Southern Appalachian Digital Collections

  • Western Carolina College (199)
  • Western Carolina Teachers College (239)
  • Western Carolina University (1774)
  • Allanstand Cottage Industries (0)
  • Appalachian National Park Association (0)
  • Bennett, Kelly, 1890-1974 (0)
  • Berry, Walter (0)
  • Brasstown Carvers (0)
  • Cain, Doreyl Ammons (0)
  • Carver, George Washington, 1864?-1943 (0)
  • Cathey, Joseph, 1803-1874 (0)
  • Champion Fibre Company (0)
  • Champion Paper and Fibre Company (0)
  • Cherokee Indian Fair Association (0)
  • Cherokee Language Program (0)
  • Crittenden, Lorraine (0)
  • Crowe, Amanda (0)
  • Edmonston, Thomas Benton, 1842-1907 (0)
  • Fromer, Irving Rhodes, 1913-1994 (0)
  • Garza, Amy Ammons (0)
  • George Butz (BFS 1907) (0)
  • Goodrich, Frances Louisa (0)
  • Grant, George Alexander, 1891-1964 (0)
  • Heard, Marian Gladys (0)
  • Kephart, Calvin, 1883-1969 (0)
  • Kephart, Horace, 1862-1931 (0)
  • Kephart, Laura, 1862-1954 (0)
  • Laney, Gideon Thomas, 1889-1976 (0)
  • Masa, George, 1881-1933 (0)
  • McElhinney, William Julian, 1896-1953 (0)
  • Niggli, Josephina, 1910-1983 (0)
  • North Carolina Park Commission (0)
  • Osborne, Kezia Stradley (0)
  • Owens, Samuel Robert, 1918-1995 (0)
  • Penland Weavers and Potters (0)
  • Rhodes, Judy (0)
  • Roberts, Vivienne (0)
  • Roth, Albert, 1890-1974 (0)
  • Schenck, Carl Alwin, 1868-1955 (0)
  • Sherrill's Photography Studio (0)
  • Smith, Edward Clark (0)
  • Southern Highland Handicraft Guild (0)
  • Southern Highlanders, Inc. (0)
  • Stalcup, Jesse Bryson (0)
  • Stearns, I. K. (0)
  • Thompson, James Edward, 1880-1976 (0)
  • United States. Indian Arts and Crafts Board (0)
  • USFS (0)
  • Vance, Zebulon Baird, 1830-1894 (0)
  • Weaver, Zebulon, 1872-1948 (0)
  • Western Carolina University. Mountain Heritage Center (0)
  • Whitman, Walt, 1819-1892 (0)
  • Wilburn, Hiram Coleman, 1880-1967 (0)
  • Williams, Isadora (0)
  • Jackson County (N.C.) (2265)
  • Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Asheville (N.C) (0)
  • Avery County (N.C.) (0)
  • Blount County (Tenn.) (0)
  • Buncombe County (N.C.) (0)
  • Cherokee County (N.C.) (0)
  • Clay County (N.C.) (0)
  • Graham County (N.C.) (0)
  • Great Smoky Mountains National Park (N.C. and Tenn.) (0)
  • Haywood County (N.C.) (0)
  • Henderson County (N.C.) (0)
  • Knox County (Tenn.) (0)
  • Knoxville (Tenn.) (0)
  • Lake Santeetlah (N.C.) (0)
  • Macon County (N.C.) (0)
  • Madison County (N.C.) (0)
  • McDowell County (N.C.) (0)
  • Mitchell County (N.C.) (0)
  • Polk County (N.C.) (0)
  • Qualla Boundary (0)
  • Rutherford County (N.C.) (0)
  • Swain County (N.C.) (0)
  • Transylvania County (N.C.) (0)
  • Watauga County (N.C.) (0)
  • Waynesville (N.C.) (0)
  • Yancey County (N.C.) (0)
  • Newsletters (510)
  • Publications (documents) (1755)
  • Albums (books) (0)
  • Artifacts (object Genre) (0)
  • Cards (information Artifacts) (0)
  • Clippings (information Artifacts) (0)
  • Crafts (art Genres) (0)
  • Drawings (visual Works) (0)
  • Envelopes (0)
  • Financial Records (0)
  • Fliers (printed Matter) (0)
  • Glass Plate Negatives (0)
  • Internegatives (0)
  • Land Surveys (0)
  • Letters (correspondence) (0)
  • Manuscripts (documents) (0)
  • Maps (documents) (0)
  • Memorandums (0)
  • Minutes (administrative Records) (0)
  • Negatives (photographs) (0)
  • Occupation Currency (0)
  • Paintings (visual Works) (0)
  • Photographs (0)
  • Postcards (0)
  • Programs (documents) (0)
  • Questionnaires (0)
  • Scrapbooks (0)
  • Sheet Music (0)
  • Slides (photographs) (0)
  • Sound Recordings (0)
  • Specimens (0)
  • Speeches (documents) (0)
  • Text Messages (0)
  • Tintypes (photographs) (0)
  • Transcripts (0)
  • Video Recordings (physical Artifacts) (0)
  • The Reporter, Western Carolina University (510)
  • WCU Students Newspapers Collection (1727)
  • A.L. Ensley Collection (0)
  • Appalachian Industrial School Records (0)
  • Appalachian National Park Association Records (0)
  • Axley-Meroney Collection (0)
  • Bayard Wootten Photograph Collection (0)
  • Bethel Rural Community Organization Collection (0)
  • Blumer Collection (0)
  • C.W. Slagle Collection (0)
  • Cataloochee History Project (0)
  • Cherokee Studies Collection (0)
  • Daisy Dame Photograph Album (0)
  • Daniel Boone VI Collection (0)
  • Doris Ulmann Photograph Collection (0)
  • Elizabeth H. Lasley Collection (0)
  • Elizabeth Woolworth Szold Fleharty Collection (0)
  • Frank Fry Collection (0)
  • George Masa Collection (0)
  • George Washington Carver and Slagle Family Collection (0)
  • Gideon Laney Collection (0)
  • Hazel Scarborough Collection (0)
  • Henry G. Hall Collection (0)
  • Hiram C. Wilburn Papers (0)
  • Historic Photographs Collection (0)
  • Horace Kephart Collection (0)
  • Humbard Collection (0)
  • Hunter and Weaver Families Collection (0)
  • I. D. Blumenthal Collection (0)
  • Isadora Williams Collection (0)
  • Jesse Bryson Stalcup Collection (0)
  • Jim Thompson Collection (0)
  • John B. Battle Collection (0)
  • John C. Campbell Folk School Records (0)
  • John Parris Collection (0)
  • Judaculla Rock project (0)
  • Kelly Bennett Collection (0)
  • Love Family Papers (0)
  • Major Wiley Parris Civil War Letters (0)
  • Map Collection (0)
  • Mountain Heritage Center Collection (0)
  • Norburn - Robertson - Thomson Families Collection (0)
  • Pauline Hood Collection (0)
  • Pre-Guild Collection (0)
  • Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual Collection (0)
  • R.A. Romanes Collection (0)
  • Rosser H. Taylor Collection (0)
  • Samuel Robert Owens Collection (0)
  • Sara Madison Collection (0)
  • Sherrill Studio Photo Collection (0)
  • Smoky Mountains Hiking Club Collection (0)
  • Southern Appalachian Archives (0)
  • Stories of Mountain Folk - Radio Programs (0)
  • Venoy and Elizabeth Reed Collection (0)
  • WCU Gender and Sexuality Oral History Project (0)
  • WCU Mountain Heritage Center Oral Histories (0)
  • Western North Carolina Tomorrow Black Oral History Project (0)
  • William Williams Stringfield Collection (0)
  • Zebulon Weaver Collection (0)
  • College student newspapers and periodicals -- North Carolina -- Cullowhee (1751)
  • African Americans (0)
  • Agriculture -- North Carolina, Western (0)
  • Appalachian dance (0)
  • Appalachian music (0)
  • Appalachian Region, Southern -- Maps (0)
  • Appalachian Trail (0)
  • Architecture (0)
  • Artisans -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Arts and crafts movement -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Basket making -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Canning and preserving (0)
  • Cherokee art -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Cherokee artists -- North Carolina (0)
  • Cherokee language (0)
  • Cherokee pottery -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Cherokee women -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Church buildings (0)
  • Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.) (0)
  • Dance -- Appalachian Region (0)
  • Depressions -- 1929 -- Southern States (0)
  • Education -- North Carolina, Western (0)
  • Floods -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Forced removal, 1813-1903 (0)
  • Forest conservation (0)
  • Forests and forestry (0)
  • Gay community -- North Carolina, Western (0)
  • Gender nonconformity (0)
  • Great Smoky Mountains National Park (N.C. and Tenn.) (0)
  • Handicraft -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Historic buildings -- North Carolina (0)
  • Hunting (0)
  • Landscape photography (0)
  • Logging (0)
  • Lumber trade (0)
  • Mines and mineral resources (0)
  • North Carolina -- Maps (0)
  • Oral history (0)
  • Paper industry (0)
  • Postcards (0)
  • Pottery (0)
  • Railroad trains (0)
  • Rural electrification -- North Carolina, Western (0)
  • School integration -- Southern States (0)
  • Segregation -- Southern States (0)
  • Slavery (0)
  • Sports (0)
  • Storytelling (0)
  • Tennessee -- Maps (0)
  • Tennessee Valley Authority (0)
  • Tourism -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Waterfalls -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Weaving -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • Wood-carving -- Appalachian Region, Southern (0)
  • World War, 1914-1918 (0)
  • World War, 1939-1945 (0)

Western Carolinian Volume 01 Number 03

  • wcu_publications-904.jp2
1 / 6
Item
  • Alumnae _L Send alL Subscription int. Western Carolinian WESTERN CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE CULLOWHEE, N. C, MARCH 15. 1933 Western Carolina Wins Tournament CIRL DEBATERS WIN; BOYS INVADE TENN. Western Carolina came through to the championship in the girls' division of the annual debate tournament of the North Carolina Intercollegiate Forensic Association, which was held at Salisbury March 9-11. This is Western Carolina's first year as a member of this organization. The Cullowhee debaters who made this outstanding achievement are: Miss Leana Hardin. Miss Imosrene Herron. Miss Kate Stillwell. and Miss Willa K. Johnson. Both the affirmative and negative teams sent from Western Carolina to the tournament won decisions over Lenoir-Rhyne and Catawba colleges. The negative team, which is composed of Miss Herron and Mies Hardin, later won a decision over William and Mary College of Virginia The boys sent from Cullowhee accomplished some fine things too. The negative boys' team that went to thn tournament from Cullowhee won de- L'lsiona over Catawba College and Charleston College of Charleston. South Carolina. Members of the alii imative boys' team that went to the Salisbury tournament are: TilsoO Fleetwood, and Wilson Lyday. Intercollegiate debates were held here on both Friday and Saturday 'nights. Friday night. March 24, a (Continued on Page 4.J MISS NEAL GIVES AN INTERVIEW ART TEACHER HAS INTERESTING CAREER Lena Caldwell. "There's nothing interesting about me," Miss Neal told your reporter when asked for an interview. "I can only give you bare facts that no one will enjoy." They ao not appear to be unenjoy- able and I disagree with Miss Neal about them being "just bare facta,'' At any rate here they are: (Continued on Page 4.) Dr. Hunter Will Speak At Rotary Convention Soon President H. T. Hunter of Western Carolina will respond to the addresses of welcome at the 'annual convention of the 58th District of Rotary, which will be held in Charleston, South Carolina April 2-4. Dr. Hunter is president of the Sylva Rotary Club. The 58th Rotary District comprises South Carolina and about half of the state of North Carolina. The addresses of welcome at the Charleston convention will be delivered by the mayor of the South Carolina e'ty nd the nre'ident of the Charleston Rotary Club. Canadian Poet To Speak Here Friday Night At Moore D. Wilson MacDonald. President of the Poetry Society of Canada and internationally known as the "Poet Laureate of Canada," will give a lecture- recital of his poetry in the Western Carolina Teachers College auditorium on Friday evening, March 31. He is •coming heie under the auspices of the college. While in North Carolina, the noted poet will give recitals at the University of North Carolina, North Carolina College for Women ,and Flo:a MacDonald College. • Mr. MacDonald is a musician, artist, 'and poet, but is most noted for his poetry. He has already had six volumes of p-oetry published. His public readings of his poetry are very effective and he is known far and wide as a great entertainer. Both children and grownups greatly enjoy his recitals. He is considered Canada's gieatest living poet. Mr. MacDonald has received high paise from both the Canadian and American press. The New York Times Rook Review says that he is the outstanding figure in the present generation of poets. The Toronto Saturday Sight says that he is perhaps the first elemental force in poet ■ y since Walt Whitman. The distinguished William Lyons Phelps of Yale University says that he is an original poet of distinction. Great interest is being expressed on the campus over the forthcoming visit of Mr. MacDonald to Cullowhee. His recital will be a rare treat indeed for the student body. Literary Club Accepts New Members Six persons are wearing the colors of the Literary Club as a result of their being selected as desirable members for that organization. The colors are silver, black and white. Sin e its organization in the spr'ng of 1932 the club has been composed ">nly of charter members, no new members having been admitted until now. The Literary Club is perhaps the most exclusive organization group on the campus and is very active in its work. The new candidates for membership are Dorothy Neal, Josephine Weaver, Carroll Sorrels, Kims Collins, Rachel R. Williams, and Clarence McCurry. They were formally accepted by the c^ib in an initiation progiam which was held on March 2 in the parlors of Moore Dormitory. The central theme of the Literary Club which held its regular meeting on Thursday evening, February 10, in the parlors of Moore Dormitory, was "Philosophy." The program consisted of discussions of the following topics: "What Philosophy Is;" "Why Philosonhy;" "Omar Khayyam;" and "Plato." For the first time since the organization began its work in the spring of 1933, the meeting was open to a few invited guests. Following the program the old members remained for a short business meeting. The Literary Club is one of the most influential organizations on the campus. The officers are Marshall Cooper, president; Violet Dillard, vice- president; and Emma Thompson, secretary-treasurer. NINTH ANNUAL HIGH SCHOOL TOURNAMENT VERY SUCCESSFUL Bethel Girls Win Cup For Fourth Successive Year. Issac Of Cherokee Voted Best Sportsman. The Western Carolina Cage Tournament for high schools proved to be a success although the Highway No. 100 from Sylva to Cullowhee was un- passable most of the time. This was the ninth annual touinumeni held on Western Carolina's court. , Thirty-three teams entered the tourney. Eighteen boys' teams and thirtteen girls' teams participated in the tournament. The following teams participated in ithe tournament: (boys) Almond, Bethel. Bryson City. Cherokee Indians, Cullowhee, Edney- ville, la'lf. Fines Creek, Hayesville. Highlands. Murphy, Robbinsville, (Continued on Page 1.) Schulbert Glee Club- Presents Operetta The Schubert Glee Club, under the ('.irection of Mrs. Charles Gulley, sponsored an operetta ."Chonita." a Gypsy romance in the college auditorium. Wednesday evening. March 8th. A large and ippr cia he audience of students, faculty members and friends witnessed the brilliant performance. The story portrays Gypsy life and the romance of a charming Gypsy- girl. Chonita. As a result of a prom- . a e to Chonita s dying mother, who was of the white race, Murdo de- c:des to send hi' daugh er t> visit her relatives Baron and Baroness Sten- . »CU. Ko ira I. a son of the Karon and Parones*.. falls in ove with her and follows her back to her tribe. S eph- an, her life-long playmate, had revealed his love for her before she left for her visit. Daya. Chonita's old nurse, reads from the stars that Konrad has a trip to Paris in store and he hurries back home. Step.ian wins the charming Choniti and peace a" I happinee- reign agr.in in the trile. Toe cast was as follows: Chonita, the heroine. Doris Brown. Stephan. the hero, Jack Hampton. Murdo. father of Chon ta. K rl Pryar. Daya, thi old mrse. Jessie Higdon. Konrad. son of Baron and Baroness and admirer 0' Choiiti. Kims Collins, Emil, th - the serva-t. Hall Cobb Chonita's fnv-iiite d-ncers were Betti- Ruth Autre Anre Barnrtt Louise Barnett '"a P t s. Rachel I. Williams and Est-r Champion. A number of b~ys = nd girls made up the Gyp y tribe. The costumes were very brilliant and u-'usu-llv pretty. Thev ad''ed i""ncn»»lv, ti the Gypsy snirit of tht "'i". The nefo'mance of the entire C««t was sp'erd'd. and the operetta, as f whoK is due much p"iis«. *s -e-ial features of the program. M'~« Ri-asvell gave a piano number and litt'e MJ«s Dorothv Cox ent"r. tm'ne^ between acts with some lovely solo dances. Mr. Adams and A. M. White, Jr. dan, for the i and choruses of the operetta- INCREASE IN ENROLLMENT IS EXPECTED FOR THE SPRING QUARTER LARGEST IN HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL Mnoday, March 20, 1933, is Registration Day for the Spring Quarter. From the number of inquiries which have been comming to the college office, indications are that there will be quite an increase in the enrollment tor the Spring Quarter. A second check-up on the enrollment to date this college year shows that there are 400 dirlierent students who have registered. For the Kail Quarter this year there were 347 as compared with 235 last year's Fall Quarter; the Winter Quarter this year shows 36(5 as compared with 247 of last year's Winter Quarter. Less duplications there has been the number of 400 registered this year to date. if the present rate of increase in enrollments for the Spring Quarter, the special six weeks term, and the summer school continues, the enrollment for the year should approximate (100. Reservations for rooms in Davies Hall by the young women indicate that this building will be occupied for the (list time this year by students. This means that the college will be taxed to its limit to take care of all those who will be in the dormitories. ,*,th me increase in enrollment in the special six weeks term, the college is expecting to make it possible for these students to enter the classes which have run since the beginning of the Spring Quarter and thereby be able to take care of the increase without additional instructors. Kiddie Orchestra Gives A Program The Toy Symphony Orchestra of the college training school gave a short concert in the auditorium here on Thursday afternoon, March 23. Tn« program was enjoyed by a large num- u.tv members, students, and community people. John S. Seymour, professor of Rural Sociology at the college, is director of the orchestra. He was assisted in preparing for this particular program uy Miss ^aciie Lou tsoutnerland, wn« teaches piano in the high and e eme.i- tary schools here. The toy orchestra has been organized this year by Mr, Seymour, who has unstintingly donated his time and money to the project. The orchestra has about thirty members ami has the symphonic arrangement. The enjoys hie program rendered on Thursday afternoon is as follows: niano solo. Carolyn Stillwell. Little Brown Jug. orchestra: tubephone solo. John Buchanan; piano solo, Miry Catherine Bryson; vocal solo. Eddie Brown; harmonica solo, J. R. Seymour; Casey Jones, string band: piano solo, Ann Bird; Row. Row, Row Your Boat, orchestra; dance?, Dorothy Cox, Woody Bishop, and Edwin Knight; novelty number, J. S. Seymour; and Nellie Gray, orchestra. Mr Sevmour is greitly interested (Continued on Page 4.)
Object