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Correspondence: Zebulon Weaver to Mrs. W. E. Comstock, September 4, 1933

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  • -3-3 I note from this correspondence that on ir 17, 1930 |owrote you as follows; (refer,ng to the McCampbell lands I "To locate them would require a greet deal of exaense, but the whole situation is such thtt I would be willing to consider some settlament with you for your interest, in order to clear the isttter v.j^» The most thct I have had the Perk Commission suggest to me tht*t they would be willing to ray would be two or three hundred dollars. Ton might write me about this right away." In reply to t/ia,WraWtrWe, under date of December 17, 1930, as foS^f^1^™*5 "I would le willing to settle with the Park wommission for |:1,000*00 for all my Interest in the Park area on the lorth Carolina side." Afterwards you filed your answer in the case and then followed a good deal of oorresponance reletive to a settlement. This settlement was finally entered" Into , as I recall, some time in April after you mm filed /our answer in January. My letters to you Indicate that the Park would probebiy bo willing to pay you as much as three hundred or four hundred dollars, but lstor Xr. P.hodes, in order toJt0k the claim behind him, ms.de an agreement with you for v800.00« He, of course, knows this was to cover all your interest in all of the McCaspbell grants. And, until recently I novar had the slightest intimation that you had any contention otherwise. I feel certain, as an attorney,that if you ted hs& to prove your claim you wo old never have gotten amy whera and any honest attorney, on the facts, I am sure would not hesitate to show you the difficulties to show sny title and would advise you that your deed was final ana full settlement of your Interest, I helped you in this cutter, as e friend, and really the x-ark went further with you than I ever thought they woald go, Pud, how, to hsve ■ further claim made against the Park, or me, is simply unthinkable, and I ©an see nothing: to disease in so fsr as this phase of any claim you may have is concerned. Our aorresTX>noenee, as I have said, is very clear and conclusive and indicates exsctly what was intended in the agreement which was finally rsachefi and upon which the deed was based.
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