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Kezia Stradley Osborne to Roland C. Osborne, January 1, 1862

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  • In this New Year’s letter of 1862, Kezia Stradley Osborne wrote to her husband Roland C. Osborne describing problems at home and details involved in farming.
  • January 1, 1862 1862 Beaverdam New year’s day A New Years gift, My Dear. Well what shall it be. I would love to give you a new years kiss this bright morning, but I won’t so I will write you the very best letter that I can and send you my best wishes that this new year may be the happiest one of your life or least happier than the one just past May its closing day find you in your own quiet home surrounded by your dearest friends. May you be an orderly member of Christ’s Church and an honorable citizen of an Independent Southern Confederacy May happiness dwell in your house and peace in reign in your Country. If it is the will of God that you remain here, if it is not May your happy Spirit be at rest in our Father’s House, where there are many Mansions; in the New year’s prayer of your absent Wife. After waiting longer than I ever have had to do before for a letter from you I received two last night. I found that you have been disappointed too. I suppose there has been something wrong about the mails. And right here I promise you that I will always do the very best I can about writing. You must remember that I can’t always send to the Office at the right time. But be sure that I will not neglect to write on account of any thing being the matter. For if I can’t write myself I will get some one else to do it. You ask me to help you fix a plan to get a [crop started; substitute ?] I think it very important for it to be done and if I was stout again like I used to be and was back in our house and could get good hands to work and the ground to work and the tools to work with and some clever girl to stay with me I would try to have thing ready for you. You know I always told you that I could beat you farming any how but you see there are a good many ands and ifs in the way. I can not walk yet and I am afraid I will not walk this winter. Dr. Neil now [?] thinks I can not walk in c [?] 12 months but I hope to get well sooner than that. I think your Father has rented nearly all his land and your farming tools are scattered to the four winds. Uncle Joseph is not ready to leave the house yet and you know that I could not do any good unless I could get to myself you know your Father would not care for any thing I could say. I still hope that you will get off to see to these things your self and I will then do what ever your interest requires if it is in my power to do so you had better believe I would love to be trying to make something for the children I got a letter from Sis Line [?] last night they are well and have sent you some butter cakes and apples. I hope you have got them. I will write to them about your pants. Addie promised to have them done by Christmas. I have a poor chance to work but I will do any thing I can for you. Fine [?] says she wants me to take the baby back and Mattie [?] says if Fine [?] wants a baby she may have one of her own for she can’t share this big fat baby you [?] [she has had ?] so much trouble with him he is quite well this morning you ask me what a certain Lady means by signing her name so loving. I reckon she means what she says. If she does marry she will give a certain C.R. a most awful waking up. I think he has been dreaming this long time. By the way have you written C.R. [C.B. ?] if you have not I wish you would. I know it would go against your feelings to do so but you know we must forgive if we hope to be forgiven and he has been very kind to me since you left. I would not care if he knowed some things I hate to see him made a fool of but I guess he will find out some day. I am so glad that you have got to house keeping. Do up you [?] it any better than you did last winter, or would you as soon be back on the hill with the same old housekeeper. We would have a nice piece of furniture now I mean a cradle. Jo [?] is at home yet his health is very delicate. I am afraid he can’t stand the winter. His Col. don’t take one bit of care of his men. They give him a dreadful mean name they have been ordered to Kentucky but the men have been starved and dragged about until they are unable to go. Don’t be afraid of writing too much just wait till I grumble [?] I am much obliged to Billy Banham [Bonham ?] for his Kind wishes. I have often thought of him, that he would Be kind to you if you were sick. I have to hear how Any of the boys are doing you see I have filled up my Paper this time. I have just kissed Rufus for Papa he Is so sweet [?] I do want you to come and see him and kiss. Osborne Civil War letters Annotated versions prepared by George Frizzell
Object
  • In this New Year’s letter of 1862, Kezia Stradley Osborne wrote to her husband Roland C. Osborne describing problems at home and details involved in farming.
  • January 1, 1862 1862 Beaverdam New year’s day A New Years gift, My Dear. Well what shall it be. I would love to give you a new years kiss this bright morning, but I won’t so I will write you the very best letter that I can and send you my best wishes that this new year may be the happiest one of your life or least happier than the one just past May its closing day find you in your own quiet home surrounded by your dearest friends. May you be an orderly member of Christ’s Church and an honorable citizen of an Independent Southern Confederacy May happiness dwell in your house and peace in reign in your Country. If it is the will of God that you remain here, if it is not May your happy Spirit be at rest in our Father’s House, where there are many Mansions; in the New year’s prayer of your absent Wife. After waiting longer than I ever have had to do before for a letter from you I received two last night. I found that you have been disappointed too. I suppose there has been something wrong about the mails. And right here I promise you that I will always do the very best I can about writing. You must remember that I can’t always send to the Office at the right time. But be sure that I will not neglect to write on account of any thing being the matter. For if I can’t write myself I will get some one else to do it. You ask me to help you fix a plan to get a [crop started; substitute ?] I think it very important for it to be done and if I was stout again like I used to be and was back in our house and could get good hands to work and the ground to work and the tools to work with and some clever girl to stay with me I would try to have thing ready for you. You know I always told you that I could beat you farming any how but you see there are a good many ands and ifs in the way. I can not walk yet and I am afraid I will not walk this winter. Dr. Neil now [?] thinks I can not walk in c [?] 12 months but I hope to get well sooner than that. I think your Father has rented nearly all his land and your farming tools are scattered to the four winds. Uncle Joseph is not ready to leave the house yet and you know that I could not do any good unless I could get to myself you know your Father would not care for any thing I could say. I still hope that you will get off to see to these things your self and I will then do what ever your interest requires if it is in my power to do so you had better believe I would love to be trying to make something for the children I got a letter from Sis Line [?] last night they are well and have sent you some butter cakes and apples. I hope you have got them. I will write to them about your pants. Addie promised to have them done by Christmas. I have a poor chance to work but I will do any thing I can for you. Fine [?] says she wants me to take the baby back and Mattie [?] says if Fine [?] wants a baby she may have one of her own for she can’t share this big fat baby you [?] [she has had ?] so much trouble with him he is quite well this morning you ask me what a certain Lady means by signing her name so loving. I reckon she means what she says. If she does marry she will give a certain C.R. a most awful waking up. I think he has been dreaming this long time. By the way have you written C.R. [C.B. ?] if you have not I wish you would. I know it would go against your feelings to do so but you know we must forgive if we hope to be forgiven and he has been very kind to me since you left. I would not care if he knowed some things I hate to see him made a fool of but I guess he will find out some day. I am so glad that you have got to house keeping. Do up you [?] it any better than you did last winter, or would you as soon be back on the hill with the same old housekeeper. We would have a nice piece of furniture now I mean a cradle. Jo [?] is at home yet his health is very delicate. I am afraid he can’t stand the winter. His Col. don’t take one bit of care of his men. They give him a dreadful mean name they have been ordered to Kentucky but the men have been starved and dragged about until they are unable to go. Don’t be afraid of writing too much just wait till I grumble [?] I am much obliged to Billy Banham [Bonham ?] for his Kind wishes. I have often thought of him, that he would Be kind to you if you were sick. I have to hear how Any of the boys are doing you see I have filled up my Paper this time. I have just kissed Rufus for Papa he Is so sweet [?] I do want you to come and see him and kiss. Osborne Civil War letters Annotated versions prepared by George Frizzell