Southern Appalachian Digital Collections

  • 1990s (60)
  • 2000s (48)
  • 2010s (37)
  • 2020s (4)
  • 1500s (0)
  • 1600s (0)
  • 1700s (0)
  • 1800s (0)
  • 1810s (0)
  • 1820s (0)
  • 1830s (0)
  • 1840s (0)
  • 1850s (0)
  • 1860s (0)
  • 1870s (0)
  • 1880s (0)
  • 1890s (0)
  • 1900s (0)
  • 1910s (0)
  • 1920s (0)
  • 1930s (0)
  • 1940s (0)
  • 1950s (0)
  • 1960s (0)
  • 1970s (0)
  • 1980s (0)
  • Jackson County (N.C.) (150)
  • Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Asheville (N.C) (0)
  • Avery County (N.C.) (0)
  • Blount County (Tenn.) (0)
  • Buncombe County (N.C.) (0)
  • Cherokee County (N.C.) (0)
  • Clay County (N.C.) (0)
  • Graham County (N.C.) (0)
  • Great Smoky Mountains National Park (N.C. and Tenn.) (0)
  • Haywood County (N.C.) (0)
  • Henderson County (N.C.) (0)
  • Knox County (Tenn.) (0)
  • Knoxville (Tenn.) (0)
  • Lake Santeetlah (N.C.) (0)
  • Macon County (N.C.) (0)
  • Madison County (N.C.) (0)
  • McDowell County (N.C.) (0)
  • Mitchell County (N.C.) (0)
  • Polk County (N.C.) (0)
  • Qualla Boundary (0)
  • Rutherford County (N.C.) (0)
  • Swain County (N.C.) (0)
  • Transylvania County (N.C.) (0)
  • Watauga County (N.C.) (0)
  • Waynesville (N.C.) (0)
  • Yancey County (N.C.) (0)
  • Newsletters (150)
  • Albums (books) (0)
  • Artifacts (object Genre) (0)
  • Cards (information Artifacts) (0)
  • Clippings (information Artifacts) (0)
  • Crafts (art Genres) (0)
  • Drawings (visual Works) (0)
  • Envelopes (0)
  • Financial Records (0)
  • Fliers (printed Matter) (0)
  • Glass Plate Negatives (0)
  • Internegatives (0)
  • Land Surveys (0)
  • Letters (correspondence) (0)
  • Manuscripts (documents) (0)
  • Maps (documents) (0)
  • Memorandums (0)
  • Minutes (administrative Records) (0)
  • Negatives (photographs) (0)
  • Occupation Currency (0)
  • Paintings (visual Works) (0)
  • Photographs (0)
  • Postcards (0)
  • Programs (documents) (0)
  • Publications (documents) (0)
  • Questionnaires (0)
  • Scrapbooks (0)
  • Sheet Music (0)
  • Slides (photographs) (0)
  • Sound Recordings (0)
  • Specimens (0)
  • Speeches (documents) (0)
  • Text Messages (0)
  • Tintypes (photographs) (0)
  • Transcripts (0)
  • Video Recordings (physical Artifacts) (0)
  • Text (150)
  • MovingImage (0)
  • Sound (0)
  • StillImage (0)

Journeys Through Jackson 2002 Vol.12 No.07-08

  • record image
  • Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. The journal began as a monthly publication in July 1991, was published bimonthly from 1994 to 2003, and continues today as a quarterly publication. The journal issues in this digital collection are presented as annual compilations.
  • ^ Ky Ky J o u r n e y s T h r o u g h J a c k s o n T h e O f f i c i a l J o u r n a l o f t h e J a c k s o n C o u n t y G e n e a l o g i c a l S o c i e t y , I n c. C V o l . X I I , N o . 7 - 8 J u l y - A u g u s t 2002 JACKSON COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, INC. 2002 Officers President Dorris D. Beck Vice President L. Roy Shuler Secretary Lynn AUen Treasurer David C. Frizzell Librarian Dorris D. Beck Office Manager Peggy Q. Mason Computer Coordinator Deanne G. Roles Chair, Publications (Editor) R. Larry Crawford Journeys Through Jackson is the official publication of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. Members and non-members are invited to submit genealogical materials for publication, with the understanding that the editor reserves the right to edit these materials for genealogical content, clarity, or taste. The Society assumes no responsibility for errors of fact mat may be contained in submissions, and except where noted, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor or of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. The Society accepts no advertising for this publication except for notices for other non-profit groups. From the Editor In 2001, when we first pubUshed a Patriot issue, we were late with pubUcation, and the tragedy of September 11 had already happened when members received their journals. Almost a year later, we are stiU shocked and angry, but we are as resolved as ever that ignorance wiU not prevail. We are glad to present another Patriot issue this summer. In these pages, members wUl find contributions from no fewer than sixteen persons, fourteen of them Society members. How appreciative we are of their efforts! A few of the places in this issue might evoke tears, some wttl surely lead to smttes and fond memories, but aU are meant to honor those men and women who have sacrificed for aU of us. WhUe one of our most precious legacies as Americans is the freedom to disagree with poUcies, with poUticians, and even with wars, we should not disagree that those persons who have served our country should hold a place of honor. Enjoy the issue, and as always, your comments serve to make it better. V i s i t u s a t o u r W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w . m a i n . n c . u s / j c g s/ J y y Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 K , T a b l e o f C o n t e n t s i»M»«tfH»l >•••••*••••••••« Dedication.................... Jennings Photograph.., Burke County Tories... Turpin Photographs.-., Wood Photograph........ Sutton CivU W a r Letters. World War I Era...Materials at the National Archives. World War I Era...Examples of Draft Registration...... World War I Era...Rhinehart Interview......................... World War I I Era...Letters in the Ensley Family.......... World War I I E r a . . .Mincey Interview ............................ World War I I Era...Hoopers To Host Reunion., World War H Era...Wilson Photograph Patriots in the Famfly of JCGS Member Betty Painter Foti Patriots in the FamUy of JCGS Member Mary Rhinehart Shook...................... Patriots in the FamUy of JCGS Member Marie Powell Treadway.................... Veterans of Early Wars in Jackson County Cemeteries........................... ..... Brown Obituary .................»m......MM..M...„.........M...„.....................m..................... Patriots in the Family of JCGS Member Louise Brooks Snyder and a Salute.. Index.......................... x•••*••»•••••••••••«•••*•»•) >•••«•••••••••••••••••••*•< 103 104 .105-106 107 108 .109-112 .113 -114 115 116 .117-118 .119-120 121 122 ..123-124 .125-126 .127-128 .129-131 132 ..133-134 .135-136 Dedication K , As "Taps" brings to a close the final earthly chapter in the book of a quietly heroic life, we again stand in awe of the contributions and accomplishments of our veterans. With gratitude, we dedicate this Patriot issue to the memory of JCGS member Carl FrizzeU. Our Mend, we shaU miss you, but we are firm in our convictions that after this final battle, an eternal peace is yours. Carl Kellie FrizzeU: 24 May 1922 - 3 July 2002 (World War n , United States Army, 205th Battalion, Anti- Aircraft) 103 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 A m e r i c a n R e v o l u t i o n a r y W a r E r a . . . J a m e s J e n n i n g s KJ In the September - October 1998 issue of Journeys Through Jackson, we pubUshed the Revolutionary War Pension File of James Jennings. We apologize to the membership of the Society if the photograph above seems self - serving, but it shows your Editor at the grave of Jennings in Madison County. (Picture made and submitted by Rick Frizzell January 2002.) According to his file, Jennings was born 14 Feb 1857 in Buckingham County, Virginia. He served in the battles at Brandywine, Germantown, Princeton, and Trenton. After the war, he moved to Surry County, North Carolina, where he married Charity Burch. After her death, he was subsequently married to Hannah Martin. From his first marriage, he was the father of two sons, one of whom Uved in Macon County and is the ancestor of a large fanuly, and a daughter Charity, who married WUUam Cockerham of Surry County and who Uved at the Big Spring (near Wilmot) in Jackson County. Charity Jennings Cockerham was the ancestress of another large famtty who include a dozen or more JCGS members. James Jennings died 4 December 1837. He is the editor's fifth great - grandfather, through his daughter Charity Jennings Cockerham, her son John Burch Cockerham, his daughter Brunetta Cockerham Wilson, her daughter Sarah Wilson Norman, her son James Edward Norman, and his daughter Hazel Norman Crawford. \ J Ky 104 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 C A m e r i c a n R e v o l u t i o n a r y W a r E r a . . . L i t i g a t i o n A g a i n s t B u r k e C o u n t y T o r i e s [Ed. Although we do not know the final outcome of all of this proceeding, the list of names alone is worth our publication, simply because of the importance of Burke County as a parent county to so many of the counties in the mountains of Norm Carolina. Submitted by JCGS member Rick Frizzell from research in the North Carolina State Archives January 2002.] Burke County The State of North Carolina To the Sheriff of the County aforesd Greeting Whereas an Inquisition of High Treason Felony a Forfeitur of Estate against sundry persons hereafter named hath been formed and presented by the Grand Jury for the body of the said County of Burke to the County Court of Pleas and Quarter sessions for the Same County...willing that what is Right and Just should be done in the premises, Do therefore Command you that you make known to Ky Abraham Fleming Isaac Martin Shadrach Inman Tho Young Charles McPeters Veazy Husbands Tho Whitson Joseph Murry Joseph Holt Jno Murry Jeremiah Clarke Alexander Clarke Matthew Sharp James Wilson Wm Baldwin Joshua Baldwin Jno Baldwin Elisha Baldwin Jacob Baldwin Jno Grider Spencer WUson John Simpson Abraham Hofshaw Joshua Murry David Murry Tho Simpson Paschal Eastis Jacob Beck Joseph McPeters Jonathan McPeters Chas Coker Wm Coker Chas Smith Abraham Little Jno Deal Robert PoweU JohnOrr Jacob Surdemire John Dement Tho Brannon WmGray Nathal Burchfield Robert Pepper Gidion Gilbert Jonathan Gilbert Martin Shuford Jno Shuford Jacob Shuford Martin Burks John Burks James Burks Joseph Johnson Nimrod Shinalt Thomas Martin Henry Stoner George MUler Jacob Rynehart Jr. Jacob Rynehart Sr. Cunrod Rynehart John Stemy (?) Jr. Martin Coulter Senr Martin Coulter Jr PhUip Coulter George Icard Tho Low Henry Mcleroy Jonathan Robison David Hudson Henry Ashebranner Leonard Patterson Nicholas Fry Jr Christopher Rider Andrew Poldoson Joshua Hawes (Hawn?) Jacob Cottoner Jr Danl Shuford Peter Fry George Whitely David Douglas Joshua Young Levi Evans John Dudley (?) John Baker Jehu Baker Moses Baker WmOrr Dimion Baker Peter Holt Joseph Step Chas Eastis Sam Kellum Christian Isom Lazarius Philips Blake Pearcy Stephen Pearcy Chas BaUow Wm BaUow Birney Caps John SaUy 105 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Wm Clarke John Summers Michael Hart John Gibbs Jacob Summy John Connerly George Sealy Gilliam Harris Sam Brown John Fortenberry Richard Gibbs Robert Orr Edward Constant Richard Stringfield Thomas Pearson John Jeffers Adam Smith David Thompson David Nelson John Bradshaw Wm James John Pearson Michael Pearson James Barnes Ezekiel Stringfield Edward Leatherwood DanlGowin Hezekiah Hyatt Greenberry WUson John Sally Thomas Brown Wm Morris Thomas Raybom Andrew McClure John WUson David McCracking Robert Roseberry David WUUams Wm Lewis y That they and each of them be and appear before the Justices of said court at the courthouse in Burke on the third Monday in Janry next then and there to answer the sd Inquisition High Treason Felony of Forfeiture, found against these and each of these and to Show cause if any they have why they respectively Should not forfeit their Property both real and personal to the WUl of the pubUck according to Act of Assembly in such case made of provision; And why final Judgement against those for the same should not be extended in the same Court on the Inquisition aforsd, And this they shaU in no wise Omit under the pain and penelties that ShaU Ensue thereon. Witness Alexander Erwin of our said Court at Office third Monday in October Anno Domini 1782 and Seventh year of our independence Isl Wm Erwin by Alex. Erwin Clk [Ed. The litigation documents also list the witnesses called for each of the accused (with one page missing). Since the State had called its own witnesses against these "disaffected," as one document caUs them, we suppose that the witnesses Usted by each "Tory's"name are those attesting to the good character and actual behavior of the accused. One cannot help but wonder if some of those cited to appear were the victims of jealous neighbors, malicious gossip, and the high emotions of a time of crisis. As stated before, we do not know the final outcome of these proceedings, but a follow up on any of the accused and their eventual guUt or vindication would be welcome.] KJ Ky 106 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Ky A m e r i c a n C i v i l W a r E r a . . . T u r p i n P h o t o g r a p h s Ky Above, two of the sons of James HoUand Turpin and Jane Messer Turpin. On the left is James, who was born in 1837 and who died at MechanicsvUle 26 J u n 1862. At right is Henry Allen, born in 1841, and who died at Johnson's Island 15 Jan 1863. Both had entered Confederate service 27 Apr 1861. Photographs and factual information courtesy of Jometa Medford, who is a great - great granddaughter of James Holland Turpin. 107 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 A m e r i c a n C i v i l W a r E r a . . . P h o t o g r a p h o f J a m e s M a d i s o n W o o d y KJ The photograph above is of James Madison ("Cane") Wood, another CivU War veteran, made at Quinlandtown when Wood was age 98. Born in 1845 on Caney Fork, he moved to Quinlandtown in 1902, and Uved until 1945. His brothers were Jack, Jerry, Thad, Mai, and Hamilton Wood, the latter three of whom were also in the CivU War. James Madison Wood is buried at Rocky Branch Cemetery on Allen's Creek in Haywood County. For those members who are unfamUiar with the place names, Quinlandtown was a logging community at the head of Allen's Creek. Photograph and factual information submitted by JCGS member Vee Jones. y 108 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Ky Ky Ky S u t t o n C i v i l W a r L e t t e rs [Ed. In some past issues of Journeys Through Jackson, we have published letters from the sons of David Sutton. Of the three 'fighting in Virginia, son John would live the longest, and would write many letters home. We continue with -these letters here with another thanks to submitter JCGS member Betty Qneen Monteith.] Camp near Richmond Va May the 22,1862 Dear Father I this morning seat myself to write you a few lines to let you know that I am weU at this time and hoping the few lines may reach you aU weU, if it ever git there. I can inform you, we ain't been in nare fight yet, but don't know how soon. I think myself, mis wUl be deciding fight between the South and North. The force of our men from Weldon to Petersburg and from Petersburg to Richmond, the men is to numerous to talk about. I can say to you, we are in camps in about three miles from Richmond. I was in Richmond yesterday on some business, and I do think I saw two thousand men at one site on main street. And I could see three or four miles up and down the street an was aU over the city that way. Thest a working ahve with soldiers an they are about that thick for ten mUes around Richmond. You may know the number of men in that city, the is of men that dies in Richmond a day is about fifty. Right close to where we are camped at one graveyard, the was forty men buried in one day. We are a looking for the big battle of Richmond to come off ever day. When ever that battle come off, it wiU be the biggest battle that ever has been read of. They have drawn their line of battle in a short distance from Richmond to Petersburg. A straight line across. We have feU back from water. They can't come at us with their gun boats. If they ever come now, they come on land an that is the way we want to meet them. Ever time we get a clue at them on land, we and them nods. As we come on from Yorktown, General Hood's brigade and Colonel Hampton's brigade got them on land and Colonel Hampton hoUered "charge bayonet" and they flew like wild turkey. They can't stand the point of the bayonet. I can tell you we have travel about three hunder miles since I got back to the regiment, an now I think the thing wiU be decided before we travel much more. I have stack up to it all like a ram buck. Thanks God for hit. We are a drawing our portion of money here. That is the money due us when we first left. I will first have brothers James and SUas money drawn and sent to un by the first safe hand. The wiU draw all of their money this time. I won't draw aU of their money this time. When I draw aU my money, I want to send some of it home. I think I can send it by John C. Love. He is a talking about going home after the battle and staying a while. So teU aU the boys I wUl rit again in a few days to them all. Rit some, I like to hear from you aU. John Sutton to David Sutton Camp near Richmond VA June the 21,1862 Dear Brother I avaU myself of the present opportunity of writing you a few lines to let you know that I am in coming health at this time and hoping the few lines may find you all enjoying the same like health when it come to'hand. I can inform you I have been very bad off for about two weeks. I think I am on the mend at this time. I aint been a past going yet, but very weak. I received your 109 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 kind letter a few days ago an was glad to hear that aU was weU. I have received two letter from you since I have wrote am to you. Reason, I have been on picket about a week an aint had the time to rit. I rit ever chance I get, an I want you to do the same. Also I received a letter from ^J father stating aU was weU at home. I want you to rit to me and let me know how SaUy is getting. None of youens don't write anything about her. I aint heard since I left home. Is to fighting, we aint been in nare nother battle since, but they keep fighting along the line ever day. Our men bomb them aU day yesterday and made them fly like birds. I think the prospect is fair for another big fight in a few days. We was out on driU this morning an we could see them up in their baUoon a spying about on our men. Let off at them with the cannon, and they soon got doen. They made an attack on our picket line the other day, they thought they would git round over me and take them prisoner. Our men let off two cannons at them and kiU fifty Yankees at about two shots. It was right close to our camp. The Yankees throw cannon baUs in amounts over camp ever day, but don't do much damage. They cut off some horses legs, an soon they throw plumb over camp before they bust. The day I was in battle, they was a boom sheU struck a oak tree right over my head an several more of the boys, an cut the tree right off, an nare has struck us a taU. I was down on picket yesterday, an I could see the Yankees as thick as grasshopper. We would get out in field an look at them for to devU them. The CWcl^ominy River was between us. We lay all night in about seven hunder yards of them. It is very hot here at this time an water is very bad. A heap of times we have to drink out of mud hole an swamp, but where we are now the is a very good spring, but about three quarter miles from camp, an about twenty thousand men to get water out of it. So I must close for this time. You rit as soon as you get this letter an give me the news. You must give my respects to aU, an especiaUy the girl. So yours truly, John Sutton to Solomon Sutton Richmond VA \y July the 23,1862 Dear Father Seat myself to drop you a few lines to let you know that I think I am on the mend at this time. I have been very bad off and are weak yet, an hoping the few lines may find you aU well when it comes to hand. Lieutenant come over to our company yesterday, and says he wUl get the money of brothers now in a short time. An I wUl send it to you by the first chance. Ever thing is come here this morning. No news of fighting. I aint time to write much this morning for the maU is going out an I aint time to rit. You must rit to me an give me the news about Jackson. I aint able to rit. I will rit again in a short time if I have luck. So no more at this time. Yours truly John Sutton Camp near GordonsviUe VA August the 15,1862 Dear Brother I seat myself today to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am not weU yet. I have been sick about one month or better and I don't mend but very Uttle if any a taU. I have feU away to Ky 110 Ky Ky Ky Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 nothing. I would not weigh more than one hunder an twenty or thirty pounds. I received your kind letter on the 15 of August, an was glad to hear from you aU that you aU was weU. I never have enjoyed a good days health since the battle of Seven Pines and had to run so far before we got into the fight. It over heating, so I don't think I wUl get over it, but I am so that I can travel a Uttle along. You wrote to me that you wanted me an the boys to come to Tennessee, but I don't think we ever wUl git to come there. We have got off so far now at this time, we are now something at this time over one hunder nriles from Richmond. We are now under the command of Old StonewaU Jackson in die VaUey of Virginia. An I think we wiU have a heap of hard fighting to do in this part of Virginia. We had a hard battle here the other day. They was but two got kUl in our regiment, an very few got wounded. Our men kiU an wounded of the Yankee was estimated at about twenty-five hundred kill an wounded. Our men guned a great victim at this point. I was not in this last battle. I was not able to git thar. I was left back at the wagon with the sick men. You may be gone'before this letter git to you. If you are, the rest can read it. We are now in a purty country at this time. Water is very good at this place as it is in any place. You must rit to me as soon as you can, an give me all the news in Jackson. Yours truly, John Sutton to Solomon Sutton We have no stamps to maU our letter with. It is not because we have no money, we have got away from Richmond. We can't buy none a taU. [Ed. The above was the last letter we have of John Sutton. He was kiUed 23 July 1863 in Virginia.] Strawberry Plains, East Tennessee November the 1,1862 Dear Father I this evening hasten to drop you a few lines which leaves me well, ever hoping these few lines when they come to hand, to find you are aU weU. I heard this morning that my, sister was dead. I got the news in Mr. E.H. Cagle letter. I was grieved to hear that my fair sister was dead. It grieved me very much to hear the sad news of the departure of dear beloved sister, but as it was God's wUl, I suppose I need not grieve after her. I hope she has gone to rest though, I would love to have been there, but my being there would not a have helped the cause any. I would love to be at home and see you aU once more, but I cannot tell when I wiU be there. I want to come about Christmas if I can. You must aU write to me as often as you can. I wUl do the same. You must teU aU the folks howdy for me. If I live, I will come home when I get the chance. I would long to hear of the time when juice wUl be made so I can be at home with my friends. So you must write soon and often as you can, and I wiU do the same. Father, I want you to see about my com. Tend to it just right. So I wUl close. I remain your son tiU death. As ever, Solomon Sutton i l l Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Strawberry Plains, East Tennessee November 8*, 1862 Dear Brother I this evening seat myself to drop you a few lines which leaves me well, ever hoping these few lines when they come to hand that they may find you in good health. I have nothing worth writing to you at this time, more than we have hard time in camp. We have some sickness in camp of mumps, and has had some of fever. We lost one man out of our Co., John Martin. He died with the fever. He died on the 6th of this instant. John, I would love to see you and be with you so we could have some fun and drink some brandy together and have a spree. I heard that you had gone home and was very bad off. I want you to write to me and teU Brother Henry and WiUiam to write to me. I want you to teU Brother Henry to stay at home this winter and help Father to work. I would love for you to stay at home tiU about Christmas. I think I wiU be at home sometime between now and Christmas, I mink. So you must write to Strawberry Plains. So I remain your brother til death. As ever Solomon Sutton to John Sutton [Ed. In the July - August 1997 issue of JTJ, we pubUshed a Ust of some of the descendants of the pioneer John Sutton. We wUl repeat the David Sutton portion of that here. David Sutton was the "Father" to whom so many of these letters were addressed. He married Margaret Messer, and they were the parents often chUdren. William (1827 - 1910) married Margaret Sutton Elizabeth (1830 - ??) not married John (1832 - 1863) not married Solomon (1837 - 1894) survived the Civil War to marry Dorcas DiUs Henry (1838 - ??) not married James (1840 - 1861) not married SUas (1842 - 1861) not married Sally (1844 - ??) no record Minerva ( 1846 - ??) married WiUiam McMahan Delphey (1850 - ??) not married The sister to whom Solomon referred in his last letter would need to be either Elizabeth or SaUy. Both Minerva and Delphey were stiU Uving after the CivU War.] KJ Ky KJ 112 Journeys Through Jackson July— August 2002 Ky W o r l d W a r I D r a f t R e g i s t r a t i o n a n d O t h e r M a t e r i a l s A v a i l a b l e a t t h e N a t i o n a l A r c h i v e s - S o u t h e a s t R e g i o n [Ed. The following is condensed from a program presented by Larry Crawford at the June meeting of JCGS.] Part 1...Introduction 01) After several decades of smaUer conflicts and competition among the powers of Europe, World War I started in the summer of 1914. 02) The old Triple AUiance countries of Germany and Austria - Hungary (Italy switched sides) were joined by Bulgaria and the Ottoman Turks as the Central Powers; they fought against the former Triple Entente countries of Great Britain, France, and Russia, who were known as the AUied Powers. 03) The war, after a few months, became a war of attrition. "Trench warfare" was the typical mode of fighting for land forces, meaning that die soldiers inhabited deep ditches for weeks at a time. They would go out "oVer.the top" into "no man's land," an area of a couple of hundred yards between the trenches, whereupon the other side would mow them down. A couple of days later, the other side would do the same thing, with the same result. / 04) OfficiaUy the United States was neutral in the first three years of the war. Many recent w German immigrants were not eager to fight against their relatives, and large numbers of Americans considered the war a European problem. (American industry was making nice profits, seUing to both sides.) 05) Neutrality was jeopardized when the German submarines sank the "Lusitania," a British ocean liner, in 1915, an action that cost some 400 American Uves. But the more important catalyst for American entry into the war was the Zimmerman Telegram, in which Germany promised Mexico the American Southwest and CaUfornia if they would enter the war on the side of the Central Powers. The British intercepted the telegram, and turned it over to the United States, who declared war 6 April 1917. Part 2...Draft Registration 01) World War I was not the popular war mat World War II would be in just a few more years. WhUe a great many zealous men have always enlisted, this was a much different conflict from the Spanish-American War less than two decades previous, which was fought entirely by volunteer forces. 02) The Selective Service Act of 1917 (went before Congress in February) authorized the conscription of 500,00 men between the ages of 21 to 30. These numbers were stretched in August of 1918 to 18 and 45. , 03) Men registered at their local voting precincts .The local registrars fiUed out cards for aU W> eUgible men (over 1000 for Jackson County alone), and aU of these cards for the entire United States are housed in Atlanta, some 24 milUon of these documents. 113 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 04) Forms used were sUghtly different, but the cards were aU the same size. This is an exceUent genealogical source for dates of birth as weU as physical descriptions of the persons themselves. (In some cases, this might be the only place where some of this information was ever recorded. For example, we had plenty of persons who were bom in the late 1870's, died in the 1930's, never had a death certificate, never had any money, and have no grave markers. 05) To use these original documents, one must provide a driver's Ucense to be copied, must sign several forms, and must fiU out a request form for each box. The staff wUl then bring these materials to the work area for you, where you sign the request form that you have received the materials. The NARA furnishes pencU and paper for you to use in this room. You are aUowed to take only your person into this area. But then you are free to use the documents, and are also free to make copies of records like these cards, which is especiaUy helpful when the copying machine has toner. Of the copies I made over some three hours, aU except the very last were made on a machine in the actual archives themselves, to which I was escorted several times. (Security since September 11.) Part 3...What else is avaUable at the Archives? 01) The great majority of persons visiting the Archives are using the microfilm room. It has changed a great deal since I was there. One stiU need a research appointment for this room. 02) All of the avaUable Federal Census records are here on microfilm, as well as hundreds of roUs of other records. I have used this room at various occasions to look up Revolutionary War Pension files. 03) Some seven acres of materials are housed here, and I was informed that the Archives section of the center would be moving into a new facUity in a couple of years. Directions From Sylva, the best route is to go down 441 until you reach 1-985, then enter Atlanta on 1-85. Stay on 1-85 through downtown until you reach Langford Parkway (formerly Lakewood Freeway), and exit here westbound. From Langford Parkway, exit at the Fort McPherson exit and bear right onto Main Street. Follow Main Street about one nrile, foUowing the National Archives signs, and turn right onto Newman Avenue. On Newman, make an immediate left onto St. Joseph Avenue and go 1 Vi blocks to the Federal Records Center on the right. y Ky y 114 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Ky E x a m p l e s o f W o r l d W a r I D r a f t R e g i s t r a t i o n F o r m s | •215c. ___ '-..iii.-c.ii: -^sft-- ]*.-*!* .MH;^M, ^^y. 1.^fc« t*fm. •« * **ti'-W. «•» **••« — i i ^tr:-ik.-»^L _...'.'V^—- M&*$K-- j l«w.mbwi 9: s*a. .BM ..«•" —••U*K*&fcL*&M* - miliTriii *-T=2==S#==A 1 • •i &*f-di» ZASSkJ&t •_.!,.! 11- Ti-rrfnum .<wi4s rij? flt^t'^A-ja*& irf—•"—•»•• .-Qfa^Igssi^ '"~±. . t-A...^U.»A*-'^, . V i t e i i jL C if tr RECISTRAJCS urarr - ^MUKfli«ai4feM«=.n= ^•.•ju.»M).Bfc^iiwarfyt ' ^ • ' x l i ^ 0^,0-^^ fi,1--ff,-','i< t(rt*, y{ -^i£s£5- •:J KtClsmJSTVOH CMOS/ VX&LO--J, M»»<i-k....i/*ti*«iAv- *>>.- Z yJ I f "^7 ^ J»i!j ISM jj Il-Nrtj _ Jc***' . . ___ ****** -r.t.*e-«t*=.'-' q . _! i«aM(«gA;«N<*f' -•'l'i»*-3. -J u Above, two examples of World War I Registration cards. At the top is the father of JCGS member Helen Davis Cooper, at the bottom the father of JCGS member Marilyn Griffin Morton. The Archives copying machine copied the Griffin document backwards on the first try. We hope that these are legible for yon to see the types of information contained. 115 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 W o r l d W a r I E r a . . . T h e V a u g h n R h i n e h a r t I n t e r v i ew KJ [Ed. The following interview by Martha M. Medford was published in 1976. The subject was Vaughn Rhinehart of Haywood County, father of JCGS member Mary Rhinehart Shook. Reprinted by permission of The Waynesville Mountaineer.] I volunteered when I was 16 years old. I had to Ue to get in, and there were times when I was up there on the front in France when I might have bed to get out! I joined the WaynesvUle Company in the summer of 1916 (Ed. WaynesvUle Company H of the North Carolina National Guard). That was before we got into the war. I was sent to Camp Glenn at Morehead City, NC, for six months' training, and then was sent down to Texas, where we were having trouble on the Mexican border. Old VUla was giving us a hard time down there, supping over the border stealing horses, burning, and killing. After we got that settled, we came back to WaynesvUle and were mustered out for a short time. Then we were recaUed to active duty when the world war started. We were put in camp in WaynesvUle and trained for a while - the camp was about where the wholesale company and the Armory are now - before we were sent to South Carolina. In September, 1917, the WaynesvUle Company - Company H - was sent to Camp Sevier, in GreenviUe, SC. Faucett Swift was our Captain. In Greenville we were divided up and put in different companies. I shipped out from there on May 10, 1918, for Long Island, NY, and then rode a train to Montreal, Canada. From there we went to Halifax, Nova Scotia, and waited for the entire 30* Division to assemble. We saUed to Liverpool, England, on a cattle boat It took us 21 days. The reason it took us so long was that we were about to run into an iceberg. It was a regular mountain of ice, and we had to go around to miss it. I was the coldest on that ship I ever was in my Ufe. From Liverpool we were sent to Winchester for a couple of days, and from there to a camp in the south of France. We were supposed to stay there for six weeks' training, but only stayed three days because the 3rd Company's ammunition train was blown up by the enemy and our train, the 105 , was sent to take its place. We went on to Toul for a few days, and from there up to the front. Robert Scates and I got to the front tired out We stamped out a brush fire that had got started, Ky found some old tar paper to make us a bed, and went to sleep. On the morning of September 12, before daylight, we were awakened by loud gunfire practicaUy over our heads. It was one of our own guns, mounted on a railroad car. There hadn't been any railroad there when we went to sleep. Our engineers had run that railroad in during the night. I have to give a lot of credit to the engineers. Among the batties I took part in were the St, Mihiel offensive on Sept, 12 through 14, 1918, Meuse-Argonne on Sept. 26 to Oct. 8, and the defense of the Toul sector. Now I'll say this: you take the French people. They were mighty glad to see us when we got there: they claimed we were saving them. But after it was aU over, they blamed us for coming so late and claimed they won the war. After the Armistice we went into the Army of Occupation for six weeks in Luxembourg. I met the Grand Duchess whUe I was there. After that we went to LeMans, France, to have the Uce taken off us, and then we boarded ship for Charleston, SC. We were sent to Camp Jackson to be discharged, but before I left there I told the discharging officer that I thought it was a shame to send me home in my old ragged, dirty uniform. He took me down and gave me a new one, and when I was all dressed up I headed home. 116 KJ Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Ky W o r l d W a r I I E r a . . . L e t t e r s i n t h e E n s l e y F a m i l y [ The following materials are provided for publication by Margaret Ensley FrizzeU. The two letters are from her brother, CpL Jnlios Alvin Ensley, who served in Co. B of the 315* Infantry. Ensley was the father of JCGS member Betty Ensley Baird.] Ky England April 21 Dear Sis WUl answer your letter received yesterday was glad to know you hadn't forgot me but was sorry that you are thinking of marriage for I don't think it would be a wise thing with the war going why don't you wait a whUe yet any way don't think I am trying to run your life for you for I am not just saying what I think but I know it would be best to wait a while anyway Say how is your job, stiU like it as weU as you did? How Jong was Bud home for? I bet he had a time didn't he? What did he think of the new house? TeU aU of the folks heUo. I wiU write them soon. Boy the country here sure is nice everything is green everybody working it is not like the states weU the red cross sure has been nice, most aU of the recreation is by the red cross over here. Send me Wade Messer's address next time you write I wUl close by saying I hope this finds you aU ok Love Your Bro as ever fostkarte An l g t M i * l ^ ) » ^ a ^ , [Above, JuUus Alvin Ensley. To the right, a postcard sent to Margaret 9 Oct 1944. Notice that Ensley has advanced in rank. He was also a POW held by the Germans for a time. The text on the postcard foUows.] Kriegsgelangenenlager Dear sis just a few lines to let you know I am OK and haven't forgotten you TeU aU heUo hug and kiss Tommy and Betty for me be good and be single when I get there Love Alvin Ky 117 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 y [Above, left to right: Carl FrizzeU, Burgher Ensley, Louis Ensley at top right in the group photo. Carl FrizzeU was Margaret's husband; Burgher and Louis Ensley were brothers of Margaret and Alvin Ensley. The letter below was written to their parents, Asbury and Emma Dean Ensley.] England April 25 Dear Mom & all First a few lines to let you know I am still thinking of you all hoping this wiU find you all ok as it leaves me just fine. Things here is not an awful lot different than they are at home stuff is raisioned quit a bit more here and I believe as a hold the people are just as friendly as anyone I have ever been around I wonder would you send me Wade Messer address I might have a canch to see him while I am here I don't want you to worry about me for I am quite aUright looking forward to the day when I can come back I received Louis letter ok he sure is lucky to get his furloughs so often. Just what did he think of your new house I bet it was a surprise to him TeU dad he should see the farms here, they look like a city park as far as the country is concerned it is the most beautiful place I have ever seen you don't see any houses at aU built of lumber TeU Burger to take it easy I don't want any sister in laws that I haven't met Say are you aU putting out any crop this year I think Bonnie is going to buy (?) the com Tell Dad not to buy a house for me now wait a wlule yet. WeU I wiU close as news is short. Write. With Love your son Ky KJ 118 Journeys Through Jackson July -% August 2002 C L , ^ W o r l d W a r I I E r a . . . M i n c e y I n t e r v i ew [Ed. The following is an interview conducted and submitted by JCGS member Bean AUen Hudgins. She interviewed her uncle Wymer Lee Mincey about his World War II experiences.] I was bom March 2, 1921, in the Ridgecrest Community of Macon County, NC. At the young age of 17,1 enUsted in the United States Navy in September of 1939 and was shipped to the Naval Training Center at Norfolk, Virginia. After a rigorous basic training, I was sent to the Battleship USS Wyoming. In December of 1941 we got word that the Japanese had attacked Pearl Harbor, and the ship was brought back to Norfolk. The*Navy picked about 300 men to attend Naval Aviation Specialist School, and I was among those chosen from the Atlantic fleet. After completion of my schooling, I was assigned to the USS Gambier Bay. Our main objective was to help retake the PhiUppines from the Japanese. In our spare time we played cards, shot basketball and exercised to keep ourselves in good physical condition. On the morning of October 25, 1944,1 was awakened by the General Quarters CaU, but this was not unusual. We were located in Leyte Gulf with other Naval ships nearby. A httle after 8:00 a.m., our ship came under fire by a Japanese cruiser. After heavy shelling for over an hour, the Gambier Bay had sustained major damage. The engine room was flooded, there was no water or electricity, and the ship was Dead in the Water. At 8:50 a.m., the order to Abandon Ship was given by Captain Vewigg. Since we had lost our power, some of the crewmen never heard it. I jumped overboard and started swimming as fast as I could go so I wouldn't be taken into the vortex of the sinking ship. I ended up on a flotation net along with about 8 other men. The rafts were given to the wounded. The ocean was infested with sharks, and I remember seeing one man being bitten by one. We had no food and the only fresh water we had to drink was a small amount of rain water that we managed to catch in a tarp. I-remember one of the wounded had died, and Chaplain Verner Carlesen performed a service and the man was buried at sea. I was in the water 2 fuU days and 2 fuU nights. On the second day we had drifted close enough to the coast of Samar, Philippines, that we could see land on the horizon. A group of us had decided to try to swim to shore, hit the jungles and look for help from the Philippines who were our alUes during the war. We then talked ourselves out of it for fear Has Japanese had taken over the island and we would be captured by them. On the morning of the 3rd day we were picked up by a Patrol Craft boat and put aboard a hospital ship. After 3 days, myself and the other men with minor wounds were sent to HoUandia, New Guinea (Pancake HiU). From there we were shipped to AustraUa and then on to the United States. Three other ships fought gallantly in the Battle <?f Leyte Gulf, but were also sunk. They were the USS Hoel, the USS Samuel B. Roberts, and the USS Johnston. I beUeve the USS Gambier Bay was the only US Carrier sunk by naval gunfire during World War II. My commander on the ship was Fred "Buzz" Borries, who some might might remember as being one of the best football players the Naval Academy ever had. By the time I arrived in California, it had been over a month since the Gambier Bay had been sunk, and I knew my family back home probably thought I was lost at sea. I immediately found a phone and caUed my mother (Ethel Pressley Mincey) to let her and the rest of the fanuly know that I was stiU aUve. 119 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 After my one - month recovery leave in the States, I was assigned to the USS Vella Gulf and remained with that ship until the war ended. I then transferred to Shanghai, China, and found that tour of duty most interesting from a historical viewpoint. A few buddies and myself would go pheasant hunting in the rural areas around Shanghai near the Whangpoo River. We saw people Uving in viUages much the same way their ancestors had Uved hundreds of years ago. I was with one of the last groups to leave China before the Communists took control in 1947. y I was awarded 9 decorations for my participation in 8 different invasions within the South Pacific during World War II, including the Presidential Unit Citation. AU of my medals were lost when a Marine accidentaUy took my foot locker by mistake instead of his own. I was later assigned to the USS Fremont for 3 years, and then to the Allen M. Summner for 5 years. In September of 1961,1 retired from the Navy and have resided in CuUowhee since then. I have never lost my love for the sea, and wiU always be a saUor at heart. % Ky y 120 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 L , t I H o o p e r s t o H o s t R e u n i o n o f W o r l d W a r I I G r o u p [Ed. The foUowing was written and submitted by JCGS member Irene Bishop Hooper. We consider this to be a very meaningful addition to our Patriot issue this year, because our World1 War U veterans are becoming fewer every day. We hope that all who visit will have a glorious time.] The 377th Harbor Craft Company, a World War II group, wiU hold their 24th reunion in Jackson County. Veterans, wives, children and grandclnldren wiU be arriving on September 19th through the 21". Elmer and Irene Hooper of CuUowhee, longtime members of JCGS, wUl host the reunion at the new Best Western River Escape overlooking the Tuckaseigee River in DiUsboro. The company, made up of about 265 men, has now dwindled to fewer than 100 because of illness, aging and death. Among the men serving from Jackson County were Robert PhUUps of Sylva, now deceased, along with Elmer Hooper. They were inducted into the Army July 14, 1944, and sent to Franklin County, Florida. OdeU Griffin ofHendersonviUe, a,WCU basebaU player, was also a member of the 377th. The 159,348 acres, about 50 miles beyond TaUahassee, were used by the Army for basic and amphibious training. Prior to the war, the area was a fishing haven. Elmer Hooper said, "We were greeted in Florida by alligators, snakes, sand fleas and the blazing sun." Wives, sweethearts, parents and friends addressed their letters to the men at Camp Gordon Johnston, CarabeUe, FL. The base was known by the men as "HeU - By - the - Sea!" After a few short months of training, Hooper and PhUUps were shipped out together for duty in the South Pacific theater of operations. The men were given assignments at various locations and soon became separated. Hooper and PhiUips didn't see each other for some time during their 19 months in the Pacific, but while waiting to return to the States, they found themselves on the same ship. In August, 1946, they received their discharges at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. They didn't even mind the tiring bus ride back, for they would soon see Jackson County and their loved ones again. The 377th was made up of men from nearly every state in the USA. The reunions are held in or near a veteran's home town. Some places that have hosted the group are Ocean City, MD; Tucson, AZ; Cherokee, NC; San Francisco, CA; Alexandria Bay, NY; Eufaula, OK: Bessemer, AL; Cape Cod, MA; Duluth, MN; Reno, NV; Asheboro, NC; Hot Springs, AR: Colorado Springs, CO; Branson, MO; San Antonio, TX; Seatde, WA; Myrtle Beach, SC Syracuse, NY; Camp Gordon Johnston, FL; Meridian, MS; Auburn, CA; and Pigeon Forge, TN. Lest We Forget, a booklet of their reunions, was co-authored in 2001 by Irene and Mary Lou Hooper. Mary Lou Hooper is from Franklin, and her husband Robert Hooper, now deceased, fought with the 377th. In describing the bond that exists among the men, Elmer Hooper said, "WhUe fighting in the jungles of New Guinea and the PhiUppines, our very Uves depended on each other. After the war, we've staye4 in touch, and our friendship has grown stronger over these last 50 years. The journey of life has been made smoother by such faithful friends, my Army buddies!" 121 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 I • K ^ * J 9 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • a^B^B^B^B^B^BH y Above, the two gentlemen mentioned in the preceding article. To the left is S/Sgt James Robert PhUUps, to the right is T/S Dexter Elmer Hooper. W o r l d W a r n P h o t o g r a p h . . . B o n n e r R a y W i l s o n Bonner Ray Wilson, husband of JCGS member Virginia Hoyle WUson, served in the United States Navy from Jan. 23,1945, to Sep. 6,1946 aboard the USS Princeton, USS Caney, and USS Yorktown. KJ \ y 122 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Kv P a t r i o t s i n t h e F a m i l y o f J C G S M e m b e r B e t t y P a i n t e r F o r i Ky All of the photographs on this page are from the World War I I era. At the top left is CpL WUUam Clyde Painter, Betty Foti's father. At the top right is Betty's uncle, Roy Ashe, and at the bottom left, Fred Ashe, a great - uncle. The picture at bottom right shows ships at Utah Beach on the coast of France, one of the major sites of the D-Day invasion. Ky 123 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Betty Painter Foti family (cont'd) y Ky At the top left, Betty's Uncle OdeU Ashe, pictured with his wife Pat; at top right, Betty's Uncle York Painter and Uncle Roy StegaU (husband of Vera Ashe StegaU); these three were all in the United States Navy in World War II. At bottom left, a portrait of Betty's father-in-law, John Charles Foti (World War H, US Army); and at bottom right, Betty's husband, JCGS member Charles M. Foti, shown at reenUstment in 1971. (MSgt, USAF, 40th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Wing). KJ 124 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Ky P a t r i o t s i n t h e F a m i l y o f J C G S m e m b e r M a r y R h i n e h a r t S h o o k Ky At the top left, "Cotton Tom" Hooper, son of Clemmons and Mary PhiUips Hooper, a Confederate veteran who had been imprisoned at Camp Douglas, and great - great grandfather of Mary Shook. At the top right, Henry B. Plott, son of John and Louise Reeves Plott of Haywood County, who served as a Lieutenant in the North Carolina 29th, Company E, CSA, for the duration of the CivU War, and great - grandfather of Mary Shook. Ky Grady Clifton Shook, son of Luther and Hettie Jenkins Shook, was superintendent of the Shipbuilding Division of Savannah Machine and Foundry in Savannah, GA, when he went into the United States Army on his birthday December 14,1944. He took his basic training at Camp Joseph Robinson in Little Rock, AR, and from there was sent to Fort Mead, MD. From Fort Mead, the men were sent to California, where he was placed in the 65th Engineers Combat BattaUon and sent to Luzon in the PhiUppines. After a period of time in the PhiUppines, he was shipped to Japan just after the atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki He spent the rest of his service time at Nagoya, Japan. He returned home and was discharged at Fort Bragg January 21,1946. Grady Clifton Shook is the husband of Mary Rhinehart Shook. 125 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Mary Rhinehart Shook FamUy (cont'd) y Above, the sons of Mary Rhinehart Shook. At the left, Grady C. Shook, Jr. (Tony), who joined the United States Navy in 1958. He was assigned to sea duty the entire time of his enlistment With home port at Norfolk, he served three years aboard the USS Tidewater and one year aboard the WUUam Wood He was discharged in December 1962. He is married to Dawn Pless and Uves in Haywood County. At the right, WUUam R. Shook (BUI), who joined the Navy in 1961. He served two years aboard the USS Power, with home port in JacksonviUe, FL. He served as Signalman in the Caribbean and Mediterranean. He returned from active duty in 1963, and continued his service in the Naval Reserves until his discharge in 1966. His wife is Betty Nicholson Shook. Ky (Brown continuation from page 132) H.R. Brown was converted at Jhon's Creek, August 1877, and was baptised by B.N. Queen into the feUowship of the Baptist Church, in which he remained a faithful member until death. The fanuly moved to CuUowhee from Caney Fork and have been here for many years. On Tuesday February 5, 1929, at the age of 86 years, HR. Brown came to the termination of his eventual voyage. It had been long, useful, happy splendid! In the goodness of God he was permitted to Uve more than his aUotted three score and ten. Ripe in years and rich in wisdom, purified of much of the dross of this world, peaceful and content to finish, with a fuU competency of satisfaction, and a glad anticipation for his landing, he approached the bar. [Ed. The document concludes by quoting part of Tennyson's In Memoriam.] KJ 126 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Ky P a t r i o t s i n t h e F a m i l y o f J C G S M e m b e r M a r i e P o w e l l T r e a d w a y Ky An interesting group of photographs on this page: At the top left is a composite of the World War H sons of Harley and Flora Mathis PoweU. In this picture, at left is Worley PoweU, CpL US Army; in the center is Lyman PoweU, signalman 3/c US Navy (among medals, one for the invasion of Southern France) and at right is Harvey PoweU, CpL US Army, whose service included time in Italy, Germany, and France. The top right photograph is of Bob Woodard, father of the young men on the foUowing page, US Army, and who fought in North Africa and at Anzio, was wounded at Cassino. The bottom left picture is of Aaron Mathis, World War I, and a brother of Flora Mathis PoweU, Marie's mother. The bottom right picture is one of those huge (in this case 200) group pictures of entire companies. Worley PoweU is standing at the extreme right in the fourth row. Ky 127 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Marie Powell Treadway family (cont'd) Above, the sons of Marie PoweU Woodard Treadway. At left is Tony Woodard, USAF, in the center is Dale Woodard, US Army, and at right is Randy Woodard, who retired from the Air Force. AU entered service in the 1970's. Below left is a photo of Stanley PoweU, son of Lyman PoweU and nephew of Marie, and at right is the miUtary data from his official retirement ceremony in 1998. ^ KJ y Vhsxsa. •» ;?4«e*'TP«^rt><»MA«^3Eswa^^ y 128 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Ky S o m e E a r l y B u r i a l s o f V e t e r a n s i n J a c k s o n C o u n t y [Ed. The following lists were compiled from the Jackson County Cemetery Book and submitted by JCGS member Rnth Shuler. One interesting observation to make is that by its very nature, this list cannot be complete in the sense that all veterans will not have military designations, and many from the early wars will not have markers at all. For example, in Rum's family alone, two great - great grandfathers - George Norman at Norman Cemetery and P J . Crawford at Crawford Cemetery - have grave markers, but do not have the record of Civil War service there. Likewise, Ruth and husband Roy Shuler know that Roy's great - great grandfather Smith Mills served in the Mexican War, and they know he is buried in Love Cemetery, but he has no marker at all..] American Revolutionary War CuUowhee Baptist DiUs (Fisher Creek) Hyatt Old Love Chapel War of 1812 George Cunningham John Stiles Edward Hyatt Samuel Monteith Old Love Chapel Thomas S. Monteith CivU War (Confederate unless designated) Balsam Grove Bee Knob Big Ridge Brown-Wood Bumgarner (Wilmot) Cagle Campground ^ Conner (Dillsboro) (Lower) Coward Crawford CuUowhee Baptist DiUard Ethan AUen Cook Henry Messer John A. Gibson Henry M. Hooper (USA) R-E. Brown Floyd M. Wyatt E .H Cagle Stephen H. MUler Sevier S. Enloe WA. Mclaughlin Pendleton Hyde Samuel P. Conner WUUam J. Parker Coleman Bryson J. Wesley Shelton Wm. H. Thos. Dillard 129 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 East Fork East LaPorte Fairview Memorial Gardens Gibson Hamburg Hooper (Caney Fork) Hooper (Brasstown) Hooper - SpeedweU Keener Locust Field Love (Lovesfield) (Old) Love Chapel Lusk McDoweU Massingale Moody - Barker's Creek New Savannah Old Field Old Savannah Nathaniel Deitz Burdette Cowan Joshua K. HaU B.P. Davis George Bumgarner John B. Gibson James Edwin Moss Andy WUson Isom D. Franks EUga M. Coward George Marion Long Thomas H. Parker Thomas Hooper A.D. Hooper MontervUle P. Pressley Lt. Benj. H. Cathey Sgt. John S. Keener Clingman Cunningham J.T. Love Samuel M. FrizzeU Jeremiah Evans Lusk Rachel McDowell Bobby Massingale W.W. Jones Cpl. B.H. Jones WUUam M. Forster WUUam Cope Cpl. George W. Green 2Lt. C S . Buchanan Marcus L. DUls PhiUipDUls Solomon Sutton Ky y y 130 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 •Ky Old Savannah Parris Pine Creek Baptist Pleasant Grove Rock Bridge R&gers Sherrill Shuler (Lower) Stephens Stewart StiUweU Thomas Memorial Ky Ward (QuaUa) Webster Wesley Chapel Wesleyanna Whiteside Cove WUson Wood (Dark Ridge) Worley (Lower) Zachary Isaac M. Bradley Marcus Pangle Cpl. Manson WUson Joseph Green lLt. Elcana Ash Rufus M. Parris WUUam Stewart James H. Rochester John F. Shelton John H. Rigdon Thomas J. Stiles, John B. Raby WUUam Leeander Shuler Dolphas M. Stephens NJ. (only designation) Jim Watson WUUam Mack FrizzeU Capt. J.W. TerreU Andrew Jackson Patton Stephen J. Beck Samuel W. Cooper Thomas W. Ward Samuel M. Gibson Maj ."Nathaniel Price J.W. Terry (USA) Sidney Ashe CoL John HAUey Enos WUson M.B. Wood James S. Farley John B. AUison, WJR. Hooper (USA), Herbert M. Wike(USA) 131 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 H . R . B r o w n O b i t u a ry Ky [Ed. The following memorial appeared in a publication called the Cullowhee Yodel February 15,1929. This paper was the forerunner of The Western Carolinian, student newspaper for Western Carolina University. The obituary is being transcribed here exactly as it was. Submitted by JCGS member Bill Crawford.] H.R. Brown In Memoriam The long gray line of Jackson County's sons who foUowed Lee and Jackson And Johnson and Beauregard at the caU of duty in 1860 is rappidly being thinned. The past three months have witnessed the passing of six of these worthy sons Who wore the Gray. Truly it can be said of them: "How sleep the Brave who sink to rest By aU their Country's wishes blest!" Only a dozen now remain in Jackson County of the noble remnant who came out of the fire of heU and death from 1860 to 1865 and returned to their homes to rebuUd the South (New). The last one of these to lay down his armour and respond to the caU was H.R. Brown commonly caUed Hurriah Brown, and affectionately caUed "Uncle Hurriah." His life was a benediction. It was more: it was a song, the music of which wiU sweeten and hearten hundreds of his relatives and friends for years to come. Like many others of his day, he was never rich in material things, though providing at aU times for his large famUy, so that they always had plenty; he wealthy in the finer things of Ufe. He possed a wealth of the simple and homely virtues of frankness, hospitaUty, modesty and industry. To bis chUdren and children's chUdren he leaves an imortal legacy: a frankness at aU times, sympathy for those in need, loyalty to friends, devotion to truth, and consecration to the service of his feUowman and his God. What a legacy! How much richer life is, the world is, CuUowhee community is, because he lived and wrought! Ky Hurriah Brown was bom on John's Creek, Caney Fork, March 18, 1842. He entered the Confederate service at the age of 19, enUsting in Company F, September, 1861. He served throughout the war. In speaking of his four years of army Ufe, with aU its hardships and dangers, he spoke of it as a privelege and not hardship. He was a good soldier fighting not for money, not for glory; fighting at the caU of Duty. To him it was never a "Lost Cause,' but a glorious struggle gloriously fought. He did not lose: the South did not lose: because they had not faltered, but dared to defend Truth and Right, Home and Country. This is the South's heritage! In that contribution, H.R. Brown, the Soldier, the Patriot, had a part. How happy his chUdren should be for that! One year after the close of the War, H.R. Brown married Miss PameUa L. Bishop, and they two "struck oars together" on Life's eventual sea. Peace having returned to the land, these two embarked under a clear sky and on a serene ocean for a long and happy and peaceful voyage. Many bright faces came into the home to brighten their voyage. Nine chUdren in aU, seven of whom are stiU Uving. These are John J. Brown of Lakeland, Fla; Robt. O. Brown of CuUowhee; BasU M. Brown of Spruce Pine; Mack C. Brown of CuUowhee; EmUy Brown of CuUowhee; Jesse F. Brown and Mrs. L.A. Buchanan of Sylva. Two chUdren, WUUam and James, deceased, complete the fanuly circle, which in time was widened by the addition of 34 grandchildren and 15 great - grandchUdren. (continued on page 126) y 132 Journeys Through Jackson- July - August 2002 L > P a t r i o t s i n t h e F a m i l y o f J C G S M e m b e r L o u i s e B r o o k s S n y d e r -jr^^g^^ejift^*' fo? * ""'J'1' *'' 'll' " ^ - "MjiliJ""I ,'"fr ;. l.Wp'v'W^i'i} '.fill!:;.!iff SifSsw^P^ 'd *ft:jaf MS..; -'. . * 9k Ky Ky Walter Lee Brooks, father of Louise Brooks Snyder, was ready to embark for Europe when the armistice was signed in £918. At the top, we show a portion of his Discharge papers here, along with a picture of Brooks. The two photographs at the bottom show George Thomas Snyder, father of the young hero on the next page. George Thomas Snyder served in the 9th Infantry, Company E, during the Korean conflict He was decorated with several medals, including the Bronze b a r with 5 battle stars. 133 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 T h e S n y d e r F a m i l y . . . A S p e c i a l S a l u t e y . - '•'•• -A -T- •» fr-i »..II-"*.-.'. '•*«* 1**-: fKf- a!.&.• •• .... ^n . •.. ... - . 2 ^ Pfc Thomas W. Snyder Born 20 July 1949 in WaynesvUle, North CaroUna Pfc Snyder joined the United States Marine Corps and came to Vietnam in August, 1968. He served with Bravo Company, 1" Bn, 5th Marine Regiment until January 1969, when he volunteered to work with the Combined Action Group. He then attended C.A.P. school and joined CAP 3-1-5. Pfc Snyder worked with the Vietnamese Popular Force troops in Gia Le village, running patrols and ambushes, as weU as providing security for the local people. He was a team leader who was ready and willing to accept responsibility and was respected and weU Uked by aU. Through his own efforts Pfc Snyder learned the Vietnamese language and worked on Civic Action projects as weU as training the Popular Force Soldiers. Pfc Thomas W. Snyder was kUled in action at 2030, 16 April 1969, whUe conducting a night time ambush. [Ed. The above is quoted from the USMC memorial to Thomas Wayne Snyder. We are grateful, Louise, that you will allow JCGS to recognize and honor your son in these pages.] y 134 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Ky I n d e x f o r JTJ, V o l u m e X I I , N o s . 7 - 8 Ky Ky AUen 119 Alley 131 AUison 131 Ash 131 Ashe 123,124,131 Ashebranner 105 Baird 117 Baker 105 Baldwin 105 BaUow 105 Barnes 106 Beck 105,131 Bishop 121,-132 Borriesll9 Bradley 131 Bradshaw 106 Brannon 105 Brooks 133 Brown 106,126,129,132 Bryson 129 Buchanan 130,132 Bumgarner 130 Burch 104 Burchfield 105 Burks 105 Cagle 111, 129 Caps 105 Carlesenll9 Cathey 130 Clarke 105,106 Cockerham 104 Coker 105 Conner 129 Connerly 106 Constant 106 Cook 129 Cooper 115,131 Cope 130 Cottoner 105 Coulter 105 Cowan 130 Coward 130 Crawford 104,113,129,132 Cunningham 129,130 Davis 115,130 Deal 105 Dean 118 Deitz 130 Dement 105 DiUard 129 DUls 112,130 Douglas 105 Dudley 105 Eastis 105 Enloe 129 Ensley 117,118 Erwin 106 Evans 105,130 Farley 131 Fleming 105 Forster 130 Fortenberry 106 Foti 123,124 Franks 130 FrizzeU 103,104,105,117, 118,130,131 Fry 105 Gibbs 106 Gibson 129,130,131 GUbertl05 Gowinl06 Gray 105 Green 130,131 Grider 105 Griffinll5 HaU 130 Hampton 109 Harris 106 Hart 106 Hawes 105 Hawnl05 Hofshaw 105 Holt 105 Hood 109 Hooper 121,122,125,129, 130,131 Hoyle 122 Hudgins 119 Hudson 105 Husbands 105 Hyatt 106,129 Hyde 129 Icard 105 Inman 105 Isom 105 Jackson 111 James 106 Jeffers 106 Jenkins 125 Jennings 104 Johnson 105 Jones 108,130 Keener 130 KeUum105 Leatherwood 106 Lewis 106 Little 105 Long 130 Love 109,130 Low 105 Lusk 130 Martin 104,105,112 Massingale 130 Mathis 127 McClure 106 McCracking 106 McDoweU 130 McLaughlin 129 McLeroy 105 McMahan 112 McPeters 105 Medford 107 Messer 107,112,117,118, 129 MiUer 105,129 MUls 129 Mincey 119,120 Monteith 109,129 Morris 106 Morton 115 Moss 130 Murry 105 Nelson 106 Nicholson 126 Norman 104,129 Orr 105,106 Painter 123,124 Pangle 131 Parker 129,130 Parris 131 Patterson 105 Patton 131 Pearcy 105 Pearson 106 Pepper 105 PhiUps 105 PhUUps121,122,125 Pless 126 Plott 125 Poldoson 105 PoweU 105,127 Pressley 119,130 Price 131 135 Journeys Through Jackson July - August 2002 Queen 109 Raby 131 Rayborn 106 Reeves 125 Rhinehart 116,125 Rider 105 Rigdon 131 Robison 105 Rochester 131 Roseberry 106 Rynehart 105 Sally 105,106 Scatesll6 Sealy 106 Sharp 105 Shelton 129,131 Shinalt 105 Shook 116,125,126 Shuford 105 Ky Shuler 129,131 Simpson 105 Smith 105,106 Snyder 133,134 StegaU 124 Steray 105 Step 105 Stephens 131 Stewart 131 Stiles 129,131 Stoner 105 Stringfield 106 Summers 106 Summy 106 Suttlemire 105 Sutton 109,110,111,112, 130 Swift 116 TerreU 131 Terry 131 Thompson 106 Treadway 107 Turpin 107 Vewiggll9 ViUall6 Ward 131 Watson 131 Whitely 105 Whitson 105 Wike 131 Williams 106 Wilson 104,105,106,122, 130,131 Wood 108,131 Woodard 127,128 Wyatt 129 Young 105 y KJ 136