Southern Appalachian Digital Collections

Western Carolina University (2) View all
  • Journeys Through Jackson (4)
  • LGBTQ Archive of Jackson County (16)
  • Canton Champion Fibre Company (0)
  • Cherokee Traditions (0)
  • Civil War in Southern Appalachia (0)
  • Craft Revival (0)
  • Great Smoky Mountains - A Park for America (0)
  • Highlights from Western Carolina University (0)
  • Horace Kephart (0)
  • Oral Histories of Western North Carolina (0)
  • Picturing Appalachia (0)
  • Stories of Mountain Folk (0)
  • Travel Western North Carolina (0)
  • Western Carolina University Herbarium (0)
  • Western Carolina University: Making Memories (0)
  • Western Carolina University Publications (0)
  • Western Carolina University Restricted Electronic Theses and Dissertations (0)
  • Western North Carolina Regional Maps (0)
  • World War II in Southern Appalachia (0)
University of North Carolina Asheville (0) View all
  • Faces of Asheville (0)
  • Forestry in Western North Carolina (0)
  • Grove Park Inn Photograph Collection (0)
  • Morse Family Chimney Rock Park Collection (0)
  • Picturing Asheville and Western North Carolina (0)
  • Jackson County (N.C.) (20)
  • Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Asheville (N.C) (0)
  • Avery County (N.C.) (0)
  • Blount County (Tenn.) (0)
  • Buncombe County (N.C.) (0)
  • Cherokee County (N.C.) (0)
  • Clay County (N.C.) (0)
  • Graham County (N.C.) (0)
  • Great Smoky Mountains National Park (N.C. and Tenn.) (0)
  • Haywood County (N.C.) (0)
  • Henderson County (N.C.) (0)
  • Knox County (Tenn.) (0)
  • Knoxville (Tenn.) (0)
  • Lake Santeetlah (N.C.) (0)
  • Macon County (N.C.) (0)
  • Madison County (N.C.) (0)
  • McDowell County (N.C.) (0)
  • Mitchell County (N.C.) (0)
  • Polk County (N.C.) (0)
  • Qualla Boundary (0)
  • Rutherford County (N.C.) (0)
  • Swain County (N.C.) (0)
  • Transylvania County (N.C.) (0)
  • Watauga County (N.C.) (0)
  • Waynesville (N.C.) (0)
  • Yancey County (N.C.) (0)
  • Clippings (information Artifacts) (1)
  • Newsletters (4)
  • Photographs (3)
  • Sound Recordings (13)
  • Transcripts (15)
  • Video Recordings (physical Artifacts) (4)
  • Albums (books) (0)
  • Artifacts (object Genre) (0)
  • Cards (information Artifacts) (0)
  • Crafts (art Genres) (0)
  • Drawings (visual Works) (0)
  • Envelopes (0)
  • Financial Records (0)
  • Fliers (printed Matter) (0)
  • Glass Plate Negatives (0)
  • Internegatives (0)
  • Land Surveys (0)
  • Letters (correspondence) (0)
  • Manuscripts (documents) (0)
  • Maps (documents) (0)
  • Memorandums (0)
  • Minutes (administrative Records) (0)
  • Negatives (photographs) (0)
  • Occupation Currency (0)
  • Paintings (visual Works) (0)
  • Postcards (0)
  • Programs (documents) (0)
  • Publications (documents) (0)
  • Questionnaires (0)
  • Scrapbooks (0)
  • Sheet Music (0)
  • Slides (photographs) (0)
  • Specimens (0)
  • Speeches (documents) (0)
  • Text Messages (0)
  • Tintypes (photographs) (0)
  • WCU Gender and Sexuality Oral History Project (15)
  • A.L. Ensley Collection (0)
  • Appalachian Industrial School Records (0)
  • Appalachian National Park Association Records (0)
  • Axley-Meroney Collection (0)
  • Bayard Wootten Photograph Collection (0)
  • Bethel Rural Community Organization Collection (0)
  • Blumer Collection (0)
  • C.W. Slagle Collection (0)
  • Cataloochee History Project (0)
  • Cherokee Studies Collection (0)
  • Daisy Dame Photograph Album (0)
  • Daniel Boone VI Collection (0)
  • Doris Ulmann Photograph Collection (0)
  • Elizabeth H. Lasley Collection (0)
  • Elizabeth Woolworth Szold Fleharty Collection (0)
  • Frank Fry Collection (0)
  • George Masa Collection (0)
  • George Washington Carver and Slagle Family Collection (0)
  • Gideon Laney Collection (0)
  • Hazel Scarborough Collection (0)
  • Henry G. Hall Collection (0)
  • Hiram C. Wilburn Papers (0)
  • Historic Photographs Collection (0)
  • Horace Kephart Collection (0)
  • Humbard Collection (0)
  • Hunter and Weaver Families Collection (0)
  • I. D. Blumenthal Collection (0)
  • Isadora Williams Collection (0)
  • Jesse Bryson Stalcup Collection (0)
  • Jim Thompson Collection (0)
  • John B. Battle Collection (0)
  • John C. Campbell Folk School Records (0)
  • John Parris Collection (0)
  • Judaculla Rock project (0)
  • Kelly Bennett Collection (0)
  • Love Family Papers (0)
  • Major Wiley Parris Civil War Letters (0)
  • Map Collection (0)
  • Mountain Heritage Center Collection (0)
  • Norburn - Robertson - Thomson Families Collection (0)
  • Pauline Hood Collection (0)
  • Pre-Guild Collection (0)
  • Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual Collection (0)
  • R.A. Romanes Collection (0)
  • Rosser H. Taylor Collection (0)
  • Samuel Robert Owens Collection (0)
  • Sara Madison Collection (0)
  • Sherrill Studio Photo Collection (0)
  • Smoky Mountains Hiking Club Collection (0)
  • Southern Appalachian Archives (0)
  • Stories of Mountain Folk - Radio Programs (0)
  • The Reporter, Western Carolina University (0)
  • Venoy and Elizabeth Reed Collection (0)
  • WCU Mountain Heritage Center Oral Histories (0)
  • WCU Students Newspapers Collection (0)
  • Western North Carolina Tomorrow Black Oral History Project (0)
  • William Williams Stringfield Collection (0)
  • Zebulon Weaver Collection (0)
  • College student newspapers and periodicals -- North Carolina -- Cullowhee (1)
  • Gay community -- North Carolina, Western (3)
  • Gender nonconformity (3)
  • Oral history (11)
  • African Americans (0)
  • Agriculture -- North Carolina, Western (0)
  • Appalachian dance (0)
  • Appalachian music (0)
  • Appalachian Region, Southern -- Maps (0)
  • Appalachian Trail (0)
  • Architecture (0)
  • Artisans -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Arts and crafts movement -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Basket making -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Canning and preserving (0)
  • Cherokee art -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Cherokee artists -- North Carolina (0)
  • Cherokee language (0)
  • Cherokee pottery -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Cherokee women -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Church buildings (0)
  • Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.) (0)
  • Dance -- Appalachian Region (0)
  • Depressions -- 1929 -- Southern States (0)
  • Education -- North Carolina, Western (0)
  • Floods -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Forced removal, 1813-1903 (0)
  • Forest conservation (0)
  • Forests and forestry (0)
  • Great Smoky Mountains National Park (N.C. and Tenn.) (0)
  • Handicraft -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Historic buildings -- North Carolina (0)
  • Hunting (0)
  • Landscape photography (0)
  • Logging (0)
  • Lumber trade (0)
  • Mines and mineral resources (0)
  • North Carolina -- Maps (0)
  • Paper industry (0)
  • Postcards (0)
  • Pottery (0)
  • Railroad trains (0)
  • Rural electrification -- North Carolina, Western (0)
  • School integration -- Southern States (0)
  • Segregation -- Southern States (0)
  • Slavery (0)
  • Sports (0)
  • Storytelling (0)
  • Tennessee -- Maps (0)
  • Tennessee Valley Authority (0)
  • Tourism -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Waterfalls -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Weaving -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Wood-carving -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • World War, 1914-1918 (0)
  • World War, 1939-1945 (0)

Journeys Through Jackson 2020 Vol.30 No.03

  • record image
  • Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. The journal began as a monthly publication in July 1991, was published bimonthly from 1994 to 2003, and continues today as a quarterly publication. The journal issues in this digital collection are presented as annual compilations.
  • Journeys Through Jackson The Official Journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. Vol. XXX, No. Ill 2020 Vol. 3 JACKSON COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, INC, 2 0 2 0 O f f i c e r s President Vice Presidents Kenneth Nicholson Norma Bryson Clayton, Jean Hooper Scott Secretary. Treasurer Librarian ... Lynn Hotaling Michael Clayton .. George Frizzell IT. Editor. Office Manager Mary Buchanan Smith Kirk Stephens .... Sanji Talley Watson Journeys Through Jackson is the official publication of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. Members and non-members are invited to submit genealogical materials for publication, with the understanding that the editor reserves the right to edit these materials for genealogical content, clarity, or taste. The Society assumes no responsibility for errors of fact that may be contained in submissions, and except where noted, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor or of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. The Society accepts no advertising for this publication except for notices from other non-profit groups. 2020 has been a year of uncertainties. Everything has been stopped, postponed, cancelled and put off. With a global pandemic happening as we speak, we are all trying to "feel" our way through this. Our ancestors have faced adversity before us and we can weather this also. (We all come from strong stock!) Consider writing a remembrance of this time to leave with your research for your descendants. It would be something that your descendants would appreciate hearing about how we all came through this. We are needing updated surveys of the county's cemeteries, if you would like to help, please let the Editor know which one (or several) that you would be willing to do. We are attempting an update to the county cemetery book. As always, if there is pictures, stories, or information you would like to share, please feel free to drop it off at the Society or to contact the Editor. From the Editor Happy Me^ry av^d H-«p"py New y t a r l Mfly be better for every oiA/e! Journeys Through Jackson 2020 Vol. 3 Table of Contents Table of Contents 89 JCGS Photo Album 90-94 JCGS Awards Eight Scholarships 95-100 1880 Jackson County Census Records 101-104 Descendants of William Solomon Parker, Sr 105-108 1957 & 1958 Jackson County Death Certificates 109-112 Outline Descendant Report for Frederick (Baumgarten) Bumgarner 113-116 A Bear Hunt in Jackson County, NC 117-119 A Word From President Kenneth Nicholson 120 Fontana Removal Cards 121-124 Reminder 125 This and That 126 Index 127-128 Our office is open on an appointment basis. Feel free to come in and work on your research. AW safety protocol is being followed. Now is a good time to drag out your rzseardrx and work on it. If we can help in any way, please feel free to call and come in. Please remember that dues for the calendar year 2021 are due at the first of the year. Individual dues are $25, family dues are $30. We also have life-time memberships available. Please see the inside back cover for more information. If you would, please consider updating your Information for our membership list. We would appreciate updated addresses, phone numbers, email addresses and family of interest. Journeys Through Jackson 2020 Vol. 3 JCGS Photo Album Here are some more pictures that were shared with the Society by Larry Crawford. The lady in the picture to the left has been identified as Mattie Blanton. Who is she? The picture below was developed at Donahoe Studio in Sylva, but the gentlemen in the picture are unknown. Does anyone know who these men are? 90 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 Vol. 3 JCGS Photo Album These three pictures are also of unidentified people. If you know who they may be, please let us know. 91 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 Vol. 3 JCGS Photo Album The picture above left is a post card picture, on the back is inscribed: Mr. Richard Hoyle, and Mr. Grady Blanton. In the address portion of the picture is the name Mrs. J. E. Norman. Larry Crawford wrote note: "From the west. Little boy is one of John's, adult is his first cousin." The ladies in the picture on the right are identified on the back by only their first names, "Margaret, Evelyn and Cleatus." If anyone knows who this is, please let us know. Looks like they have been picking berries of some kind. 92 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL 3 JCGS Photo Album The picture above identifies this couple as Thad Ensley and Nancy Thalitha (Nannie) Fisher Ensley. The picture to the left is identified by Larry Crawford as: "Baxter and Fanny with: back row; Wayne, Wade. Baxter and Fannie in the next row; then in front, Paul, Annie, Carrie Jay. 93 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 Vol. 3 JCGS Photo Album Here are a few pictures that we had received recently. The picture above is of the James Marion Shook and Jamima Elizabeth Middleton Shook family. Back row: Mary Elizabeth (Davis), Bertha Mae (Fisher), Martha Ann (Orr), Nancy Jane (Chastain), Jamima Elizabeth (Tucker), Ida Lee (Owen). Middle Row: James Clyde, Willard, Vernon Vess, George Alfred. Front row: Daniel Fate, Elizabeth Jamima Middleton Shook, James Marion Shook. The picture to the left is of the Shook boys. Back row: Willard (29 Mar 1916-16 Jan 1996); Vernon Vess (23 Mar 1907-1 Nov 1979); Daniel Fate (21 Feb 1925- 11 Mar 2004). Front row: James Clyde (16 Oct 1932 - 2020); George Alfred (27 Oct 1929-4 Jul 2013). 94 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL 3 JCGS Awards Eight Scholarships Jackson County Genalogical Society is pleased to announce that they have awarded eight scholarships to well deserving students in Jackson County. Each student must fill out an application and write a short essay on genealogy, history of Jackson County, or about a person, place or thing in Jackson County. SYLVA ROTARY CLUB SCHOLARSHIP; Evelyn Pavey is a graduate of Smoky Mountain High School, she participated in the Show Choir, musical theatre. The World Language Competition, also the Fishing Club and a member of the Nationals Honors Society. She has helped prepare and serve meals at Haywood Pathways Center in Haywood County, and has worked as a stage manager at Folkmoot USA. She has worked as the stage manager and led the production design for the past three musicals at the school. She is also the alto leader in the Show Choir. She plans on attending Western Carolina University's School of Stage and Screen to study Entertainment Design and Technology with a minor in Spanish. The Importance of Genealogy Imagine the brisk, cool breeze blowing through your hair and writhing your clothes on a tepid Appalachian evening. The calm wind blows the smell of sweetgrass and willow into your nose. Look up and see the stars above you, depicting constellations that tell storied of the past. Notice the lush green earth beneath your feet. You are in western North Carolina, and these are the same sensations that my ancestors have been influenced by for hundreds of years. The very culture of western North Carolina has roots that run deeper than the rushing rivers of the Appalachian Mountains through not only nature, but the people themselves. This land was settled thousands of years ago by the Cherokee people and were later joined by immigrants hailing from places such as England, Ireland, and even slaves forced to work here by the trans-Atlantic slave trade. All of these populations have combined to create a unique culture and society in western North Carolina. On an extremely broad spectrum, many people know about where they came from, but could they dig deeper? Those who wish to seek a deeper meaning of self often search through temporary and unfiilfilling vices, but it is often overlooked to simply look behind you. No matter what area of the world you came from, there are people before you that have survived on this Earth and have essentially been the only reason for your existence, and they all make up a small portion of who you are. This is especially prevalent of those with family histories through western North Carolina. Many people here have ancestries through several cultures that they may not even know about, and researching that can lead down a ftilfilling path, as it will reveal to you who you truly are. This can help to unify people of all cultures throughout the world. Simply learning that your name comes from someone in your family history will cause you to feel as though someone is watching over you. Genealogical research is a fantastic way to learn more about your family and where you come from and can lead to a more united community. After I have completed my own genealogical research, I view everything differently knowing that I gaze upon the same stars as my ancestors once did. Almost everything about us as people comes from those before us, and if they can make it through the world, then without a doubt, so can we. ROBERT GLENN AND HAZEL NORMAN CRAWFORD SCHOLARSHIP: Kaitlyn Stewart is a graduate of Blue Ridge Early College. She has participated in Varsity sports (Volleyball, Softball, Basketball and Soccer): Interact Club; Student Body Government Association as President; Math Club; and Prom Committee. She has worked as a Junior member of the Glenville-Cashiers Rescue Squad and also referee for youth sports in Jackson County. She plans on attending Southern Wesleyan University with a major in Biology, with a possible minor in Chemistry, with the plans of attending Medical School and becoming a Doctor. The Importance of Genealogy Genealogical Research is important because it lets us know where we came from and who we are. The research allows us to gain insight on our family background and lets us discover what our ancestors had to go through to bring us where we are today. You learn how your existence and who you are is shaped by not only your actions, but also the actions done by the ones who came long before you. Doing research on the history of your family can help you Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL 3 not only leam more about relatives that you have lost touch with, but also people that you may not have known you were related to. Not to mention that as you continue to research and grow your knowledge on where you came from (regardless of the difficulty with records, names, family connections, etc.) you also continue to gain knowledge on the people that you care about and are related to. It is really an amazing opportunity to leam more about your ancestral roots. While some chose to go into genealogy because of things they do not know, some go into it to leam more about the things they already know. Genealogical not only has the side that everyone sees in the commercials; where they research and fmd out they're related to a celebrity or famous person. The research also has very practical uses that can be helpful and possibly benefit the people in your family. For example, you can get to the bottom of all your family heritage stories and find out if they are tme or not. Research can also help people find out how their ancestors might have contributed to a specific historical event and possible cause a spark of interest in the topic too. One use that I think is really cool is tracking medical conditions through genealogy research. Imagine having a genetic medical condition and you have no idea where it came from, naturally, you're going to want some answers sooner or later. This type of historical research allows people to track down some much more than just names and birth dates, it's a way of discovering so many new aspects that you may have never even known about, it's a way of finding yourself WILLIAM LORANZO CRAWFORD SCHOLARSHIP Autumn Cunningham has graduated from Smoky Mountain High School where she participated in Soccer; Spring Track; the Spring Musical; Student Health Advisory Council; Women's Bible Study. She has volunteered helping Costa Rica elementary students; working at Catman2 shelter; Operation Christmas Child boxes; Blood drives and blanket drive. She plans on attending Southwestem Community College, with the plans of obtaining a degree in Outdoor Leadership, with plans of becoming a Recreation Manager/Director or Park Ranger. Susie Cook McMahan Great-Great Grandmother to Autumn K. Cunningham This is a story about my great-great grandmother Susie Cook McMahan a well-known midwife in Jackson County, North Carolina. Susie was the daughter of William Floyd Cook and Alice Parker Cook. Susie Cook was bom July 1, 1901 and married Lawrence McMahan and at the age of 24 Susie began her midwife career. Susie had 11 children of her own who were raised on Caney Fork in Cullowhee, North Carolina. In her own words this is how she got her start, "I happened up to a place one day where a woman was having a baby. The father said, 'Susie you know what to do' and 1 fixed it." A midwife had been called but didn't arrive until after the birth. There was a real need for midwives back in Susie's youth. There were few doctors to cover the rural mountainous areas. Susie had to walk miles back into the mountains sometimes to deliver a baby. She often spent two or three days with the mother before she left her and seldom received any material reward for her work but she couldn't refuse to help. She would sometimes be given a few chickens or home canned foods. Many times, when she delivered a child the family wouldn't have a stich of any clothing for the baby but she came prepared with her big white bag in which she always found just what she needed. When Susie realized she had a gift to save mothers and babies, she began to take training at the courthouse in Sylva under Mrs. Roberta Sauter, county health nurse. Susie leamed how to disinfect soap and materials needed during deliveries and became what she called, "B" nurse. She also filed birth certificates for each child she delivered at the Jackson County courthouse. Susie told many stories of her trips to deliver babies during severe weather and the 1940 flood, but weather never stopped her from helping those in need. Susie helped out area doctors like Doc Wilkes, Big Doc Nichols, and Little Dock Nichols. She said often Doc Wilkes would stay till she could get there, then leave mother and baby in her capable hands. Susie recalls the good doctor telling his patients, "I know Mrs. McMahan can do as good as I can", and then he would leave. When trails arose Susie would use her instincts to save lives. Susie never lost a child or mother except for a couple of babies that died before she could get to them. As a midwife, probably some of Susie's most proud births were her own grandchildren, many of which she helped bring into the world. When arthritis set in, Susie retired in 1966 when she said women could more easily get to doctors and hospitals. After 2,000 successfijl deliveries, Susie earned her retirement and the respect of a lot of families in Jackson County. Susie passed away Febmary 1, 1990, the last member of the William Floyd Cook family. Several articles were published about Susie McMahan's career as a midwife, one of those articles was published by Angela GrifRn, a writer for the Sylva Herald and Ruralite in the Thursday, July 28,1988 edition. Upon her passing John Parris wrote an article about Susie entitled "Last of the Old-Time "Granny Women'". Daniel Johnson published a book in 2001 about the William Floyd Cook family entitled, "Keep the Banner Wavin'". This story was 96 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL 3 about my great-great grandmother Susie Cook McMahan whose son is L. C. McMahan my great grandfather. His daughter Pat McMahan Sluder (my grandmother) and her son Michael Derrick Cunningham, who is my father. ROBERT LARRY CRAWFORD SCHOLARSHIP Mallorie Mahoney is a graduate of Smoky Mountain High School, who plans to attend Southwestern Community College, to pursue a degree in Radiography. After graduating from SCC, the plans are to attend Radiation Therapy School. Overall career plan is to become a Radiation Therapist. She has participated in: HOSA; Women's Bible Study; SHAC, Student Health Advisory Council; National Honor Society. She has volunteered in several activities including: CatMan2 Shelter; Blood Drives with HOSA; Tutoring elementary students; Operation Christmas Child and many more. The Second Oldest Home in Jackson County Behind every family, there is some type of story to tell. Mine happens to be on a place of local heritage. In my family is a historical structure that has housed eight generations. It is also the second oldest standing home in Jackson County. The house is located on Fisher Creek in Sylva, North Carolina The poplar log cabin was built one hundred fifty-five years ago. Over the years, this house has held a significant amount of importance to my family. The log cabin was completed being built in 1869 by Western Farmer. He started building right after the Civil War ended in 1865. Weston Farmer was the great grandfather of my great grandfather, Dennis Ensley. Jane Farmer Ensley, Dennis Ensley's grandmother lived in the log cabin after Weston Farmer. After Jane and her husband, Joseph moved out to a nearby house, the cabin was used as a boarding house. In 1925, Dennis Ensley's parents, Dewey and Fannie (Anthony) Ensley moved into the cabin. There was no indoor plumbing featured in the house until 1960s. Dewey and Fannie Ensley celebrated their 50"' anniversary in the house and almost celebrated their 60"* before Dewey passed away in 1985. After he died, Fannie continued living there for many years before she passed away. Fannie was known for always having fined apple pies waiting for any guests. My great grandfather, Dennis Ensley, was bom in the house and ended up living there until 1951when he joined the military. He later married Lois Hooper and had three children. His children spent their summers at the house while their grandparents lived there. From 2003-2007, my father, Chris Mahoney and my mother, Katie Mahoney lived there with my sister and I. We were the seventh generation to live in the historical structure. After the cabin we moved into a house on the same road. The cabin underwent some big renovations after we moved out. After my family, the eighth generation lived in the house. My uncle Randy Ensley, who was Dennis and Lois (Hooper) Ensley's son, lived in the cabin with his wife. They lived there for about 3 years until moving into another family house below the cabin. The cabin is now used for any family members to stay when visiting Jackson County. The log cabin is an important place of local heritage to my family. It all started with Weston Farmer building this home for his family and it now turned into the second oldest standing house in Jackson County. Weston Farmer probably had no idea the cabin was going to house so many generations when he completed the cabin in 1869. There is a lot of historical significance the log cabin holds. Eight generations and many guests were able to experience this over the past one hundred and fifty-five years. SCOTT FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP Dallas Dean was awarded the Scott Foundation Scholarship. She was a graduate of Blue Ridge Early College. She has volunteered to teach others to play soccer, and several different instruments. She has also competed in 5K races. She works part-time at Ingles. She plans to attend Western Carolina University, pursuing a major in Chemistry. She would like to work for NASA or SpaceX after graduation. The Importance of Genealogy Genealogy can be thought of as the study of families, family history, lineages and ancestry. Often times when researching genealogy, people are able to not only figure out information about their family as a whole, but they are also able to discover new information about themselves. Many people do not realize the extent of information that they have access to, just by researching their genealogy. When researching genealogy, most websites will be able to display a family tree, an ethnicity report, and much more. By taking a look at the family tree, people are able to see who their relatives and ancestors are. Aside from the Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL J natural curiosity, there are many reasons that someone may wish to know who they are related to. For example, a child that has been adopted may wish to know who their biological parents and other relatives are; someone who has no remaining family members that are currently living may wish to know their relatives were. By knowing your biological bloodline, you are able to better understand your genetic makeup and therefore see if you are at higher risk for illnesses, likely to pass away at a young or old age, and much more information that can help you live your best life, while also being smart about your choices. Family trees also have the power to show whether or not you are related to someone famous, your family's life long stories are true, and where you get those big blue eyes from. Another benefit of researching your genealogy is getting your ethnicity report. Just like when looking into your family tree and seeing what medical risks you have, you can do the same with your ethnicity. Some ethnic groups are more at risk than others for certain illnesses and this information could become very dire during your life time. Knowing your ethnicity can also give you a sense of pride in who you are. It can also help you to become more in tune with your cultural background and relate to others that share that background. When researching my own genealogy, I found that I was related to the famous county singer Johnny Cash. Also while researching, I found that in my ethnicity report, it is estimated that I am seventy-three percent English, Welsh, and Northwestern European; twenty-six percent Irish and Scottish; and only one percent European Jewish. With this newfound information about myself, I would be able to then research how likely that combination of ethnicities is for obtaining different types of cancer, illnesses, and other risks. This information would help me to know what activities in my daily life could potentially have dangerous effects on me later in my future. Also, by knowing that I am related to Johnny Cash, I could test out my own skills of singing, although they probably are no where near as good as his. Genealogy is a good way for people to discover information that they may have never even thought about before. Genealogy can help those that have no other way of finding out about their family's history or true ethnicity. Genealogy helps people around the world by showing and giving them a place to fit in. Without genealogy, there would be so many people that would have no idea who their biological family was and they would have no idea about their medical risks, where their looks came from, or if they were related to a famous person. Ultimately, without genealogy we would not have anywhere near the amount of information that we do today. CLAYTON FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP In Honor of Mike Clayton's grandfather, Thomas Lee Clayton Sydney Rice graduated from Smoky Mountain High School. She participated in FCA, National Honors Society, Appalachian Oral History Project and was a High School Sports Announcer. She has participated in FCA leadership, youth group at The Bridge Church and the children's ministry. She is planning on attending Clemson University, working for a degree in Business and marketing. She would like to work in the field of Physical Therapy. My name is Sydney Rice and I am a senior at Smoky Mountain High School. I am honored to be able to apply for a scholarship through The Jackson County Genealogical Society. I believe genealogical research is more important to people than they may realize. Genealogical research helps people feel connected. I have found this to be the case through my work with the Appalachian Oral History Project. Through this project I was able to interview local individuals to find out about our heritage in this region. This helped me realize how important heritage, culture, and traditions are. I thought this importance may be more specific in western North Carolina; however, in thinking about how many people are taking DNA tests as well as the popularity of Ancestry.com, it is evident that people everywhere are searching for ways to be connected with others. I have been fortunate in that a lot of my family members live in the area and have already completed research regarding my family tree. I can ask my great-grandmother, parents, a number of aunts, or extended family members when I have questions. Until I began working on the Appalachian Oral History Project, I never really stopped to think how fortunate I am to have these resources at my disposal. Several other members working on the project live in the area without close family around, as well as without knowing a lot about their families beyond their immediate or close family members. During my interviews for the Appalachian Oral History Project I realized some of the traditions I have are not specific to my particular family but also to others in this region; however, for students who were from different areas they had completely different traditions. In being able to discuss our shared traditions there were a special connection and understanding between us that others did not have. It has been wonderful to run into some of the people we interviewed and be able to talk about something we eat, practice, or do that helps us build stronger ties. It is not that other students were not able to make connections with these people but there was something different and special from sharing a similar heritage. Genealogical research serves many different purposes, 1 believe on of the strongest and most compelling reasons people research their families and where they come from is to fell connected, at a deep level, to a group of people. 98 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL 3 Most individuals want to belong and have ties to other people, genealogical research helps provide these connections and I am happy to see and increase in its popularity. LENOIR NICHOLSON STACK SCHOLARSHIP (1) Breanna R. Ashe was awarded the first of two Lenoir Nicholson Stack Scholarships this year. She graduated from Smoky Mountain High School. She participated in HOSA, National Honors Society, Mission of Hope Mission Team, Wolf Creek Baptist Church Vacation Bible School. She has participated in Mission trips to West Virginia, donating Pediatric Wagons with IV poles to various hospitals, helped with SMHS blood drive. She plans to work as a CNA or Pharmacy Technician while going to WCU and majoring in Pre-Veterinary Medicine. She plans to certify in Equestrian Therapy. Once she finishes at WCU, she plans to attend an accredited school of Veterinary Medicine. She eventually plans to return to Jackson County and open a mobile veterinary service. I am a native of Cullowhee, North Carolina. I am a fourth generation Jackson County native on both sides of my family. Both my parents were raised in Jackson County and graduated from Smoky Mountain High School. My mother was raised in Whittier and my father was raised in Tuckasegee. My sister and I were both raised in Cullowhee. My paternal grandfather and grandmother were raised in Tuckasegee. My maternal grandmother was raised in Whittier and my maternal grandfather was raised in Balsam. My maternal great grandfather, Thad Styles, was bom in Whittier. When he grew older he married my maternal great grandmother, Bonnie Gunter, who was also bom in Whittier. They lived in Whittier their entire lives where they had four children. My great grandfather, Thad Styles, sold cattle all over westem North Carolina. He always attended the livestock sale, which was on Thursday aftemoons. He was known as the cattleman of Jackson County. My maternal great grandmother, Bonnie Gunter Styles, was a maid, she also worked in a sewing factory as a seamstress and was a store manager in a retail store - the old Family Dollar. My other matemal grandparents were Doris McCall and Willard Beck who both grew up in Balsam. They raised their six children in Balsam as well. My matemal grandmother, Doris McCall Beck, worked in a sewing factory as a seamstress, then made biscuits at McDonalds, and she also worked with her husband, Willard, in their own landscaping business. My matemal grandfather, Willard Beck worked as a furniture store, then worked at Westem Carolina University and leamed his trade as a landscapes then later opened his own landscaping business with his wife, Doris Beck. My paternal great grandparents were Neal Prince and Maude Brown. My Granny Maude was bom in the Little Canada community of Tuckasegee and my Papaw Neal was bom in Caney Fork section of Cullowhee. They raised their six daughters in the Little Canada community of Tuckasegee. My great grandfather Neal Prince was a Gunner's Mate II in the United States Navy. He was stationed in Norfolk, Virginia during WWII. After he was honorably discharged from the Navy, he returned back home to Jackson County and worked as a timber cutter. He did this until the lakes were built in Little Canada. He started working with the construction crews helping to build the lakes; he also was a time keeper for the workers. Later he worked for Nantahala Power and Light Company, where he eventually retired. My great grandmother Maude Brown Prince was a stay at home mother. She was a homemaker and she was constantly busy gardening, canning, and preserving her harvest. She also sewed clothes for all her children, made quilts, kept a flower garden, and took care of the livestock. My patemal great grandparents, Neal and Maude Prince, attended Wolf Creek Baptist Church, which is where my patemal grandparents, aunts, cousins, and family fnends attend. My parents, sister and I attend Wolf Creek Baptist Church as well. My other patemal great grandparents were Asbury Ashe and Hazel Shook. They were both bom and raised in Tuckasegee; there they raised four sons. My Papaw Berry (Asbury Ashe) made a living as a heavy equipment operator. My Granny Hazel worked at High Hampton in Cashiers as a housekeeper, she also worked as a caregiver, but overall, she was a homemaker. I enjoyed leaming about my family heritage and speaking to my grandparents about their parents. It is important to me to hear their storied and the ways they grew up to capture the rich heritage that I am a part of today. Both sets of my matemal great grandparents attended church regularly as well. I am blessed to have wonderful Christian heritage that inspires me every day. LENIOR NICHOLSON STACK SCHOLARSHIP (2) Keanu Jonas "KJ" Amnions was awarded the second scholarship from the Lenior Nicholson Stack Scholarship Fund. He attended Jackson County Early College. He has participated in the Rotary Club of Jackson County, National Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL 3 Honor Society, National Technical Honors Society, and the American Legion Speech Competition. He has volunteered as an Intern at WCU in undergraduate research. He is President of PESK Trail community service and Boy's Nation 2019 platform committee chairman. He plans to attend Western Carolina University and pursue a degree in Electrical Power and Construction. He has the plans after graduation to attend an Ivy League school and obtain a PHD in Nuclear Engineering. A Hero of the Century During the IS"" national Census of the United States in the 1930's, my great-grandfather Benjamin A. Dillard would have appeared as nothing more than a name and number. As millions of Americans were documented and counted on dense sheets of paper, it's easy to imagine that such a name would be forgotten. The same, however, cannot be said for my family and I. The Dillard name is that of patriotism and heroic dedication to the American people. In wanting to discover more about a man to whom I held the highest degree of respect, I found the honor and privilege of speaking with him mere weeks before his passing. His story is one that embodies the essence of Appalachian and Christian values - as American as baseball and root-beer floats. In presenting his military and domestic experience, I seek to celebrate and describe the life of a man who is as honorable and respectable as they come: Benjamin Dillard. In the midst of the Great Depression, families endured the full-frontal turmoil of absolute economic collapse. Food was entirely dependent one what could be grown or harvested directly from farmlands and domesticated animals. Benjamin Dillard was the second eldest son of three brothers and sisters, making food evermore scarce. Being the eldest of two brothers, Dillard took a great deal of leadership and responsibility upon himself to meet the demands of a growing family. Despite being merely five years of age in the 1930's, he routinely found himself plowing fields on horseback - preparing the ground for crop rotation - and taking care of his two younger siblings. Maintaining family assets on the farm was a full-time occupation unto itself. Com and sweet potatoes were the two most readily available and routine commodities of the 1930's, especially to the rural southern farmlands; nevertheless, the Great Depression proved to be a dauting challenge in producing income. Ralph Dillard, Benjamin Dillard's father, worked in a tanning factory whilst the mother cultivated the property to its maximum capacity. Massive influxes of poverty and unemployment forces local businesses to cut wages, modify prices, and resort to traditional bartering for goods and services. Sweet potatoes proved its worth as a valuable trading item in a time were the traditional occupations were shrouded with uncertainty. Hardship, although incredibly common, is not the best representation of 1930s Appalachia. In the spirit of ambition, earning a prestigious reputation in sports was a southern man's key to eternal success; baseball, boxing, and football were all popular. At an early age, Benjamin Dillard displayed fantastic talent in a classic American pastime: Baseball. During an afterschool session in the summer of 1938, a group of young men came together and established the Sylva Plow Boys, a strapping group of baseball players set on representing the town of Sylva in school tournaments and regional competitions. My grandfather was an immediate consideration for his skill and dexterity in both offensive and defensive roles. Such was the early life of a simpler, quitter culture. Staying close to home, working at a local general store, and enjoying routine baseball practice encompassed the majority of his teenage life - until he turned 18. In the wake of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the United States officially declared war on the Axis powers. Dillard was merely 16 years old at the time. Whereas the Great Depression offered a great deal of uncertainty, worldwide conflict forced evermore vacillation upon a generation bom in the midst of economic tribulation. Dillard continued his waning teenage years with a mixture of simplicity and impunity. The household radio and local newspaper provided news reports of drafted, military engagements, and national service efforts. Time progressed, and the worldwide conflict between the Allied and Axis powers intensified beyond initial speculation. Meer months after turning 18, a federal letter called upon Benjamin Dillard's name to serve the United States Army. Nearly a century ago, a 1930's national census would have counted my great-grandfather as yet another face in the crowd, but little did many know, a small-town Appalachia man would lead a life that was extraordinary. While the recent passing of my grandfather invokes a sense of melancholy upon the entire family, his lifelong legacy of heroism and strength will perpetuate his name throughout history. The strength of his character, coupled with the truth of his legacy stands as a prime representation of classic Appalachian culture, for this reason, we celebrate. 100 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL 3 1880 Jackson County Census Records ED: We continue in this issue with the Canada Township. Abstracted in 2020 by Sanji Talley Watson. The records were abstracted as written. Enumerator had problems with reporting the number of the houses and families. Some entries were unreadable. To read; dwelling number; house number; name; age; race; relation to head of household; job; person bom; father bom; mother bom. Family 13 and home 13 was omitted in the Hamburg census. 61-64 Brown, William 45 W ~ Farmer NC NC NC Mary 28 W - Wife - Keeping house " Sarah 21 W - Daughter - Ast. Keeping house Jefferson 17 W - Son - Work on farm (t i4 it Martha 15 W - Daughter - Ast. Keeping house (( (4 44 William 14 W - Son - Work on farm 44 44 44 Harmon 12 W - Son - Work on farm 44 44 44 Samuel 10 W-Son 44 44 44 Richard 7 W-Son 44 Esther V, 5 W -Daughter 44 44 44 Ruben H. 1 W-Son 44 44 44 62-65 Melton, Gilbert 55 W - Farmer NC NC NC Martha A. 54 W - Wife - Keeping house 44 44 44 Vianna 22 W -Daughter - Ast. Keeping house GA NC NC AntaM. 21 W - Daughter - Ast. Keeping house 44 44 44 Silvester 19 W - Son - Works on farm 44 44 44 Margartte 16 W - Daughter - Ast. House keeping 44 44 44 Samuel 14 W - Son - Works on farm 44 44 44 Marinda 9 W - Daughter NC NC NC Thomas, Olive 77 W - Mother in Law NC NC No num. Alexander, John 59 W - Farmer NC NC NC Catharine 47 W - Wife - Keeping house 44 44 44 Benjamin 21 W - Son - Works on farm 44 44 44 Sarah A. 16 W - Daughter - Ast. Keeping house 44 44 44 John H. 14 W - Son - Works on farm 44 44 44 William 10 W-Son 44 44 44 Isaac F. 5 W-Son 44 44 44 Rutledge 2 W-Son 44 44 44 No num. Queen, Benjamin 49 W - Preacher NC NC SC Mary C. 49 W - Wife - Keeping house NC NC NC William 22 W - Son - Works on farm 44 44 44 Gusta??? 14 W - Son - Works on farm 44 44 44 Harmon 10 W-Son 44 44 44 Victoria 7 W - Daughter 44 44 44 No num. Alexander, Sam 23 W - Farmer NC NC NC Rachel 25 W - Wife - Keeping house 44 44 44 Roberson 3 W-Son 44 44 44 George W. 1 W ~ Son 44 44 44 No num. Masingal, Robert 50 W - Farmer SC SC SC Lillie 35 W - Wife - Keeping house SC NC SC Louiza J. 13 W - Daughter - Ast. Keeping house NC SC SC Candis 11 W - Daughter - Ast. Keeping house 44 44 44 John M. 9 W-Son 44 44 44 Debbie L. 7 W - Daughter 44 44 44 N9797979W9799 6 W-Son 44 44 44 Andrew 4 W-Son 44 44 44 101 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL 3 Allay E. 3 W - Daughter (( (t (( No num. Huffman, Th?? 22 W-ng NC NC NC Martha 19 W - Wife - Keeping house (4 Sarah 1 W - Daughter (( (i a That completes the Canada Township. The next one will be Hamburg Township. 1-1 Wilson, Alfred H. 40 W -Farmer NC NC NC Laura 27 W - Wife - House keeping ( ( i i ( ( Elanda 4 W - Son - at home ( « u Julie 2 W - Daughter - At home (4 44 44 Bessie 11/12 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Lizzie 18 W - Boarder 44 44 44 2-2 Wilson, Wm. A. 31 W - Fanner NC NC NC Hiley S. 31 W - Wife - House keeping 44 44 44 Mary E. 9 W - Daughter - At home 44 44 44 John A. 7 W - Son - At home 44 44 44 Avin L. 5 W - Son - At home 44 44 44 Lillie H. 2 W - Daughter - At home (4 44 44 Not named 1/12 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Hoxed, Walter H. 13 W - Boarder - Farm Laborer 44 44 44 3-3 Wilson, Alfred 67 W - Farmer NC NC NC Rebecca 55 W - Wife - House keeping 44 44 44 Arminda E. 23 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Rebecca A. 17 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Shook, Mary A. 83 W - Mother in Law 44 44 44 4-4 Bearl, Mary A. 40 W - House keeping NC NC NC Georgean 15 W - Daughter GA GA NC Marget J. 12 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Sarah L. 7 W - Daughter NC GA NC 5-5 Cain, Foster 55 W - Farmer SC SC SC Sarah M. 61 W - Wife - Keeping house NC NC NC Andrew C. 17 W - Son - Farm Laborer NC SC NC Shook, Matilda N. 20 W - Daughter 44 44 44 6-6 Bams, Ninnivy 66 W - Farmer NC NC NC Mary A. 45 W - Wife - Keeping house 44 44 44 Dovey A. 10 W - Daughter - at home 44 44 44 Nelyan 9 W - Daughter - at home 44 44 44 David A. 7 W - Son - at home 44 44 44 Marge L. 5 W - Daughter - at home 44 44 44 Avaline R. 23 W - Daughter - Assist in keeping house 44 44 44 John M. 5/12 W - Daughter (Maybe grandson) 44 44 44 Woodring, Salena 21 W - Boarder 44 44 44 John 1 W - Son (Salena's son?) 44 44 44 7-7 Wilson, James C. 28 W - Farmer NC NC NC Margart R. 22 W - Wife - House keeping 44 44 44 Donnie 0. 1 W-Son 44 44 44 Lonnie R. 3/12 W-Son 44 44 44 Hooper, Nelson 19 W - Boarder - Farm Laborer 44 44 44 Hooper, Lee V. 17 W - Boarder - Farm Laborer 44 44 44 8-8 Wilson, Thomas 45 W - Farmer NC NC SC Gemima 46 W - Wife - House keeping NC SC SC Margart A. 22 W - Daughter NC NC NC John H. 20 W - Son - Farm Laborer 44 44 44 102 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL 3 Lizzie C. 19 W - Daughter - at home (4 (4 «« Sallie R. 16 W - Daughter - at home «« (( (( Thomas B. 16 W - Son - Farm Laborer (( (4 44 IvaH. 12 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Lemuel A. 10 W - Son - at home 44 44 44 James R. 5 W - Son -at home 44 44 44 9-9 Sittin, John 40 W - Farmer SC SC sc Margaret J. 29 W - Wife - House keeping NC NC NC Laura L 15 W - Daughter NC sc NC Julius H. 10 W - Son - Farm Laborer 44 44 44 Clercy J. 9 W - Daughter - at home 44 44 44 Wm. E. 7 W - Son - at home " Ulysses N. 5 W-Son " Gemima J. 3 W - Daughter » U Not named 7/12 W ~ Son U » 10-10 Fulbright, John T. 31 W - Farmer NC NC NC Liza M. 30 W - Wife - House keeping NC SC SC Miles B. 10 W - Son - Farm hand NC NC NC Corie B. 8 W - Daughter - at home 44 44 44 Victoria A. 6 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Iver T. 2 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Slaten, Nancy 78 W~ SC SC SC 11-11 Hooper, Wm. H. 49 W - Farmer NC NC NC Sarah ? 36 W - Wife - House keeping 44 44 44 Lauran L. 5 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Alma 3 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Corry R. 1 W ~ Son 44 44 44 12-12 Gazaway, James 40 W - Farmer SC SC NC Sarah L. 35 W - Wife - House keeping SC SC NC John H. 14 W - Farm hand NC SC SC Jehu M. 10 W - Son - Farm hand 44 44 44 Sarah 5 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Alonzo 2 W - Son 44 44 44 14-14 Hoxed, John A. 58 W - Farmer NC NC NC Marty A. 46 W - Wife - House keeping SC SC SC George W. 10 W - Son - Farm hand NC SC SC Jane S. 8 W - Daughter - at home 44 44 44 Simon ? 6 W - Son - at home 44 44 44 John 5 W - Daughter (? Should be son) at home 44 44 44 15-15 Bams, Joseph T. 24 W - Farmer GA NC NC Susan A. 22 W -Wife - House keeping NC NC NC Feraby J. 4 W - Daughter - at home GA NC NC Elbert L. 2 W-Son NC NC NC 16-16 Hooper (?), Franklin 24 W - Farmer NC NC NC Julia N. 23 W - Wife - House keeping 44 44 44 Bertha 4 W~ 44 44 44 Lurance A. 6/12 W~ 44 44 44 Beard, Mark 18 W - Farm laborer 44 44 44 17-17 Wilson, Th??? 65 W -Farmer NC NC NC Mary 60 W - Wife - House keeping 44 44 44 Jemima I. 25 W - Daughter 44 44 44 T???? T. 21 W - Son - Farm Laborer 44 44 44 Moss, John M. 16 W - Grandson - Farm Laborer 44 44 44 103 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL 3 18-18 WiEsins, John A. 37 W - Farmer NC SC NC Arminda 34 W - Wife - House keeping NC NC NC William A. 14 W - Son - Farm Laborer (( (4 (4 Sareniah J. 12 W - Daughter - at home 44 44 44 Annie B. 10 W - Daughter - at home 44 44 44 John R. 8 W - Son - at home 44 44 44 Mary M. 6 W - Daughter - at home 44 44 44 Robert R. 4 W-Son 44 44 44 Arminda E. 8/12 W - Daughter 44 44 44 19-19 Wilson, Thomas H. 28 W - Farmer NC NC NC Neoma L. 26 W - Wife - Keeping house 44 44 44 Alfred L. 7 W - Son - at home 44 44 44 Selena A. 5 W - Daughter - at home 44 44 44 James E. 3 W - at home 44 44 44 ??tis E. 5/12 W-Son 44 44 44 Wilson, Jane 84 W - Boarder 44 44 44 20-20 Bryson, G (unreadable) 40 W - Farmer NC NC NC Dorcas J. 36 W - Wife - Keeping house 44 44 44 Sarah L. 15 W - Daughter 44 44 44 William C. 13 W - Son - Farm Laborer 44 44 44 James R. 11 W - Son - Farm Laborer 44 44 44 Callumbus W. 9 W - Son - at home 44 44 44 John B. 5 W - Son - at home 44 44 44 Wesley D. 1 W-Son 44 44 44 21-21 Morrison, Hosea 47 W - Farmer NC NC NC Sarah 37 W - Wife - House keeping SC SC SC Emma T. 2 W - Daughter NC NC SC Henry T. 11/12 W-Son 44 44 44 22-22 Franks, Thomas H. 26 W - Farmer NC NC NC Marthy J. 29 W - Wife - House keeping 44 44 44 Sarah R. 4 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Leroy P. 2 W-Son 44 44 44 23-23 Moss, Thomas L. 30 W - Farmer NC NC NC Harette E. 25 W - Wife - House keeping 44 44 44 John C. 7 W ~ Son 44 44 44 24-24 Bryson, Samuel C. 40 W - Farmer NC NC SC Margart C. 37 W - Wife - House keeping NC NC NC Wm.H. 12 W - Son - Farm Laborer 44 44 44 Henry H. 9 W - Son - at home 44 44 44 Mary R. 7 W - Daughter - at home 44 44 44 Hill, ?rcis E. (Francis?) 18 W - Boarder NC NC SC Henderson, James 30 W - Farm Laborer NC NC NC 25-25 Woodring, Luther 29 W - Farmer NC NC NC Sarah A. 19 W - Wife - House keeping 44 44 44 Florence 3 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Mary E. 2 W - Daughter 44 44 44 Paxton, Leser 19 W - Boarder 44 44 44 26-26 Monteith, Thomas 30 W - Farmer NC NC NC Mary E. 26 W - Wife - House keeping SC SC SC James C. 3 W-Son NC NC SC John W. 2 W~ 44 44 44 Otelia R. 10/12 W- 44 44 44 104 Journeys Through Jackson 2 0 2 0 V o L 3 Descendants of William Solomon Parker, Sr. ED: If you have any corrections or additions to this article, please feel free to contact us with them. 139. Tracy Marcus McCall was bom January 15, 1865 in Transylvania County North Carolina, and died January 25, 1935 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. He married Emily Louise McCall February 16, 1888 in Transylvania County, North Carolina, daughter of James McCall and Sarah Garren. She was bom November 23, 1870 in Gloucester Township, Transylvania County, North Carolina, and died November 16, 1938 in Gloucester Township, Transylvania County, North Carolina. Notes for Tracy Marcus McCall: 1920 Gloucester Township, Transylvania Co., NC Federal Census, Enumerated Jan 13, 1920 by Louie Galloway, Pages 2A & 2B, Family #32: McCall, Dock M., Head, age 55, NC, Fanner; Louise, Wife, age 49, NC; Alvey, Son, age 22, NC, Laborer; Melvin, Son, age 18, NC, Farm Laborer; Ollie, Daughter, age 16, NC; Harry, Son, age 13, NC; Rosco, Son, age 11, NC; Lois, Daughter, age 9, NC 1930 Gloucester Township, Transylvania Co., NC Federal Census, Enumerated Apr 31,1930 by Willie V. Galloway, Page 7A, Family #119: McCall, Tracy M., Head, age 65, Married at age 22, NC, Farmer; Emily L., Wife, age 59, Married at age 17, NC; Alvey, Son, age 32, NC, Pulp Mill Laborer; Lois, Daughter, age 19, NC Children of Tracy McCall and Emily McCall are: i. Birge Alvin McCall, b. March 28, 1895, Gloucester Township, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. November 22, 1980, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina. 289. ii. Melvin McCall, b. April 29, 1900, Gloucester Township, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. February 20, 1999, Transylvania County, North Carolina, iii. Ollie McCall, b. 1902, Gloucester Township, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 290. iv. Clifton Harry McCall, b. December 25, 1905, Gloucester Township, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. January 31, 1987, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina. 291. v. Roscoe McCall, b. 1907, Gloucester Township, Transylvania County, North Carolina, vi. Lois McCall, b. 1910, Gloucester Township, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 140. John Ansel McCall was bom March 19, 1858 in Transylvania County North Carolina, and died April 05, 1931 in Pickens County, South Carolina. He married Armintia Sabrina Orr August 08, 1880 in Transylvania County, North Carolina, daughter of James Orr and Catherine Shipman. She was bom August 01, 1862 in Transylvania County North Carolina, and died March 04, 1940 in Pickens County, South Carolina. Children of John McCall and Armintia Orr are: i. Judy Haseltine McCall, m. John Stephen Mason; b. 1872; d. 1945. ii. Rhoda Catherine McCall, m. Thomas Wilborn Mason; b. 1879; d. 1959. iii. Elijah McCall, m. Tina Mason; b. 1883; d. 1926. 141. William Jackson Owen was bom March 15, 1861, and died March 06, 1936 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. He married (1) Lucinda E. Shelton, daughter of Jackson Shelton and Isabella Shelton. She was bom August 13,1866 in North Carolina, and died November 07,1959 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. He married (2) Elizabeth Margaret Parker March 10, 1886 in Jackson County, North Carolina. She was bom 1864. Child of William Owen and Elizabeth Parker is: 292. i. Elijah Garfield Owen, b. October 17, 1892, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. October 23, 1963, Jackson County, North Carolina. 142. Pauline Evaline Owen was bom Febmary 13, 1855 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died December 11,1929 in Jackson County, North Carolina. She married James Sebastain Hoxit June 05, 1873 in Jackson County, North Carolina, son of Andrew Hoxit and Martha Slatton. He was bom September 20,1852 in South Carolina, and died January 04, 1894 in Jackson County, North Carolina. Children of Pauline Owen and James Hoxit are: 105 Journeys Through Jackson 293. i. Davis E. Hoxit, b. November 11, 1881, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. March 19, 1962, Jackson County, North Carolina. 294. ii. Martha S. Hoxit, b. April 29, 1889, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. December 26, 1964, North Carolina. 295. iii. Rosa Roxie Hoxit, b. March 24, 1894, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. June 10, 1979, Jackson County, North Carolina. iv. Vaughn Hoxit. 296. V. Virgil Hoxit, b. September 08, 1874; d. October 15, 1906, Transylvania County, North Carolina. vi. William Hoxit, b. March 11, 1876, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. April 09, 1876, Jackson County, North Carolina. 297. vii. Bell Hoxit, b. March 04, 1877, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. May 15, 1937, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 298. viii. James Estes Hoxit, b. November 05, 1880; d. June 28, 1948, Henderson County, North Carolina. ix. Samuel Hoxit. 299. X. Cordelia Hoxit, b. January 20, 1884, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. Febmary 07, 1948, Jackson County, North Carolina. 300. xi. Madison Monroe Hoxit, b. Febmary 18, 1887, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. February 1974, Jackson County, North Carolina. 301. xii. Harley Victor Hoxit, b. August 26, 1891, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. Febmary 11, 1946, Transylvania County North Carolina. 143. Isaiah Owen was bom January 22, 1859 in Jackson County, North Carolina, and died July 14, 1935 in Jackson County, North Carolina. He married Martha Elmina Mason March 09, 1882 in Transylvania County, North Carolina, daughter of William Mason and Nancy Bracken. She was bom September 25, 1863 in Jackson County, North Carolina, and died January 17, 1962 in Jackson County, North Carolina. Children of Isaiah Owen and Martha Mason are: 302. i. Martha Owen. 303. ii. Levia Owen, b. July 08, 1884, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. July 01, 1941, Jackson County, North Carolina. iii. Sinia Owen, b. December 04, 1882, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. January 14, 1883, Jackson County, North Carolina. 304. iv. James Harrison Owen, b. June 11, 1888, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. June 13, 1983, Jackson County, North Carolina. v. William Walker Owen, b. AprilOl, 1890, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. July 16,1891, Jackson County, North Carolina. vi. Wiley Isaiah Owen. 305. vii. Blye Marcus Owen. viii. Hiley Mae Owen. ix. Pearlie Victoria Owen. x. Minnie Owen. xi. Elva Irene Owen. 144. James Milford Owen was bom January 13, 1865 in Transylvania County, North Carolina, and died April 04, 1947 in Jackson County, North Carolina. He married Dovie Elizabeth Mathis February 14, 1884 in Jackson County, North Carolina, daughter of John Mathis and Sarah Cathey. She was bom April 16, 1868 in Jackson County, North Carolina, and died May 29, 1937 in Jackson County, North Carolina. Children of James Owen and Dovie Mathis are: i. Lola Vera Owen, b. 1911; d. 2001; m. (1) Tom Buchanan; m. (2) Jess Breedlove. 306. ii. Ethel Ivalee Owen, b. March 31, 1885, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. December 05, 1953, Jackson County, North Carolina. iii. Lenora Owen, b. May 1888; d. January 17, 1956; m. Victor Brown; b. April 04, 1881, Jackson County, North Carolina. iv. Floda Owen, b. July 05, 1890, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. July 13, 1891, Jackson County, North Carolina. 106 307. V. 308. vi. vii. 309. viii. ix. 310. X. Journeys Through Jackson 2020 VoL 3 Jackson County, North Carolina. Jackson County, North Carolina. Flora Naomi Owen, b. December 1891; m. Melvin Owen; b. 1908; d. November 12, Transylvania County, North Carolina. Bonnie B. Owen, b. 1905; d. 1983. 145. Mary Caroline Owen was bom February 10, 1867, and died October 22, 1932. She married Andrew Elias Galloway January 24, 1884, son of Josiah Galloway and Elizabeth Shelton. He was bom June 28, 1867, and died March 24, 1945 in Jackson County, North Carolina. Children are listed above under (110) Andrew Elias Galloway. 146. Martha Jane Owen was bom October 25, 1873 in Jackson County, North Carolina, and died May 05, 1959 in Jackson County, North Carolina. She married Weston Ulysses Mathis June 26, 1892 in Jackson County, North Carolina, son of John Mathis and Sarah Cathey. He was bom June 22, 1869 in Jackson County, North Carolina, and died Febmary 23, 1938 in Jackson County, North Carolina. Children of Martha Owen and Weston Mathis are: i. Infant Mathis, d. June 24, 1893, Triplets - Jackson County, North Carolina. 311. ii. Lola Jane Mathis. Mada H. Mathis. Hattie M. Mathis, b. May 28, 1894, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. October 01, 1976, Brevard, North Carolina. MattieL. Mathis, b. May 15,1896, North Carolina; m. Garfield Nicholson; b. 1891, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. 1956, Jackson County, North Carolina. Grace Lenoir Mathis, b. May 04, 1898; m. Ralph Nicholson. Lester C. Mathis, b. May 03, 1900, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. November 29, 1976, Henderson County, North Carolina. Anzel Ulysses Mathis, b. Febmary 06, 1905, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. August 11, 1990, Jackson County, North Carolina. Leora Mathis, b. May 15,1906, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. March 30, 1988, Jackson County, North Carolina. Nota Bea Mathis, b. March 19, 1909, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. January 19, 1996, Jackson County, North Carolina. Alvin T. Mathis, b. June 06, 1911, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. December 15, 1929, Jackson County, North Carolina. John Claude Mathis, b. December 28, 1902, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. April 06, 1971, Transylvania County, North Carolina; m. Pearl Massingale; b. June 27,1908, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. September 14, 1997, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 147. Thomas Clingman Owen was bom Febmary 25,1857 and died May 02, 1930. He married Perthania Thanie Ann Mason, daughter of William Mason and Nancy Bracken. She was bom March 14, 1858 and died March 24, 1924. Child of Thomas Owen and Perthania Mason is: 316. i. ELBERT JACKSON® OWEN, b. November 04, 1883, North Carolina; d. March 01, 1968. 111. 312. iv. V. vi. 313. vii. 314. viii. 315. ix. X. xi. xii. 148. Annie Caroline Owen was bom March 11, 1870 in Jackson County, North Carolina. She married John Harrison Cook October 02, 1896 in Jackson County, North Carolina. He was bom Abt. 1868 in Jackson County, North Carolina, and died April 24, 1949 in Clay County, North Carolina. 107 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 Vol 3 Children of Annie Owen and John Cook are: i. Zailie D. Cook, b. November 1896. ii. Emma Jane Cook, b. August 06, 1901. 149. Rhoda Haseltine Owen was bom December 18, 1857 in Jackson County, North Carolina, and died April 10, 1939 in Jackson County, North Carolina. She married William Clark Fisher February 21, 1879 in Transylvania County, North Carolina, son of William Fisher and Harriet Sims. He was bom 1856 in Transylvania County North Carolina, and died December 05, 1929 in Jackson County, North Carolina. Children of Rhoda Owen and William Fisher are: 317. i. Thomas Mack Fisher, b. September 1893, Jackson County, North Carolina. 318. ii. Lee Onders Fisher, b. September 14, 1889, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. December 23, 1982, Jackson County, North Carolina. iii. Claude Fisher, b. July 1882. iv. F. Cleveland Fisher, b. January 08, 1885, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. January 18, 1962, Jackson County, North Carolina. V. Ira Fisher, b. May 1897. vi. Samuel Fisher, b. October 1892. 150. Marintha Josephine Owen was bom January 27, 1863 in Transylvania County, North Carolina, and died Febmary 01, 1952 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. She married Zebulon Vance Galloway December 08, 1878 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. He was bom January 13, 1858 in Transylvania County, North Carolina, and died July 03, 1941 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. Child of Marintha Owen and Zebulon Galloway is: i. Ransom C.Galloway, b. April 1889; m. Lillie Mae Wood; b. October 23, 1882, Jackson County, North Carolina. 151. Mary Magdaline Owen was bom April 23, 1867 in Transylvania County, North Carolina, and died October 24, 1952 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. She married William Walker Galloway November 27, 1887 in Transylvania County, North Carolina, son of Robert Galloway and Susan McCall. He was bom May 18, 1860 in Transylvania County, North Carolina, and died December 12, 1955 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. Marriage Notes for Mary Owen and William Galloway: Witness Vance Galloway and Milford McCall. Married by Josie Galloway, J.P. Children of Mary Owen and William Galloway are: 319. i. Sylvitha Lura Galloway, b. January 08, 1889, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. March 05, 1962, Transylvania County, North Carolina. ii. Carl Galloway, b. February 08, 1891. iii. Press Galloway, b. February 21, 1893. iv. Callie Galloway, b. May 15, 1896. V. Josie Galloway, b. November 19, 1899. vi. Alivene Galloway, b. April 12, 1902. vii. Alsie Galloway, b. May 19, 1905. viii. Daisy Galloway, b. April 06, 1908. ix. Gordon Galloway, b. December 07, 1910; d. February 20, 1912. 108 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 Vol 3 1957,1958 Jackson County Death Certificates of Persons Born 1900 - 1957,1958 [Key to reading the following; Name of deceased; Date of birth; Place of birth; 1957, 1958 date of death; Father's name; Father's place of birth; Mother's name; Mother's place of birth; Informant's name; Informant's address; Cemetery. Abstracted by Sanji Talley Watson in the Jackson County Register of Deeds Office 2020.] Some of the certificates are labeled as towns and communities instead of the townships. Barkers Creek King, Grover Rosevelt; h/o Mattie May King; 14 Apr 1921; Barkers Creek; 26 Feb; Tom King; ng; Dora Gibson; ng; Tom King; Barkers Creek; Bee Knob Canada Harris, Ella Lee; w/o William Vess Harris; 3 Sep 1901; Jackson Co.; 30 Jan; Lee Phillips; ng; Deborrah Matthews; ng; William Vess Harris; Tuckaseegie; Owens Middleton, Roy Abbott; 1 Dec 1925; NC; 18 Mar; Spurgeon Middleton; ng; Delia Watson; ng; Spurgeon Middleton; Tuckaseigee; Family Cemetery Farley, Marvin Reid; 22 May 1925; Putman Co., GA; 16 Apr; James D. Farley; ng; Annie Claire Reid; ng; Mrs. Armie Farley, Rt. #4, Eatonton, GA, Central Cemetery, Putman Co., GA Chastain, Richard Lee: 19 Apr 1921; Tuckaseigee; 5 Sep; E. L. Chastain; ng; Laura J. Shook; ng; E. L. Chastain; Tuckaseigee; Shook (Cove) Caney Fork Wood, Carla Sue: 27 Apr 1953; NC; 3 May; Oscar Wood; ng; Bertha Hensley; ng; Lon Morgan; Cullowhee; Balsam Grove Cashiers Russell, Leonard Thomas; 8 Aug 1937; Glenville; 20 Jan; Jesse Russell; ng; Pearl Rochester; ng; Jesse Russell; Cashiers; Glenville Cullowhee Brown, Billy Lee; 4 Mar 1948; Asheville, NC; 25 Feb; Fred W. Brown; ng; Ruby Lee Teague; ng; Fred W. Brown; Cullowhee; Brown . Hampton, James Andrew; h/o Thelma Hampton; 30 Aug 1913; Yancey Co., NC; 10 Mar; James Hampton; ng; Essie H. Ray; Thelma Hampton; Sylva; Mars Hill, NC. Dillsboro Pangle, Claude London: h/o Mrs. Millie Wilson Pangle; 18 Jun 1904; Dillsboro; 27 May; George Pangle; ng; Carrie Sutton; ng; Henry Pangle; Rt. #2, Sylva; Locust Field Qualla Jordan, Onley William: h/o Roxie Ward; 4 Jul 1905; NC; 18 Apr; Otto Jordan; ng; Severy Hughes; ng; Mrs. O. V. Jordan; Rt. #1, Whittier; Sherrill River Turner, Horace Nathan; (1913); McDowell Co., NC; 17 Feb; Edward Turner; ng; Bessie Hawkins; ng; Sam Duncan; Rt. 1, Marion, NC; Marion, NC 109 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 Vol 3 Moss, Aura Lee: 26 Apr 1919; Glenville, NC; 27 Sep; Henry Bryson; ng; Elva Nicholson; Western Moss; ng; Glenville Scott Creek Norman, David Gryson; 27 Dec 1917; NC; 20 Mar; David A. Norman; ng; Etta Crawford: ng; David Norman; Rt. #1, Sylva; Family Cemetery Beck, Nelson J.: h/o Eva Bamett; 5 Nov 1901; NC; 22 Nov; Aiden L. Beck; ng; Cynthia Hall; ng; Mrs. Eva B. Beck; Balsam; Balsam Baptist Church Cemetery Sylva Harris, James Gary; 18 Apr 1950; Argura; 21 Jan; James Harris; ng; Francis Talley; ng; James Harris; Tuckasegee; WolfMtn. Howell, Jesse Rosevelt; h/o Carrie Howell; 25 Jan 1903; Sylva; Lee Howell; ng; Laura Dorsey; ng; Carrie Howell; Sylva; Keener Crawford, Mary Edith; 7 Jul 1904; Webster; 24 Feb; W. R. Sherrill; ng; Mary Cowan; ng; Evelyn Sherrill; Sylva; Keener Berrong, Lee Roy; 26 Apr 1915p Greene Co., GA; 12 Mar; Charlie Grady Berrong; ng; Mattie Lou Aperson; ng; Mr. Fred Berrong; Greensboro, GA; Greensboro, Greene Co., GA Wild, Jessie May; 2 Apr 1900; Barnwell, SC; 28 Mar; Joseph Brown; ng; Unknown; ng; Edith Fullbright; Sylva; Keener Greene, Ralph Sevire; h/o Maude Greene; 27 Feb 1921; Dillsboro; 4 Apr; Lon Greene; ng; Nora Brown; ng; Mrs. Ralph Greene; Dillsboro; Locust Field Clayton, Martha: 18 May 1957; Sylva; 19 May; Johnnie Clayton; ng; Cathryn McGuire; ng; Johnnie Clayton; Culiowhee; Cullowhee Wood, Alfred Dewey: h/o Annie Wood; 4 Dec 1905; Tuckasegee; 26 May; John Wood; ng; Anna J. Middleton: ng; Annie Wood; Sylva; Keener Welch, Brenda Dale: 7 Aug 1952; Macon Co., NC; 21 May; Otis Welch; ng; Thomasine Hurst; ng; Otis Welch; Franklin, NC; Tellico Cemetery, Macon Co., NC. Phillips, Mary Lynn: 15 Dec 1956; Jackson Co.; 2 Jun; William N. Phillips; ng; Lucille Thorpe; ng; William N. Phillips; 18 Ferguson St., Waynesville, NC; Old Field O'Quinn, Glenn Edward: 26 Nov 1921; Harnett Co., NC; 22 Jul; Curtis O'Quinn; ng; Anna Mills; ng; R. B. O'Quinn; Lillington, NC; ng Eblen, J. Gilbert: h/o Louise Carr Eblen; 25 Oct 1906; Louden Co., TN; 24 Aug; J. G. Eblen; ng; Janie Jones; ng; Mrs. J. Gilbert Eblen; Highland Memorial, Knoxville, TN Penninger, Mitzi Gay: 8 Jan 1956; NC; 31 Jul; William Penninger; ng; Dorothy Ashe; ng; William Penninger; Rt#l, Sylva; McCall Cemetery, Jackson Co. Bradley, Samuel Arriels: 1 Apr 1922; Cashiers; 12 Nov; Sam Bradley; ng; Cara Rice; ng; Sam Bradley; Cashiers; Zachary MUls, Theodore: h/o Atlas Hensley Mills; 27 Feb 1913; NC; 30 Dec; Bud Mills; ng; Mell Henry; Mrs. Theodore Mills; Sylva; Hooper Cemetery Webster Haskett, Fred Andrew; 4 Dec 1956; California; 17 Apr; R. L. Haskett; ng; Lona Markel; ng; R. L. Haskett; Webster; Webster Whittier Davis, James Edward: 8 Feb 1927; Whittier; 16 Aug; Andrew Davis; ng; Polly Williams; ng; Andrew Davis; Rt. #2, Whittier, NC; Whittier 110 Journeys Through Jackson 2020 Vol J 1958 Barkers Creek Buchanan, Bob NMI: 12 Aug 1904; NC; 24 Aug; ng; ng; Florence Buchanan; NC; Elbert Games; Dillsboro; Old Savannah Cashiers Wright, Charlie Franklin: 5 Apr 1923; Hilton Village, VA; 12 Mar; Joseph Wright; ng; Jeanevie Hawkins; ng; Mrs. Joseph Wright; Cashiers; Upper Cemetery (Zachary), Cashiers Ashe, Charles Lyman: h/o Margaret Reece Ashe; 14 Mar 1929; NC; 3 Jun; Fred Ashe; ng; Etha Middleton; ng; Fred Ashe; Forks, WA; Cathey's Creek Cemetery, Transylvania Co., NC Dillsboro Bryson, Margie NMI: w/o Robert Bryson; 5 Jun 1919; NC; 20 Jul; John Fisher; ng; Florence Love; ng; Robert Bryson; Sylva; Parris Cemetery Wilde, Early: h/o Elevlyn Wilde; 2 Jun 1902; Webster; 26 Oct; Lee Wilde; ng; Fannie Jacobs; ng; Elevlyn Wilde; Dillsboro; Keener Cemetery Greens Creek Green, David Estes: 22 Mar 1902; NC; 7 Feb; Clingman Green; ng; Lou Buchanan; ng; Mrs. Guss Cochran; Whittier; Greens Creek Qualla Bradley, Edna Long: w/o Walter Bradley; 3 Apr 1907; Cherokee; 18 Jan; Joseph Long; ng; Sallie Crow; ng; Lucy Long; Cherokee; Long Cemetery, Cherokee, NC Sutton, Julia Kimsey: w/o Arthur Sutton; 15 Nov 1905; NC; 11 Mar; Jom Kimsey; ng; Margaret Carver; ng; Arthur Sutton; Rt. #1 Whittier; Sutton Cemetery, Swain Co., NC Hornbuckle, Naomi Ruth: 18 Mar 1958; NC; 29 Mar; Ernest Hombuckle; ng; Laura Long; ng; Tribal Census Records; Cherokee; Family Cemetery, Cherokee Howell, Mary Kathryn: w/o David Hugh Howell; 4 Jun 1931; Swain Co., NC; 2 Apr; D. H. Haynes; ng; Lora Lambert; ng; David H. Howell; Whittier; Hyatt Chapel Cemetery, Whittier Eplee, Thurman Washington: h/o Ida Lee Calton; 12 Sep 1911; Rutherford Co. NC; 27 Jun; Albert Eplee; ng; Hattie Bradley; ng; Mrs. Ida Lee Eplee; Fletcher, NC; Shepherd Memorial Park, Henderson Co., NC River Luker, Dennis Ray; 4 Sep 1956; NC; 4 Feb; Ralph Luker