towns County Ordinary, on Aug. 24, 1865, James Owen took the amnesty oath. He was described as having "fair complexion, light hair, blue eyes, 5 ft. 9 in., 48 years of age, and by occupation a farmer." He served as county treasurer from 1864 to 1875 and from 1883 to 1887. Children are listed above under (12) Elizabeth Jane Margaret Parker. 42. William Baxter Owen was born April 09, 1820 in North Carolina, and died September 01, 1891 in Transylvania County North Carolina. He married Sarah H. Whitmire, daughter of Christopher Whitmire and Sarah Galloway. She was born August 08, 1826 in North Carolina, and died 1894 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. Children of William Owen and Sarah Whitmire are: 120. i. James Marion Owen, b. October 31, 1845, Henderson County, North Carolina; d. January 06, 1916, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 121. ii. George Washington Owen, b. October 11, 1846, North Carolina; d. June 13, 1927, Transylvania County North Carolina. iii. John Clingman Owen, b. May 14, 1851; d. January 07, 1927; m. Susan Jane Williams, February 03, 1870; b. May 11, 1847; d. August 12, 1936. 122. iv. Laura Elizabeth Owen, b. January 18, 1853, North Carolina; d. Texas. 123. v. Mary Ann Owen, b. June 01, 1855, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. February 14, 1949, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 124. vi. William Baxter Jr Owen, b. March 08, 1858, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. October 14, 1917, Jackson County, North Carolina. vii. Margaret Malinda Owen, b. February 23, 1859; d. 1880; m. James Dekalb Williams, February 23, 1871; b. 1849, Pennsylvania; d. 1923, Oklahoma. viii. Sarah Jane Owen, b. July 01, 1863, North Carolina; d. September 24, 1945, Oklahoma; m. James Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 71 Dekalb Williams; b. 1849, Pennsylvania; d. 1923, Oklahoma. 125. ix. Alfred Sherman Owen, b. August 26, 1865, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. January 22, 1939, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 126. x. Elvira Pernette Owen, b. September 26, 1867, North Carolina; d. July 10, 1933, Transylvania County North Carolina. xi. Robert Columbus Owen, b. December 03, 1869, North Carolina; d. 1894; m. Lucinda E. Shelton; b. August 13, 1866, North Carolina; d. November 07, 1959, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 43. Jessie Roland Owen was born June 10, 1822 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died November 17, 1892 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. He married Judith Reid March 16, 1845, daughter of James Reid and Lucretia Dillard. She was born February 04, 1827 in South Carolina, and died March 10, 1910 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. Notes for Jessie Roland Owen: 1850 Census -- Macon County -- Hogback, 6th Nov. page 370/739 Jesse Owens 28 M Farmer 25 Henderson NC Judith 24 F SC Elizabeth 4 F Macon NC Lucretia P. 2 F Macon NC Farm: 20 improved. 30 unimproved acres. Farm value, $25. Fram implements, $10. Livestock value $150: 2 horses, 2 milch cows, 7 other cattle, 18 swine. Produce: 19 bu. rye, 100 bu. Indian corn, 15 bu. Irish potatoes, 20 bu. buckwheat, 100 lbs. butter. Homemade manufacture, $25. Animals slaughtered, $50. Children of Jessie Owen and Judith Reid are: 127. i. Elizabeth Jane Owen, b. February 13, 1846; d. April 12, 1884. 128. ii. Lucretia Jane Penetta Owen, b. March 03, 1848, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. May 29, 1935, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 129. iii. Samuel Columbus Owen, b. January 28, 1852; d. April 02, 1911. iv. Marcus L. Owen, b. March 03, 1854; d. March 20, 1913; m. Judith Ann Paxton; b. May 01, 1850; d. December 05, 1932. v. Thomas C. Owen, b. March 29, 1856; d. June 05, 1874. vi. Elijah Dillard Owen, b. April 16, 1858; d. March 11, 1931; m. Samantha Moore; b. January 14, 1859; d. May 19, 1920. vii. William Jasper Owen, b. September 20, 1863, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. January 05, 1935, Transylvania County, North Carolina; m. (1) Maude Lee Patterson; b. November 29, 1905, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. May 16, 1985, Transylvania County, North Carolina; m. (2) Nancy Talullah Corbin, June 07, 1886, Transylvania County, North Carolina; b. June 17, 1872, South Carolina; d. March 20, 1920, Transylvania County, North Carolina. viii. Harriett Charlotte Owen, b. January 15, 1866; d. March 11, 1945; m. Pierce Moses; b. 1854. ix. Nancy Christine Olivia Owen, b. May 12, 1868; d. March 31, 1960; m. Miles Galloway, 1888; b. March 27, 1865; d. October 15, 1953. x. Jesse Roland Owen, b. November 09, 1871; d. May 03, 1969; m. (1) Sallie Alison; b. August 22, 1880; d. August 15, 1902; m. (2) Marie Snell; b. 1906; d. November 24, 1924; m. (3) Nell Bishop McHughs. 130. xi. Mary Malinda Owen, b. March 01, 1860; d. October 16, 1930. 44. John Bishop Iii Owen was born December 27, 1823 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died July 27, 1899 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. He married (1) Malinda Reed, daughter of James Reid and Lucretia Dillard. She was born August 27, 1830 in South Carolina, and died July 18, 1915 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. He met (2) "Slave Woman". He married (3) Mary Unknown. Children of John Owen and Malinda Reed are: 131. i. Mary Ellen Owen, b. December 29, 1849, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. 1892, Transylvania County North Carolina. 132. ii. Alfred Henry Owen, b. December 28, 1844, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. December 26, 1926, Transylvania County, North Carolina. Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 72 iii. Margaret Ellen Owen. 133. iv. Baxter Carmichael Owen, b. April 17, 1854, North Carolina; d. November 12, 1903, Transylvania County North Carolina. v. Nancy Elvira Owen, b. July 22, 1856, North Carolina; d. May 23, 1935, Norfolk County, Virginia; m. Julius Nicholas Breedlove, April 03, 1875, Transylvania County, North Carolina; b. October 15, 1853; d. June 20, 1922, Transylvania County North Carolina. vi. Julia A. Owen, b. October 22, 1858, North Carolina; d. April 01, 1936, Transylvania County North Carolina; m. Willam Monroe McCall; b. December 26, 1856, North Carolina; d. December 10, 1897, Transylvania County North Carolina. vii. Pete Owen, b. 1860; d. June 28, 1922, Transylvania County North Carolina; m. Madora Kemp; b. May 02, 1862; d. April 10, 1913. viii. Rhoda P. Owen, b. February 17, 1860, North Carolina; d. October 1879, North Carolina; m. William Hogsed, January 06, 1879, Transylvania County, North Carolina; b. 1860, North Carolina. 134. ix. John Ansel Owen, b. March 17, 1862, North Carolina; d. February 06, 1951, Transylvania County North Carolina. x. James Dillard Owen, b. April 17, 1865, North Carolina; d. August 06, 1930, Transylvania County North Carolina; m. (1) Letha Jones; b. March 04, 1882; d. March 06, 1963; m. (2) Sarah Frances Lance, March 27, 1884, Transylvania County, North Carolina; b. 1868; d. 1929. xi. Jesse Coleman Owen, b. May 26, 1870, Transylvania County North Carolina; d. November 07, 1955, Transylvania County North Carolina; m. Rebecca Y. Miller, June 30, 1900, Tengchow, China; b. April 25, 1872, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania; d. May 19, 1958, North Carolina. xii. Sarah Elizabeth Owen, b. July 07, 1872, North Carolina; d. August 31, 1947, Transylvania County North Carolina; m. Joseph Manning Galloway, August 24, 1890, Transylvania County, North Carolina; b. June 20, 1868, Transylvania County North Carolina; d. January 20, 1947, Transylvania County North Carolina. 135. xiii. Merritt Tillman Owen, b. December 17, 1851, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. June 17, 1892, Jackson County, North Carolina. xiv. Samuel Owen, b. 1867. 45. Elizabeth Owen was born November 26, 1826 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died May 01, 1912 in Quebec, Transylvania County, North Carolina. She married (1) John Christopher Whitmire, son of Christopher Whitmire and Sarah Galloway. He was born March 23, 1829, and died January 16, 1903 in Quebec, North Carolina. She married (2) Augustus Eli Galloway, son of James Galloway and Sarah Parker. He was born January 17, 1820, and died February 28, 1892 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. Children are listed above under (40) Augustus Eli Galloway. 46. Mary W. Owen was born October 10, 1827 in Henderson County, North Carolina, and died August 16, 1915 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. She married William M. McCall 1848 in Transylvania County, North Carolina, son of John McCall and Platima Glazener. He was born June 14, 1827 in Buncombe County, North Carolina, and died May 09, 1918 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. Children of Mary Owen and William McCall are: 136. i. William Walker McCall, b. November 05, 1852, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. November 26, 1943, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 137. ii. Mary Elmina McCall, b. Abt. 1848, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. Abt. 1946, Transylvania County, North Carolina. iii. Jesse Miles McCall, b. August 29, 1849; d. February 28, 1937; m. Lavina Elvinia Garren, March 14, 1869, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 138. iv. James Milford McCall, b. January 23, 1853, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. February 09, 1947, Transylvania County, North Carolina. v. Harvey Sylvanis McCall, b. April 14, 1863, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. June 16, 1948, Transylvania County, North Carolina; m. Mary L. McCall, Abt. 1883; b. 1865, Transylvania County North Carolina; d. February 12, 1963, Transylvania County North Carolina. Journeys Through Jackson Spring/Summer 2017 73 Jackson County Genealogical Society Scholarship Winners The Jackson County Genealogical Society has awarded scholarships to four local high school seniors. Each is valued at $750, and recipients were determined based on essays they wrote on their family history and interviews with the JCGS Scholarship Committee. The Society initially intended to grant three scholarships for 2017; however, two candidates were tied in the voting, and, through the generosity of the Jim and Jean Scott Foundation, funds were available to increase this year’s awards to four. “We were extremely pleased with the quality of this year’s applicants,” said Scholarship Committee Chairman Kenny Nicholson. “The Genealogical Society is excited to be able to award scholarships to these four deserving high school seniors.” Receiving scholarships are Karla Magana Almanza, a student at Blue Ridge Early College; Luke Sipler of Jackson County Early College; Morgan Carpenter and Shivani Patel, both students at Smoky Mountain High School. Magana Almanza, Sipler and Patel received Scott Foundation scholarships; Carpenter received the Robert Larry Crawford Scholarship. Magana Almanza, daughter of Juan Carlos Magana Mendez and Laura Almanza de Magana of Cullowhee, participates in Beta and Interact clubs at Bl