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Journeys Through Jackson 1997 Vol.07 No.09-10

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  • Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. The journal began as a monthly publication in July 1991, was published bimonthly from 1994 to 2003, and continues today as a quarterly publication. The journal issues in this digital collection are presented as annual compilations.
  • u c J o u r n e y s T h r o u g h J a c k s o n The Official Journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. L , Vol. VII, No. 9-10 September-October, 1997 JACKSON COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, INC. 1997 Officers ^ President William L. Crawford Vice Presidents Barbara W. Dooley RickL. Frizzell Secretary Marilyn G. Morton Treasurer David C. Frizzell Chair, Publications R. Larry Crawford Journeys Through Jackson is the official publication of die Jackson County Genealogical Society. Members and non-members are invited to submit genealogical materials for publication, with the understanding that the editor reserves the right to edit these materials for genealogical content, clarity, or taste. The Society assumes no responsibility for errors of fact that may be contained in submissions, and except where noted the opinions expressed are not those of the editor or of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. The Society accepts no advertising for this publication except for notices for other non-profit groups. From the Editor Like life itself, doing genealogy is full of highs and lows. We spend great numbers of hours pursuing this hobby because we love it, yet we are saddened by the great realities of life. In this issue, we offer our sympathy to Christine Beck Crawford and Nancy Foster, JCGS members who recently lost their husbands. On rare occasions, we encounter a piece of work that is so worthwhile and so valuable that we are touched with appreciation just for having seen it. This might be true of a work of literature, or art, or music, or any of a thousand other aspects of human life. For us, these works are genealogical in scope, and you are invited to be entertained, edified, and sometimes overwhelmed by the Jessie Miller Cogdill Mathis story printed in this ^y issue. You will learn a great deal about the Scotts Creek area of Jackson County, you will laugh, and you might even cry as you read this wonderful personal reminiscence. What an outstanding example of a Jackson County woman. Read also in this "Journeys" of the "journeys" of Jean Crawford Brown, as she finds an important part of the Crawford family history; continue to learn about the Monteith families of Betty Cope Andrews and the Turpin families of Thomas W. Johnson; if dates and statistics are your interest, then see the death certificates and delayed birth records in this issue; finally, enjoy and help the Society by identifying persons in the old pictures on our "mystery" page. We welcome several new members with this issue, and we invite you to become involved with one of the most active organizations in Jackson County. Our cemetery book is in full swing, our membership is at an all-time high, and our members are working very hard for the continued good health of our group. On Saturday, November 1,1997, the Society will meet at Fairview Gardens in Sylva to complete the data collection for our cemetery book. Be there and help! You are especially encouraged to be looking for a separate mailing soon. In it, we will be asking for your help in several ways, and we will be relating to you the latest effort of one of our most dedicated and resourceful members. The Society should benefit in many, many ways from this effort, and no, this does not mean that somebody has bequeathed us several million dollars. That would be welcome, but this is a more practical and workable circumstance. Ready? Build a fire, pull off your shoes, sink your teeth into a good mountain apple, and enjoy your "Journeys." u o Journeys Through Jackson, September-October 1997 Table of Contents Queries and Information 115 A Mystery Photo Page 116 1928 Death Certificates 117-118 The Jessie Miller Cogdill Mathis Story 119-126 Delayed Birth Certificates of Persons Born Prior to 1900 127-128 The Odyssey of Jean Crawford Brown 129-133 The Monteith Families of Betty Cope Andrews.-. 134-140 Response to the Turpin Box by Thomas W. Johnson 141-145 For Sale by JCGS 146 Query Robert and Helen Ballard Bumgardner, 2291 Americus Blvd. West, Apt#41 Clearwater, FL 33763-2562 send along an ancestry chart with the question, "Are there any Bumgardners in your area who are into genealogy on this surname? If so we have a computer database of over 7,000 allied names on various spellings of this surname." [Ed. This seems made to order for Harry Bumgarner and Neil Baumgartner. Anyone else connected to this family, any spelling of the surname, should write these folks.] In Memoriam JCGS member Doug Crawford 1932-1997 In Memoriam Charles Foster, husband of JCGS member Nancy Foster W A T C H FOR A S E P A R A T E M A I L I N G TO C O N F I R M THE B I G G E S T N E W S F O R J C G S S I N C E T H E P U B L I C A T I O N O F O UR H E R I T A G E B O O K I N 1 9 9 2 ! !! 115 3M£ Mystery Photograph The photograph above is the property of JCGS member Sharon Brown. She is unsure of the identity, but thinks that the picture may be a likeness of Nathaniel Deitz. While this photograph bears a strong resemblance to the one in the Heritage Book, it is possible that these are two different men. Can you positively identify this man? Ky Ky Ky 116 K, 1928 Death Certificates for Persons Born Prior to 1900 [Ed. Following arc the 1928 death certificates for the Sylva and Webster townships. Key to reading the following: Name of deceased; spouse; date of birth; place of birth; date of death; father; father's place of birth; mother; mother's place of birth; informant; informant's address; cemetery. Abstracted June 1997 in the Jackson County Register of Deeds Office by Larry Crawford.] Sylva Wykle,Sallie; w/o Will; 1864; Forsyth Co. GA; 29 Jan; John Russell; GA; Jane Barn; GA; Keister Conner, ng; Wesley Chapel McMahan, Ellen; w/o Ellis; ng; NC; 7 Mar, Jim Frizzle; NC; Annie Berry; NC; Jim Frizzle; ng; Stillwell Worley, Laura; single; 17 Mar 1881; Jackson Co.; 25 Mar, Zeb Worley; NC; Josie Love; NC; Zeb Worley; Sylva; Old Field Mathis, Maggie; w/o Bill; 1848; NC; 28 May; Andrew Mathis; TN; Easter Bryson; NC; Riley Mathis; Sylva; Beta Hooper, Manuel; h/o Selma; 7 Sep 1877; Rich Mtn.; 24 Nov;"W.H. Hooper; Jackson Co.; Catherine Parker; Jackson Co.; M.E. Hooper; Cullowhee; Saunook Brown, Mrs. Henry K.; 29 Jul 1848; Madison Co.; 30 Dec; James Fleming; Madison Co.; Betty Davis; Madison Co.; A.C. Brown; Sylva; Old Field Fisher, Minnie Caralee; w/o R.W.; age 51,1,28; Beta; 1 Jan 1929*; L.W. Allen; Beta; Amanda Robinson; Sylva; R.W. Fisher, Beta; Beta Grant, Crawford Moore; h/o Hassie; 28 Oct 1897; Swain Co.; 2 Jan; Charlie Grant; Swain Co.; Mandy McMahan; Macon Co.; ng; ng; Nantahala Moore, Fred Logan; h/o Mande Roaper; 24 Jan 1889; TN; 19 Jan; Eli Moore; TN; ng; TN; George Moore; ng; "near Whittier" Davenport, Mollie Ann; w/o Fate; 27 Jun 1865; GA; 4 Feb; Ben Holden; GA; Rachen McKuer; GA; Oscar Nicholson; ng; Wesley Chapel Roberts, Emmitt; ng; age 28; NC; 5 Feb; ng>, ng; Caroline Roberts; NC; Tom Stanley; ng; Wesley Chapel Henderson, Margaret Jane; w/o John C ; 29 Oct 1869; Jackson Co.; 30 Mar; Manuel O. Raby; NC; Elizabeth Cathey; NC; C J . Raby; Whittier; Webster Lowe, Laura Sussanna; 17 Feb 1868; Yadkin Co.; 11 Feb; Jim Angle**; Surry Co.; Huldie H. Shaw**; Yadkin Co.; W.G. Lowe; Sylva; East LaPorte Howell, Lee; h/o Laura; 10 Feb 1874; NC; 10 Mar, Henry Howell; NC; Bettie McDonald; NC; Jess Howell; Sylva; Barnes (Sylva) Hastings, Thomas Humphrey; h/o Ebbie; 25 Aug 1857; Bedford Co TN; 12 Feb; Giles Porter Hastings; Bedford Co TN; Roda Jarrett; Rutherford Co TN; Ebbie Hastings; Sylva; Sylva Franklin, Nancy; w/o John; 1888; Almond NC; 28 Apr, Jim Dills; Almond; Susan Cunningham; NC; Sophia Nelson; Almond; Almond Wells, Mary Ellen; w/o Charlie; 12 Jul 1874; Webster, 27 Apr, William R. Cowan; Webster, Mary Almond; Franklin; Lucy M. Wells; Sylva; Sylva Childers, Jane Mason; age 103,3,1; Spartanburg SC; 9 Jun; Eliza Quinten; Spartanburg SC; Miss Thorton; Spartanburg; N.L. Sutton; Sylva; Dillsboro Rickman, Nancy Elizabeth; w/o David W.; 13 May 1889; Needmore; 25 Jan; Frank Marr, NC; Harriett Breedlove; SC; David W. Rickman; Lauada; not given Wilson, Mary Matilda; w/o A.L.; 27 Jan 1872; Glenville; 8 Jun; J.A. Wiggins; NC; Angeline Wilson; Glenville; Mrs. John Monteith; ng; Glenville Frady, Amanda; w/o John S.; 1841; Jackson Co.; 13 Jun; Solomon Messer, ng; Rosa McMahan; Dillsboro; R.M. Frady; Cullowhee; Webster 117 Ky Mahaffey, D.D.; h/o Mary; 16 Aug 1872; SC; 20 Sep; Dock Mahaffey; SC; Nancy Reed; SC; G.M. Mahaffey; Smokemont; Balsam Gap Cooper, Mellie Bessie; w/o John Russell; 22 Oct 1894; Robbinsville; 1 Oct; John Ayers; NC; Miss Grindstaff; Mitchell Co; John Cooper; Robinsville; Old Cemetery-Robbinsville Love, Jim; h/o Minnie; 7 Mar 1886; Jackson Co; 25 Oct; Joe Love; Jackson Co; Lucindy Hall; Jackson Co; R.G. Wilson; Sylva; Love's Chapel Tallent, Joe; h/o Lucy; 22 Feb 1891; Macon Co; 26 Nov; Irvin Tallent; NC; Emma Dewese?; Macon Co; Lucy Tallent; Cowarts; Oakdale Buchanan, Minnie Carlee; w/o Thomas Coleman; 25 Feb 1895; Willets; 4 Dec; George W. Hodges; NC; Lillie Lindsey; NC; Tom Buchanan; East LaPorte; Willets Cope, Emma Victoria; w/o A.C; 20 Oct 1870; Cullowhee; 28 Dec; N.E. Bryson; Cullowhee; Betty Ann Frizzle; Webster; A.C. Cope; East LaPorte; Old Field Hyatt, John Ransome; h/o Maude; 1 Jan 1895; Swain Co; 25 Dec; Elias Hyatt; Swain Co; Polly Buchanan; Swain Co; Mrs. John R. Hyatt; ng; Conley's Creek Seay, Luvina; w/o Jess; 27 Feb 1899; Jackson Co; 17 June; Harve Long; Jackson Co; Luvina Morris; Jackson Co; Margaret Tolley; Sylva; Keener Webster Farley, James Sevier; age 82,6,8; NC; not given; W.M. Farley; ng; Frances Conley; ng; W.T. Freeman; ng; Worley Chapel Stillwell, Chas. B.; age 48,4,20; Webster; bur.6 May; J.S. Stillwell; Webster; Martha E. Stillwell; Webster; E.P. Stillwell; Sylva; Stillwell Payne, Thos. Jackson; age 48; died 24 Apr, nothing else given except Stillwell Cemetery Cowan, Nancy; age 80; NC; 19 Jun; ng; NC; nothing else given except Stillwell Cemetery * This date is correct, but the death certificate is filed in the 1928 book. v^ ** The parents' names are slightly wrong on this certificate. The father should be Jim Angell, the mother Huldah Jane Hinshaw. ^ 118 K. Eighty-One Years in God's Wonderful World...The Jessie Miller Cogdill Mathis Story [Ed. The following personal reminiscence is provided to the Jackson County Genealogical Society for printing by Shirley Mathis Beasley, whose gracious permission to use her mother's writings is acknowledged here. Thanks also to JCGS member Brian Wood, who supplied a hard copy for publication.] I have had a lot of pleasure, plenty of trouble and hard work.- The Lord has seen fit to let jme live for 81 years for some purpose.- I am truly sorry I haven't done more for my Lord. I have had a lot of suffering, but the Lord has been with me through it all. My baby sister, Frances, who lives in the 'state of Washington, has always wanted me to write how we lived when I was growing up. I am too near blind now to do much writing. I have been writing things that I can remember for several years. I can remember things that happened when I was young better than I can things that happened last week. The Beginning It all started in Spicewood Cove or it is now known as Hidden Valley. It was a cold, snowy night on January 28,1901, when Jane Cope, a midwife, delivered a redheaded baby girl to John B. and Emeline Miller. They were living in Spicewood Cove, not far. from what is now Ensley's Rest Home. As our young folks say these days, "It was a far out place to live." It was a lovely place to live and grow the finest wheat, corn, and all kinds of vegetables. The first thing I can remember of course was my parents, who loved each other very much and loved their children. We were very poor, but always happy to be together. There were six children older than I. Three boys had died. Two were twins. The first home that I can remember was a very targe one-room log cabin without glass windows, just shutters. It had a stone fireplace that almost reached across one end of the cabin. I imagine you could burn wood five or six feet long. Mama cooked our meals on the fireplace in black iron kettles and a large oven in which she baked our bread. The oven was an oversized skillet with three legs to hold it up off the hearth. She would put red hot coals from the fire under the oven. When she put her dough for the bread in the oven, she put the "lid on. The lid had a rim two or three inches high around the edge. This was to prevent the coals from falling off. She put more red-hot coals on the lid to bake the bread from the top. In a short time she would have some of the most delicious-bread that anyone ever tasted. She also baked potatoes and sweet potatoes in the oven. My Daddy was a hunter. He killed bear, deer, squirrel, rabbit, and groundhog. Mama was the very best when it came to cooking wild meat. During the long winter months when the weather was too bad to get out and do farm work, my Daddy would make axe handles of hickory wodd which he cut and sawed in the right lengths for the handles. He split it up in quarters, then he would bury it in a stream of water to season and make it tough. He also made chairs of ash and maple wood. He made oak splints to bottom the chairs. He made the most beautiful blowing horns. The fox hunters used them to call their dogs in when they were hunting. My Daddy also made me a bed. It was twin size. I always slept alone. I've always been a "loner.^ I thought my bed was the greatest. Mama didn't have much time for anything except keeping house and diapering-babies. The neighbor ladies would join her in making a quilt. The "lazy girl" is the first pattern that I can remember. Times have really changed. I usually make from twenty to thirty-five quilts each year. We have so much more to work with now than they had back then. Our lights were kerosene lamps and lanterns. I can remember when people dried blackberries, apples, peaches, and pumpkin for winter use. There was no jar canning back then. I can remember when we got our first cook stove. It was small but it looked grand to us. We always had a lot of company. Daddy's nephew and two nieces came to live with us. Their parents had died and my parents took them in. I don't remember how long they lived with 119 KJ us, but until they were all married. The nephew, John Mills, married Rebecca Dyer, known to all as "Becky." She was a wonderful person, a good wife, mother, and homemaker. She and John raised six children. One of the nieces married Joe Hoyle. Her name was Martha. Mama said Martha had all her children named before she got married. She named her children like she had planned to. The other girl was Vone. She married Boot Hoyle. I don't remember if they had any children. Daddy's half brother was with us a lot too. He was George Mills. He married Ida Gunter. Uncle George and Aunt Ida were always welcome guests at our house. Clem Woods was there a lot too. He married Mattie Dyer, a neighbor girl. He had been married before, and had two daughters, Sadie and Flora. We played with them and had a lot of fun. The first music I can remember was Clem's banjo. He knew how to handle the banjo to make beautiful music. About this time we had a new house built. It was made of wide boards with three large rooms. It had a chimney at each end and a wide porch all the way across the front. We had pure spring water and an orchard of peaches and apples. Also a chestnut orchard. When I was about six years old, we moved to Gastonia. Uncle George, Aunt Ida, Martha and Bell Hoyle went with us. There was Bill, Minnie, and Essie older than I. Nettie and Bob were younger. Daddy and Mama had quite a job looking after all of us on a trip. Uncle George and Aunt Ida were looking after me. It was after night when we got off the train. I was half asleep. A colored man and woman came along. This man was wearing an overcoat. Uncle George was also wearing an overcoat. I followed the colored couple when we left the train. I was scared to death but they were very nice. They knew what hotel my folks were going to. It was probably the only hotel in Gastonia at that time. They took me straight to my folks, who were worried about their little redhead. We didn't get to stay in Gastonia long. Mama got sick and we had to come back home. We didn't have many doctors back then. The babies were delivered by a midwife. We used Epsom salts, castor oil, turpentine, and Japanese oil, a sure cure for anything including tummy ache. When we got a case of poison oak, we put Arm and Hammer baking soda in buttermilk and >^_J it worked and still does. As long as I can remember, we had Arm and Hammer baking soda. That is one thing that hasn't changed. We had Lenox laundry soap and Gold Dust washing powder in a yellow box with the picture of a cute little girl on the box. Before wash boards were invented, we had to rub our clothes by hand. We would lay them on a smooth block or stump and paddle them with a wooden paddle. They called it battling the clothes. They would then put them in a large iron pot and boil them. They were really clean. The clothes were ironed by heating the old-fashioned iron before the open fire or heating it on the stove. Churning was a chore. The fresh milk from the cow was poured into a stone jar where it was allowed to "ripen" or sour. Then it was churned by hand until butter was made. The butter was taken out and molded for table use. The buttermilk was the best. Back then a refrigerator had not been heard of. People kept their milk and butter in a spring box. This was a wood box set in the water by the spring to keep things cold. The spring was a natural stream of cold water that came out of the earth. Children didn't have toys back in those days, except for rag dolls made by the mother. We had a few games we played like "hide and seek" or "stealing grapes." This was a game where two lines of kids were lined up facing each other. A kid from one side would say, "What are you doing over there"? A kid from the other side would say "Stealing grapes." One from the opposite side would ask, "What would you do if the Bogeyman came"? They would yell, "get home if I can." They would scramble to change lines. We thought it was fun. My sister Essie was playing that I was her cow. She tied me. I must have started through a door and she did not want me to go. She jerked me against the door casing and bruised my neck. A big knot came on my neck. Seymour and Bill Calhoun were there one day, and Daddy wanted to lance my neck. I ran off, but they finally got ahold of me. With Bill and Seymour helping, they lanced my neck. By some miracle, I lived. \y 120 ^ u Nettie and I decided we wanted to learn to dip snuff. It made us sick as a buzzard at first, but we were getting used to it. It didn't make us sick any more. We "stole" a good supply of snuff from Mama and decided to get where no one would see us and just have ourselves a ball. We got up on a big log in a swamp below thehouse and were sure no one would ever know. Unfortunately Mama had been picking blackberries. She spied us and landed on us with a spicewood switch. You know the rest. Neither one of us has ever wanted any more snuff. We will thank her until the day we die. The tax collector in our neck of the woods was Bob Blackwell. He rode a big black stallion. He came to our house one day and while he was in the house I unhitched the stallion and was ready to take a ride when Bill, bless him, rescued me. I would probably have been killed. The" Lord has seen fit to let me live for something. School Days My first day in school was in Beta graded school. Cling Ensley was my first teacher. Bill was the oldest one of the family. -Minnie was next, then Essie and I. We had to walk to school. We only had a four months school back then. We tried to learn all we could, which wasn't much. In those days, people didn't seem to think that an education was too important. Parents would keep their children out of school to help with the farm work. (This was) such as picking beans and pulling fodder. This was stripping the corn blades from the stalk. It was tied in small loose bundles and Hung on the corn stalk to dry. The top part of the com had been cut off above the ear. The tops, it was called, were set up in shocks to dry for feed for the livestock in .the winter. The way it was stacked, the men put a tall slender pole well into the ground. They started to stack by putting the tops around the pole in a circle, then they put the fodder on, tapering off with each layer till it was very narrow at the top, so the rain and snow would run down the outside of the stack. The feed underneath would be nice and dry all winter. Getting back to school. We carried our. lunch in a gallon tin bucket with a tight-fitting lid. Mama, would put biscuits filled with butter and jam or jelly, boiled com on the cob and tomatoes. Anything she put in that bucket tasted good at "dinner recess." We had to pass by a neighbor's house. She had plenty of cucumbers. She offered us some "cowcumbers" for our lunch but Minnie did not know she meant cucumbers, so she told her we didn't like them. Of. course we all loved them. My second teacher was Miss Bertie Henson. She was a beautiful lady. My next teacher was Miss Nannie Frizzell. All her students dearly loved her. She was wonderful. She lived until 1975. Threshing day was a big event back in the cove. The men who owned a threshing machine moved it from one farm to another to thresh.wheat and rye. I can't describe a threshing machine, but it must have been a weird-looking contraption. As well as I can remember, it was a small machine which was taken from farm to farm by a team of horses, mules, or oxen. An ox is a gentleman cow, trained to work like a horse. It was a big day when the threshers came to the farm. The men would go out to find out when the threshers were coming. The women folks would start killing chickens and cooking all kinds of goodies. It was a real celebration. I recall once when they came to our hduse, Mama cooked a hen. When the men came to eat dinner,'Tom Hunnicutt was looking for the gizzard. He was very fond of gizzards, but so was my sister Minnie. She had eaten the gizzard before it came to the table. When Tom looked for it, some of the kids told-him that Minnie had eaten i t I don't think she ever lived it down. I suppose parents have always had some embarassing moments. Bob, my brother, was a small boy. One day he was behind a door, just crying his heart jout. Daddy asked him what was wrong. He said he hadn't seen his uncle David Thomas in a long time. We didn't know anyone by that name. I can remember pretty far back, but not as far as my nephew Wayne Miller can. 121 He said he could remember the day his Daddy was born. He said Grandma cooked a chicken that day. We moved from Hidden Valley to Fisher Creek. My Daddy and brother Bill worked at a Ky sawmill. We didn't live there long. Some of our neighbors were Mr. Jim Reed, Joe Ensley, Billy Jarrett Fisher, Wilson Ensley, and Wibb Fisher. Daddy then rented the William Allen farm at Beta. We lived in an old house on top of the hill where the Greene family live. The hill has been cut down and leveled off. Looks like a different place. The space where they have their trailer park was a big frog pond. There was no water near the house. We had to carry water from the Allen home, which is now Sam Sanford's home, or across the railroad trestle over the Lee Bumgarner way to a spring by the railroad. It ran a very small stream. We had to keep a bucket there to catch the water so we wouldn't have to wait so long. It was a hard life for all of us back in those days. But as long as we were together, we didn't complain. We were as happy as a millionaire. We were near the Scotts Creek Baptist Church and school. I went to school four months without missing a day. Homer Cope and I were the only ones who didn't miss a day. Minnie, my oldest sister, got married to Everett Clayton of Hendersonville. (Minnie died December 3, 1967.) We lived near the old mill which burned a few years ago. A colored man by the name of Neil Knox operated the mill which was owned by the Allen family. He really knew his business. He ground corn meal and grits, wheat flour, and whole wheat flour. It was all the very best. Daddy got a longing for a more "fur out" place to live, so we landed on the head of Buff Creek, a place known as the Miller place. The property was owned by Thad Bryson of Beta. The house was a big old shack which had been used for a boarding house, but it was "home" for us. It was a real thrill for us kids. We had a real playground. We had to walk 3 or 4 miles to church and the grocery store. Nettie and I would pick blackberries and carry them to Addie for 10 cents per gallon. You could buy dress material for 10 cents a yard that would make a pretty decent dress. Trouble was we didn't have enough dresses. It was a rough life for us all. Our Dad and brothers made acid wood in the winter and peeled tan bark in summer from chestnut oak -J trees. Nettie and I would carry tan bark to the road to be loaded on a wagon and would pitch acid wood down the mountain to the road. My oldest sister, Essie, usually stayed away from home. She was then staying with the Sam Cook family at Rocky Face. She was later married to their foster son Raymond Mull. We split rails from chestnut logs and used these to make a fence around our crop and let our cows "run wild." They could go for miles in any direction. When it came time to milk them, we had to drive them home to be milked. The cow hunting was always my job. Nettie or Bob would go with me. One afternoon late, Nettie and I were looking for the cows in the "Waycaster" field. We found a big rattlesnake under a log. We forgot about the cows and went for Bill to come and kill the snake. The men folks and some other men we had hired were covering or putting a roof on our house with shingles made of oak by Mr. Jasper Pannell. Everyone .was busy that morning. I went cow hunting alone "snakes and all." I had to track them. They got smart and stood still to keep from ringing the bells which they wore around their necks. I got back with the cows at 11:00 that day. No one thought of looking for me. They knew I'd find them before I came back. There was a lot of "white lightning" made back then. I never saw a still, but our cows, free as a bird, found one and took on a taste of still beer, so they both pitched one. They were staggering and falling. Dad said they were poisoned on he-huckleberry bushes. Funny, they ran in them all the time and this was the only time it ever happened. They sent me to a neighbor's house to get some homemade lard and eggs to "drench" them. In other words, put the lard and eggs in a long-necked bottle and pour it down their throats. The joke was on us. We didn't use the milk for a couple of days and after a "hangover" our cows were as good as new. We were getting a lot of ground cleaned off and planting more crop each year. We grew the finest cabbage and turnips as well as corn and all kind of vegetables. My baby sister Frances N / 122 c o was bom while .we were living there. She is now Frances Jones and is living in the state of Washington. Essie was married to Raymond Mull while we lived there. She went home to be with the Lord July 29, 1965. How we miss her. We had been living here about six years. We were getting pretty well established or homesteaded when along came John Mills, Daddy's nephew, who had been living in the state of Washington for a while. He was looking for a place to live. He settled down on the Jim Blythe farm on Soco, the,Cherokee Indian reservation. After living there a few months, he came up and talked Daddy into moving down there also. We too moved to the Jim Blythe farm on Soco. That proved to be a very rewarding experience for us in many ways. We found the Cherokees to be a well-educated people. They were very friendly and always nice to us. The worst part for us, there was no school for white children nearer than Whittier. We had no way of getting there, so there were three of us kids out of school for the two-year period that we lived there. Cars were as scarce as hen's teeth back then. Jarrett and Mary Blythe lived there on the farm. Jarrett had a good wagon and team of mules. We went by wagon where we went. We went to Cherokee to ballgames and to the Indian Fair. .Back in those days the Indian Fair was really something to see. They had fine stock and poultry, all kinds of produce, canned goods, jelly, and jam. The ladies would have,the finest hand work you could find anywhere on exhibit, and the baskets they could make were unbelievable. They were so beautiful. The Olivet Methodist Church was the nearest white church around. The Cherokee people had converted an old log dwelling house into a church. It was near our home, so we attended church there. The pastor was Bird Saloneeta. We attended church every Sunday for months. Although we couldn't understand a word of Cherokee language, I knew we were benefitted spiritually. The Indian women wore their bandannas on their heads and most of them wore long dresses. We would usually take a seat near the back of the church. They would always have their time of fellowship and handshaking every Sunday. The most of the members would come back and shake our hands. In 1918 a white missionary couple-came to hold a revival meeting.' They were ReV. and Mrs. Joseph N. Lee. My brother Bill, sister Nettie, and I were saved during the revival in Macedonia Baptist Church and were baptized by Rev. Lee in Soco Creek. Later they built a beautiful rock church that is now Macedonia Baptist Church. Bob grew up and married Alice Norris from Glenville. Alice died of measles February 20,1949. Bob died of cancer in the state of Washington and is buried mere. We lived on Soco for two years. Bill was married to Gertie Nations. Their first daughter, Willia Mae, was bom while we lived on Soco. Bill was a good hard-working boy. Had many friends. He died October 8, 1949, at Marble, NC. In 1918 we moved back to the same place on Buff Creek. World War I was in full swing. Before we got our meat and canned goods nioved from Soco, part of our family was stricken with that awful flu. Mama and Frances didn't take it at all and I was the last one to take it. I was lucky enough to stay up and help with the rest of the family. On November 11,1918, it struck me like a ton of bricks with pneumonia. It barely left life in me. I was in bed for twelve weeks. I had to learn to walk when I finally got up. Our neighbors, Mr. And Mrs. Jasper Pannell, Rev. and Mrs. Bob Cook, Mrs. Zeb Cook, and others carried food to us and were really nice to us. There had never been a car up there. Bill would take a horse to Addie and meet "Big Doc," Dr. Asbury Nichols, and bring him up to treat me. My Daddy was a great mountain man. He knew the Balsam mountains like a book. He loved to bear hunt, so he could almost find one in our back yard. He was lucky enough to kill several bear and deer and also small game. We would go all over the mountains with him. Nettie, Bob, and I would pick huckleberries with our Daddy. We would go to Black Rock. I have been to the top of Black Rock many times. Also, Table Rock, White Rock Ridges, Yellow Face, Drink Rock. We were very familiar with all these places. 123 Ky I went to Addie to the store one day. Hute Snyder and Bob Fisher both owned a general store. Winnie Cogdill was postmistress. Cal Clayton was station master at the Addie depot. These businesses made up the town of Addie. On my way home this day, I had to pass Estes Bryson's home. Their oldest daughter, Nettie, a school teacher, wanted to go home with me. Her mother let her go. So after we ate our dinner, or lunch as people call it now, Nettie wanted to go to White Rock Ridges. It was three or four or more miles up there. My mother and dad would allow me to do almost anything I wantd to do, so Nettie and I, armed with a walking stick, were on our way to White Rock Ridges. By some miracle we made it there and back alive. There were bobcats and a lot of wold beasts. It's a wonder we didn't get chewed up by some wild animal. The Lord was with us, no doubt about it. Nettie wouldn't tell her parents where we had been. Her mother wouldn't let her come to my house again. She thought the walk was too much for her. They didn't know about the extra three to five miles we had walked. My parents would always make people feel welcome. Jim Cogdill, the man I later married, was a welcome visitor at our house, but little did I think at that time that I would ever be married to anyone. My health was bad, but I suppose it improved over the years. January 1976 is almost gone. Time is really flying. It seems impossible that I have been living in this big wonderful world for 75 years and have lived on North Fork for 53 years. 1975 was a good year for me. No serious sickness or death in our immediate family. I have always greeted each new year with a lot of pep and determination to do the best I can, but this year caught me off guard. The old pep is getting weaker each year. Not very many young women did more work than I did during 1975. I made up in 30 quilts, made a big garden, planted and hoed com and beans, canned several hundred cans of fruit and vegetables, jam, and jelly, filled a large freezer, made a lot of kraut and pickled beans, raised some chickens. Of course Adam helped a lot. My only regret is being out of church so much. I hope I can have better health this year and do something worthwhile, like doing something for the Lord and my fellow man. 1976 will soon be gone. It is December 12,1976. I wish people would celebrate Christmas like they did when I was a child. We hung our stockings by the fireplace on Christmas v, /* Eve night, hoping Santa would fill them to the brim. When we found an orange, an apple, some nuts and peppermint stick candy in our stockings on Christmas morning, we were really happy. Children these days get so much, they don't appreciate what they get. I remember one Christmas when I was a kid that eggs were hard to get during winter months and when you could buy them, they were high-priced. Mama could make extra-good cakes. So it was just a few days before Christmas, and Mama told us we wouldn't have any cakes for Christmas because she had no eggs. It came a snow and I had to go to our spring to get a bucket of water. I saw hen tracks in the snow, so I looked under a log and there were eggs. We had cakes after all. Nettie was younger than I but she got married to Zeb Parris. They moved to Gastonia. I went down and tried working in a cotton mill but I couldn't take the lint. I was soon back home. In 1924 a man from P.H. Hanes Knitting Company in Winston-Salem came through here looking for girls to work. Essie was married then but she went with me. Winnie and Annie Cogdill and Fannie McClure also went. I worked there making mens longhandled underwear for six months. I was a little homesick. When I came home I found Mama in bad health, so I wouldn't go back and was always glad that I didn't. Mama died December 4, 1924. I stayed home to help Daddy. There were Bob, Martha, and Frances. I tried to be mother to the kids and did the best I could with the housekeeping. My parents had moved from Buff Creek to North Fork while I was in Winston-Salem. Four Young People Decide to Take Over the Law For a Day It all started when some men who were making moonshine started handing out their makings to the wrong man. A son, we'll call him Wayne, and a daughter, Willia, decided something needed to be done, so they asked willing partners to help them. Fannie McClure and Frances Miller first got the bright idea of turning "revenoors" and went to work. It was raining *y 124 cats and dogs this special day. The four, armed with each other and a German police dog, set out / to do their best. They went "fur" back in the woods to find what they were looking for, a W* blockade still, in running order and ready for a batch of the "real McCoy." The barrels which held their mash were buried in the ground with only the top showing. They dipped this beer (com meal and sugar) out and whitewashed the trees all around with it. They tore down the furnace which was built with stone like a chimney. They put the stones in the barrels and captured the still. They beat and banged it up all they could, then carried orrolled it a mile or two and put it in a flume, a v-shaped box with running water, used to float Balsam or spruce wood out of the mountains to the highway at the end of North Fork Creek. The fellows suffered a big loss as well as wounded pride, but they finally recovered. May 13,1977 A lot has happened since I last wrote. I notice my last writing was December 12, 1976. On December 14,1 had to go to the emergency room in Sylva, then I was moved to Asheville Memorial Mission where I had a pacemaker installed on December! 7. It all seems like a horrible dream, but here I am doing a lot of work. Have quilted four quilts and made seventeen quilt tops. I am so thankful to be able to work at age 76. Getting back to my young days, Jim Cogdill and I were married on January 1, 1927. We really, had a bad start. I owned six ducks and two red heifers. He owned around a hundred sheep, a black horse, a gray mule, a good wagon, some thoroughbred Hampshire hogs, and some chickens. He owed R.G. Snyder a thousand dollars, and when his bank statement came on February 1, he* owed the bank two cents. We had a pretty miserable old shack to live in, but we had love. May 28,1977 I had taken orders for Lee Manufacturing Company and earned a lot of premiums. I had a barrel full of dishes, pots and pans, and silverware. I had some quilts that I had made and Lj several dozen cans that I had filled. Jim had two large Hampshire hogs ready to butcher. He had a bed, a cot, and a small #8 stove. We made us a table b y Mr. Annis Frady helping us. I made a cupboard in the comer of the kitchen for my dishes. Things looked pretty hopeless to say the least, but we worked together. We had been married a month or two when things started looking better. Jim, Jeter Snyder, and Bob Long bought a big boundary of spruce timber. They built a flume to float the wood from the top and over the back of Yellow Face. They used a skidder on top of the mountain to bring the wood up from the back side. They had a tram road from the top of Yellow Face several miles down the mountain where the wood was transferred to the flume and was floated to the highway at the mouth of North Fork Creek. They had a camp on top of Yellow Face for the men to stay. They really put a lot of men to work. The men came in droves looking for a job. I usually cooked dinner for from two or three tceight or ten. On November 11,1927, our baby girl was bom dead. We were so disappointed at losing her, and it was hard to understand why the Lord wanted her, but He always knows best. On August 25,1929, our son James T. Jr. was bom. We were so proud of him and I still am. He is a Baptist minister. His father's stay with us was very short. Jim died in a Charlotte hospital November 3,1932. I couldn't understand why the Lord took him and left me, but I am still here for some purpose. April 29,1978 I was a widow for two years. I was remarried to Adam Mathis on November 4,1934. We have four children, three boys and a girl. Harold, our oldest son, passed away in a hospital in Gainesville, Florida December 16,1971. Noel died July 5,1973. How I mis"s both of my boys. They were both 35 years old at death. Shirley, our only daughter, married Jim Beasley, and they adopted a baby boy. We are very proud of all our grandchildren. Glenn married Dorothy L^ Stewart They have a daughter Tammy and a son Martin. Harold was married to Shirley 125 Ky Carnes of Cincinnati, Ohio. Thay have one daughter, Judy Rae. Noel married Jo Ann Melton. They have two daughters, Linda Ann and Noelene. Linda Ann is married to Ronnie Reed. She has two daughters, Amanda and Deneen. Linda has a son, Joshua. Note from Shirley Mathis Beasley This is the last writing my Mom did. She became very sick and spent a lot of time in the hospital. She died October 15,1982. Editor's Note: Because of the generosity of the Beasley, Cogdill, and Mathis families in allowing JCGS to use the foregoing reminiscences, we provide the following genealogical notes for this family. Jessie Bryson Miller was bom January 28,1901, the seventh child of John B. Miller and his wife Nicy Amy Emeline Parris Miller. John B. Miller was bom May 6,1861, oldest son of William Miller, who would die in the Civil War, and his wife Martha Ann Clayton. Nicy Amy Emeline Parris was bom April 12,1871, fifth child of Alfred Washington Parris and his wife Laura Louisa Conner. Martha Ann Clayton was bom February 8,1841, second child of George W. Clayton and his wife Artie Elvira Bryson. Alfred Washington Parris was bom in 1840, eighth child of James Parris and Amy McEntire. Laura Louisa Conner was bom February 21,1841, second child of David Conner and his wife Ky Nicy Branton. George W. Clayton was bom October 15,1816, third child of John Clayton and Elizabeth Neill. Artie Elvira Bryson was bom December 29,1821, third child of Daniel Granderson Bryson and his wife Artemesia Petit Dillard. James Parris was bom August 16,1805, fourth child of David Parris and his wife Mary Marr. (possibly Morrow) Amy McEntire was bom April 8,1808, a daughter of James McEntire and his wife Lucretia. John Clayton was bom February 5,1788, a son of George Clayton and his wife Margaret Thompson. Elizabeth Neill was bom in 1790, a daughter of Robert Neill and his wife Margaret Clayton. Daniel Granderson Bryson was bom May 23, 1787, a son of James Holmes Bryson and his wife Sarah Countryman. Artemesia Petit Dillard was bom September 9,1791, a daughter of Thomas Dillard and his wife Dorcas Love. 126 Ky Jackson County Delayed Birth Certificates of Persons Born Before 1900 w / [Key: Page No.Name, date of birth, place of birth, father's name, father's year of birth, father's place of birth, mother's name, mother's year of birth, mother's place of birth. ] [Ed. All of the following can be found in Vol.2. Abstracted June 1997 by Larry Crawford] 202 Bumgarner, Walter Lindsay, 4 Sep 1892, Dillsboro, Lindsay Bumgarner, 1867, Jackson Co.. Emma Calhoun, 1867, Jackson Co. 203 Bumgarner, John Seymour, 9 May 1897, Dillsboro, Lindsay Bumgarner, 1867, Jackson Co., Emma Calhoun, 1867, Jackson Co. 207 Sutton, Dona Elizabeth, 15 Aug 1884, Wilmot, John Sutton, 1840, Jackson Co., Mary E. Cockerham, 1846, Jackson Co. 211 Frizzell, Charlie, 9 Aug 1897, Webster, John Frizzell, 1874, Jackson Co., Elizabeth Cabe. 1882, Jackson Co. 227 Keller, William Harry, 19 May 1893, Cullowhee, William Harry Keller, 1847, PA, Rebecca Bryson, 1857, Jackson Co. 229 Frady, Harvey Jackson, 9 May 1897, Webster, Ruben Frady, 1875, Jackson Co., Florence Stillwell, 1880, Jackson Co. 230 Bumgarner,-Lewis Wilburn, 15 Jun 1898, Sylva, John Wesley Bumgarner, 1859, Jackson Co., Mary Long, 1862, Haywood Co. > 239 Jones, Thomas Alonzo, 6 Aug 1894, Addie, Jdhn L. Jones, 1870, Jackson Co., Dona Brooks, 1878, Jackson Co. 256 Hastings, Annie Margaret, 5 Apr 1895, Dillsboro, Thomas H. Hastings, 1853, TN. Ebbie Moore, 1860, TN 257 Wilson, Ernest Willie, 13 May 1894, Glenville, Alfred Houston Wilson, 1840, Jackson Co., Laura Hazeltine Bryson, 1852, Macon Co. ^ 258 Watson, Gracy May, 6 May 1899, Sylva, Lucius M. Watson, 1870, Jackson Co., Estella Garrett, 1874, Jackson Co. 261 Bumgardner, Miles Vernon, 26 Jun 1897, Cullowhee, Charlie Bumgardner, 1867, Jackson Co., Susan Holden, 1870, Swain Co. 266 Ashe, Charlie Hampton, 25 Dec 1897, Greens Creek, Asberry Burton Ashe, 1864, Jackson Cq., Mary Jane Brooks-, J 863, Jackson Co.. 268 Coward, Jane BL, 16 Jan 1898, Webster, Nathan Coward, 1818, Jackson Co., Sophia Hedden, 1869, Rabun Co. GA 269 Sutton, Johnnie Vester, 14 Aug 1898, Savannah, Coleman David Sutton, 1876, Jackson Co., Luetta Bryson, 1874, Jackson Co. 270 Monteith, Wilburn Oscar, 11 Feb 1887, Glenville, William Wessley Monteith, 1864, Jackson Co., Sarah Jamison,' 1865, Jackson Co. 271 Crawford, Leroy, 27 May 1884, Addie, Mack Crawford, 1861, Jackson Co., Cordelia Ensley, 1865, Jackson Co. 279 McLaughlin, WiUiam Swinfleld, 28 Nov 1885, Sylva, William A. McLaughlin, 1849, TN, Mara Howell, 1852, Jackson Co. 289 Blanton, John W., 4 Jul 1879, Sylva, William R. Blanton, 1847, Jackson Co., Depina A. Ensley, 1850, Jackson Co. 290 Blanton, George ML, 30 Apr 1875, Sylva, William R. Blanton, 1847, Jackson Co., Depina Ensley, 1850, Jackson* Co. 292 Berry, Joseph Homer, 5 Dec 1872, Webster, William C. Berry, 1822, not given, Martha Jane Watkins, 1843, Nashville, TN 296 Buchanan, Walter Lee, 20 Sep 1896, Wilmot, Thadeus Mack Buchanan, 1872, Buncombe Co., Lula Coleman, unknown, Buncombe Co. 127 Jackson County Delayed Birth Certificates, Continued 306 Robinson, Griffin Jackson, 4 Apr 1896, Glenville, Kit Robinson, 1865, Jackson Co., Julia KJ Wike, 1873, Jackson Co. 308 Fisher, Carrey Boot, 9 Mar 1882, Sylva, Callie Fisher, 1864, Jackson Co., Maggie Bryson, 1869, Jackson Co. 311 Higdon, Robert Lee, 28 Apr 1894, Gay, Will Higdon, 1853, Jackson Co., Harriett Woodard, 1861, Jackson Co. 314 Seigle, Marion Leondis, 12 Dec 1897, Barker's Creek, Thomas Seigle, 1876, Madison Co., Maggie Bradley, 1878, Jackson Co. 329 Norton, Oscar Lee, 28 Feb 1890, Cullowhee, William C. Norton, 1857, Jackson Co., Sallie Coward, 1864, Jackson Co. 331 Queen, Fanny Ethel, 29 Jul 1886, Wolf Mountain, William A. Queen, 1858, Jackson Co., Mary Lavina Price, 1860, Jackson Co. 332 Queen, Benjamin Nelson, 21 Sep 1888, Wolf Mountain, William Alonzo Queen, 1858, Jackson Co., Mary Lavina Price, 1860, Jackson Co. 333 Queen, Kansas Lavena, 1 Oct 1894, Tuckaseigee, William Alonzo Queen, 1858, Jackson Co., Mary Lavina Price, 1860, Jackson Co. 334 Queen, Mary Annabell, 29 Nov 1882, Wolf Mountain, William Alonzo Queen, 1858, Jackson Co., Mary Lavina Price, 1860, Jackson Co. 337 Monteith, Hugh Edwin, 5 Sep 1898, Dillsboro, Samuel H. Monteith, 1876, Jackson Co., Ida Fisher, 1879, Jackson Co. 345 Henson, Burke Madison, 31 Dec 1897, Cullowhee, Samuel W. Henson, 1866, Jackson Co., Miley Watson, 1872, Jackson Co. 348 Jones, Ida Victoria, 21 Jul 1891, Gay, David Coleman Jones, 1862, Jackson Co., Ernest Theodocia Woodard, 1864, Jackson Co. 350 Davis, John Whitfield, 5 Mar 1883, East LaPorte, Javan Davis, 1841, Jackson Co., Ellen y^J McFee, 1846, Greenville Co. SC Volume 3 006 Deitz, Rufus Herman, 28 Apr 1889, Webster, William Hamilton Deitz, 1847, Macon Co., Martha Monday, 1860, Knox Co.TN 025 Franklin, Elias Raymond, 18 Jan 1897, Sylva, Elias David Franklin, 1869, Jackson Co., Virginia Hoyle, 1874, Swain Co. 027 Barnes, Callie Mae, 10 Jul 1899, Sylva, Clinton Barnes, 1873, Demorest GA, Belle Harris, 1876, Jackson Co. 042 Duncan, Garland Sylvester, 4 Jun 1893, Balsam, Jesse Elbert Duncan, 1859, Jackson Co., Mary Magdiline Blanton, 1857, Balsam Jackson Co 045 Zachary, Walter Bulen, 5 May 1886, Cashiers, Alexander W. Zachary, unknown, Cashiers Jackson Co., Elizabeth A. Bryson, 1841, Cullasaja Macon Co. 046 Tilley, Charlie Osborne, 4 Jan 1893, Speedwell, George Ausburn Tilley, 1857, Jackson Co., Sarah Anne Pressley, 1866, Jackson Co. 048 Keener, James S., 31 Mar 1878, Scotts Creek, John S. Keener, 1841, Scotts Creek Jackson Co., Francis C. Hix, 1846, Cripple Creek VA 051 Ensley, James Blaine, 13 Sep 1891, Sylva, John Bowen Ensley, 1862, Jackson Co., Mary Queen, 1865, Jackson Co. 055 Franks, John Thomas, 9 Nov 1893, Gay, Jim H. Franks, 1870, Macon Co., Ella Scott, 1874, Madison Co. 056 Ashe, Robert Amos, 20 Apr 1878, Whittier, Coleman Ashe, 1851, Jackson Co., Arzelia Enloe, not given, Jackson Co. *^_J 128 / Odyssey.. .In Search of Preacher Billy's Bible [Ed. The following is the first-person account of JCGS member Jean Crawford Brown, whose principal genealogical interests are the Crawford, Briscoe, and Brown families. We print it here, along with the fabulous result of Jean's quest.] It has been some years since I began to pursue genealogy in more than a perfunctory way, and I have known some triumphs and some crushing disappointments—such as are common to all who claim this hobby for their own—as I searched among the oft-tangled roots of my particular tree. I chose to concentrate on the family name of my father: Crawford; as much out of the joy of memories of hearing older ones of the family talk as, truth to telf, a bit of laziness because I thought it would be easier than some other family lines. I seem to hear the sounds of the more experienced among you chuckling...NONE OFTHEM ARE EASY. At first, I had some marvelous successes. I had known, after all, that our Crawford ancestors came to the mountains of North Carolina from Rutherford County with the arrival of my fourth great-grandfather Samuel and his wife Mary in or about 1820. And since my great-great grandmother Adelaide lived to be 96 or so, I had the deepest respect for the veracity of her claim that Samuel was a child of John. If only she could have been persuaded to tell or to write Samuel's wife's maiden name, I might never have had an odyssey to describe. The search for the maiden name of Samuel's wife Mary eventually took me to St. Mary's County, Maryland, on two different occasions, but those are" not the particular bdyssey I have in mind. I was able to place a Mary in the correct place in the family of Briscoe, a descendant of one Dr. John Briscoe who came to America in -1634 as the ship's surgeon with the original expedition of The Ark and the Dove. What I could not do was prove that Samuel Crawford, son . of John, had married Mary Briscoe, daughter of Nathan, who had settled in Rutherford County \ ^ in the early 1780's, but I wanted a marriage bond or Bible record, neither of which, for all my efforts, was forthcoming. A positively identified son of Samuel and Mary Crawford, Rev. William R. Crawford, was my third"great-grandfather. Preacher Billy had signed the petition to form Jackson County • from Haywood and Macon Counties, and he had been a man of some property and some civic responsibility. He served Jackson County on the first Board of Commissioners, helped survey the town of Bryson City, pastored many local Baptist churches, and seemed, from the wording of his will, to be an erudite man. I decided that if I could find his family Bible, he might very well have indicated his mother's maiden name. Once the notion occurred to me, I knew that I would never be content, genealogically speaking, until I had seen that Bible, always assuming that one existed, for myself. Thus, after digression, my odyssey. After some considerable search, I had to face the fact that no one I knew among the Billy and his wife Olif Varina Hemphill, descendants had his Bible, nor did they know where it might be located. I had, however, heard my grandfather speak of his great aunt, Varina Carletta, (Billy's and Olif s youngest child) who had moved with her family to the state of Washington just after the turn of the century. She had inherited the family's grand piano via Billy's will, but since it measures approximately four by seven feet, it would not have been a very practical item tomove to the west coast. .Her father's Bible", however, might well have made the journey with little or no inconvenience. I believed my reasoning to be sound, but the families were no longer in touch with each other; Some playing with dates convinced me that there could be living grandchildren of Carletta and her husband, Rev. Henry Deck Welch,-but how on the round earth was I to find them? There was nothing for it but to travel to the state of Washington. Some of you may contend that to be an extreme measure in this day of modem communication, but since my family ^ / has other relatives (with whom we have stayed in touch) living in western Washington, my 129 Ky brother and I set forth, in the summer of 1992, to visit with them and to find Welch descendants. My brother cautioned me that I must not get my hopes too high, and for the first few days of our trip, it seemed that he had been correct. All I had to show for several days of hard work was one record from Lyman, Washington Elementary School, which contained the names of three of Deck and Carletta's children. But, blessed be the telephone! In near desperation, I searched the telephone directory for anyone whose last name was Welch still living in Lyman. I found exactly one. Thank Providence for an elderly man who was willing to listen to my stumbling explanation for calling him and asking if he might perchance be a descendant of Rev. Henry Deck and Carletta Crawford Welch. His answer was no, but my heart began to beat again when he said that his grandfather Vance was a brother of Deck Welch, if that would help me. He told me many stories of the family, how four of the Welch brothers came to Washington, how one of them founded the Welch Grape Juice Company and later sold it, and how Rev. Henry Deck Welch was killed in an automobile accident in 1927. Best of all, he was able to direct me to a grandson of Deck and Carletta's who lived in Anacortes. Loren Welch is a son of John S. Welch, Deck and Carletta's oldest son, and his wife Nancy Baker Welch. He and his wife were leaving early the next morning on a trip, but he gave me the name and telephone number of a first cousin who knew the most about the family. I was able to meet with Ruth Whitley Rice, who admitted to being in her eighties, and so enjoyed one of the most fulfilling times I have known as an amateur genealogist and as a human being. She was, and is, a delightful lady, and the joy she felt at contact with her grandmother's family was a beautiful thing. Among other facts, we learned of the existence of one more child of Deck and Carletta, their youngest daughter Tessie. When I broached the subject of a family Bible, she said there was indeed an old Bible in the family, but she was not sure if it had been in the Welch family or the Crawford family. When she also said that her grandparents had been living with Carletta's mother when Olif died in 1900,1 felt sure the Bible was the one I wanted so much to see. \y You may imagine how I felt when Ruth Rice gave me this information: she had begun to give family items to various cousins, nieces, and nephews, since she is childless. She had given the Bible to Gary Loren, son of Loren with whom I had spoken, and his company had transferred him to Denver about six months before my visit. Both Ruth and Gary's father assured me that Gary would not be averse to my calling him and asking about the family heirloom, and I did exactly that when we returned home from our trip. Gary told me as much as he knew about the old book and invited me to visit him whenever I could get to Denver. He did not think the pages could be photocopied successfully, and he found the script rather difficult to read. He was able to give me the birthdate of Grandmother Olif and tell me of a child bom to Andrew Jackson Crawford and his wife Minerva Sutton. He found no record of Preacher Billy's mother in the family record pages; however, he assured me that I could look at the book to my heart's content if I came to visit. At long last, I have made the second part of my odyssey. My sister Ruth and I returned in August from a driving trip to Salt Lake City where we worked in the LDS library. Need I say that we also drove home by way of Denver? We spent some wonderful days in the home of Gary and Kathy Welch, whom we had not previously met but who we knew at once were FAMILY. Some things we know with the mind; some things, the heart. Gary is a third cousin once removed to Ruth and me, but time and distance have not obliterated some familiar family characteristics. Gary is a great story teller, and one of his favorite themes is his much-loved grandfather, John S. Welch, who told his grandchildren stories about the North Carolina mountains. The Bible I had wanted to examine was waiting for me in Gary's living room. When I opened the book to the front cover and angled it so that I could read the dim script written there, I admit without shame that my eyes filled with tears. "William R. Crawford His Book" is faint but legible. \y 130 c o I offer the record from that family Bible to'any of you who are interested. You may remember that I started the search because I hoped to find Preacher Billy's mother's maiden name somewhere within its pages. I regret that is not the case, although I literally went through it page by page by page. I did find friendship and family and as warm a welcome as anyone could ever hope to find, and I found another mystery to keep me interested in researching the Crawford family. A young son was bom in 1860 to Andrew Jackson and his wife Minerva Sutton Crawford. The child was named William Russell. Andy was killed in the battle of Malvern Hill in 1862 and Minerva later remarried. When Gary first told me about this child's birth, I assumed that he had died, since I had never heard of him. He may not have survived infancy, but I now know there is no record of his death in the pages' of this meticulously kept book. What happened to that little child? I am left with my original quandary as well. I am still unable to prove a marriage between Samuel Crawford and Mary Briscoe. To some, my trips west may seem a defeat since I am no closer to proving the marriage than I have ever been, and there are those who claim that Samuel Crawford married Mary somebody-else, anyway. They may be correct, but until I see proof, I rely on my own research. To others who have made their own odysseys in search of a link with the past, I need not try to explain the feeling I had when* I knew I was holding my great-great- great grandfather's Bible; suffice it to say, that feeling was far from defeat. I can also treasure the good memories I have stored from meeting a few o f Deck and Carletta Welch's descendants, and relish re-establishing contact between two branches of a family who had been separated for almost a century. I think my odyssey was a smashing success. The William R. Crawford Family Bible Front Cover: Wm R Crawford his book Bought from W. Carson the price $2.60 Births Wm. R. Crawford was bom AD May 25 day 1810 Olif V Crawford Bom AD January 23 day 1817 and their children was bom as follows Mary E. Crawford was bom AD December the 9 day 1832 Robert P. Crawford was bom AD November the 21,1835 Andrew J. Crawford was bom AD March the 17 day 1838 Wm. C. Crawford was bom AD April 26 day 1840 Martain W. Crawford was bom AD September the 5 day 1842 Philip J. Crawford was bom AD January 17 day 1845 Sina M. Crawford was bom AD July the 9 day 1847 Violet E. Crawford was bom AD February the 2 day 1850 Olif M. Crawford was bom AD January 10 day 1853 George W. Crawford was bom AD July the 18 day 1855 Varina C. Crawford was Bom AD May 18* 1862 Back of page: Births Wm Russel Crawford A J Crawford son was bom in year of our Lord february the 15 day 1860 131 Family Record Henry D. Welch and V. C. Welch's family Births H.D. Welch was bom June 17,1852 V.C. Welch was bom May 18, 1862 Thomas Clingman Welch was bom Dec. 29,1874* Nora May Welch was bom Oct. 18, 1879 John S. Welch was bom Sept. 6, 1881 Edward Theodor Welch was bom Aug. 23, 1883 Charles Haddon S. Welch was bom Jan. 16,1886 Cora Etta Welch was bom July 8, 1888 Jule Jester Welch was bom Mar. 5, 1890 Selma Florence Welch was bom Jan. 5, 1894 Henry Mclver Welch was bom Feb. 3,1899 Tessie Blanche Welch was bom May 7, 1902 Ky Charles Leonard Yandell Welch Bom Jan 19,1904** [JCB: *Thomas Clingman was obviously not a child of Varina Carletta Crawford Welch.] [**Charles Yandell was a grandson.] Marriages Wm R Crawford and Olif V Hemphill was married AD January 22 1832 Thomas M Henson and Mary E. Crawford was married AD December 23 1847 Robert P Crawford and Martha Sutton was married AD February 1857 A J Crawford and Minerva Sutton was married AD April 26 1859 Martin W Crawford and Elizabeth Snider was married AD April 30 1861 Sina M. Crawford Samuel Bryson was married AD April 6, 1865 Violet E. Crawford & Joseph Sutton was married AD February the 22 1866 Mariah O Crawford & John Bryson was married AD January 4th 1867 George W Crawford and Nancy Morrow was married in AD December 11 1873 P J Crawford & Adalad Clayton was married AD May 14 1866 Varina C Crawford and Henry D. Welch was married 20 day of Oct 1878 on Sunday at 1 o'clock by S. H. Bryson Ky K^> 132 .•WC-^S-fc- • Deaths Wm. C. Crawford departed this life March 24 AD day 1861 on the Sabbath A. J. Crawford departed this life July the 1st day 1862 in a Battle in Vir. at Malvern Hill Martin W. Crawford" departed this life March the 5 day 1863 in hospittle at goldsborough NC Robert P. Crawford departed this life March the 1st 1872 Because of consumption M.E. Henson departed this life May 1876 S.M. Bryson departed this life Jan. 19 1878 Rev. Wm. R. Crawford departed this life Nov. 27,1879 PJ. Crawford departed this life Oct. 6, 1888 Rev. G. W. Crawford departed this life April 5, 1889 Olif V. Crawford departed this life 21 day of Jan. 1900 Olif Mariah Crawford departed this life Dec 16th 1906 John S. Welch departed this life July 18 1957 Age 75 yrs, 10 mo and 12 days Edward Theodore Welch departed this life Aug 30,1961 Age 78 years, 7 days Nora M. Welch Tatham Died June 18,1973 Age 93 Tessie Blanche Welch Died April 3,1971 Jule Jester Welch departed this life Dec 23,1899 Age 8 years 9 mos & 18 days* Etta Cora Welch Carpenter departed this life Nov. 24,1909 Age 21 yrs 3 mo 16 da. Rev. Henry Dexter Welch departed this life Oct. 12 1927 Age 75 yrs 3 mo 25 days** Carletta Varena Welch departed this life Nov. 14 1943 Age 81 years 5 mo. 27 days Charles Haddon Welch departed this life Aug. 7 1953 Age 67 years 6 mo 21 days O [JCB * Written vertically beside Jester Welch's death date are the words "A blessed boy." This child was buried at Crawford Family Cemetery.] [Ed.** This is a curious notation. We believe that the Rev. Welch's middle name was Deck, after a maternal surname, rather than "Dexter." We wonder if that genealogical fact had been forgotten by this family, and they wanted to appear more formal and correct in the family Bible.] 133 The Monteith Family by Betty Cope Andrews [Ed: We continue in this issue with the descendants of Samuel H. Monteith and Mary Fisher.] V__y THOMAS (21) MONTEITH 1847 - 1934 THOMAS (21) MONTEITH, Samuel (20), Thomas (19), Samuel (18), Henry (17), John (16), James (15), James (14), James (13), James - (12), William (11), Alexander (10), James (9), William (8), William (7), William (6), William (5), William (4), John (3), Walter (2), John (1). THOMAS MONTEITH b. October 9, 1847 in Haywood County, North Carolina; d. January 26, 1934 in Jackson County, North Carolina. Thomas married Maranda Palestine "Pallie" Queen, October 26, 1875 at her father's home in Jackson County. Pallie was born July 15, 1855, daughter of James Smith Queen and Kiziah Avaline (Haynes) Queen. Pallie died December 27, 1942 in Jackson County, N C Thomas was a Confederate veteran of Company G, Thomas Legion, during the Civil War. Thomas 'and Pallie received a CSA pension. Thomas lived at Maples Springs was considered a master carpenter, a shoe cobbler, a hunter and fisherman. When he wasn't working, he would sit on their front porch and smoke his pipe. Pallie made quilts and made medicines and salves from herbs from her garden. Thomas was a charter member of the Methodist church of Sylva, Pallie attended Scott Creek Baptist Church. Thomas and Pallie are buried in Old Field Cemetery, Beta, Jackson County, NC. Twelve children all born in Jackson County. ^—' JAMES (22) FRANK MONTEITH born August 20, 1876; died February 20, 1885. Buried Old Field Cemetery. EMMA (22) BELLE MONTEITH- b o m January 29, 1878; died May 19, 1971. Emma married Manley Mr-Rickman August 25, 1899. Manley was born 1877, died 1948. Emma married James Lafayette Fisher. Emma married R. H. "Bud" Hyatt. Buried Old Field Cemetery. SARAH (22) ANN MONTEITH born March 14, 1880; died March 8, 1885. Buried Old Field Cemetery. MARY (22) AVALINE MONTEITH born April 5, 1882; died February 19, 1885. Buried Old Field Cemetery. SAMUEL (22) OSCAR MONTEITH born February 13, 1884; died February 21, 1885. Buried Old Field Cemetery. JOHN (22) BIRD MONTEITH born January 14, 1886; died April 25, 1976.