Southern Appalachian Digital Collections

Western Carolina University (20) View all
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Interview with Henry Lambert

Item
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Item’s are ‘child’ level descriptions to ‘parent’ objects, (e.g. one page of a whole book).

  • Henry Lambert, popularly known as "Chief Henry," talks about his work--posing as a Cherokee "chief" wearing Indian attire, including headdress, for tourists and vacationers visiting Cherokee, North Carolina. Lambert initially worked as a construction worker, but at the time of the interview Lambert had been working as "Chief" for a Smokies gift shop for nearly 47 years. According to him, he has been photographed with movie stars and even George Bush who had visited the area while he was running for presidency. He has received postcards and letters from all over the world. One of the best things Lambert liked about his job was that he could make kids happy. Lambert mentions he kept up with movies and kids' culture--Pocahontas and Lion King--so he could better interact with children. He also mentions his least favorite part was being criticized by tourists for a variety of reasons including the authenticity of his Cherokee attire, about what he ate, or that he was not a "real Indian." Some tourists were even surprised he could speak in English. Lambert's typical work day involves posing for photographs with tourists, holding doors open for ladies, being courteous with visitors, and shaking hands with kids. He also sells arrows, walking sticks, blow guns to the gift shop which then resells it. Although Lambert is now old, his regular customers still come year after year to take pictures with him.
Object
?

Object’s are ‘parent’ level descriptions to ‘children’ items, (e.g. a book with pages).

  • Henry Lambert, popularly known as "Chief Henry," talks about his work--posing as a Cherokee "chief" wearing Indian attire, including headdress, for tourists and vacationers visiting Cherokee, North Carolina. Lambert initially worked as a construction worker, but at the time of the interview Lambert had been working as "Chief" for a Smokies gift shop for nearly 47 years. According to him, he has been photographed with movie stars and even George Bush who had visited the area while he was running for presidency. He has received postcards and letters from all over the world. One of the best things Lambert liked about his job was that he could make kids happy. Lambert mentions he kept up with movies and kids' culture--Pocahontas and Lion King--so he could better interact with children. He also mentions his least favorite part was being criticized by tourists for a variety of reasons including the authenticity of his Cherokee attire, about what he ate, or that he was not a "real Indian." Some tourists were even surprised he could speak in English. Lambert's typical work day involves posing for photographs with tourists, holding doors open for ladies, being courteous with visitors, and shaking hands with kids. He also sells arrows, walking sticks, blow guns to the gift shop which then resells it. Although Lambert is now old, his regular customers still come year after year to take pictures with him.