Southern Appalachian Digital Collections

John C. Campbell Folk School, no. 23 (October 1939)

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Item
  • John C. Campbell Folk School published a series of newsletters from 1926 to 1950. Written like a letter from the school's director, the newsletter is a source of information about the classes and activities at the Folk School and their impact on the surrounding community. The Folk School is reported to be 56.5 percent self-supporting through the working farm and Folk School cooperatives. However the school must still be dependent upon outside support to continue to exist. The Southeast is reported by the government to have the lowest per capita income of the United States. The Folk School aims to remedy the problems in the mountains by providing inspiration and hope, as well as vocational work. Financial support from outside the mountains is imperative for the growing number of students to benefit from the Folk School.
Object
  • John C. Campbell Folk School published a series of newsletters from 1926 to 1950. Written like a letter from the school's director, the newsletter is a source of information about the classes and activities at the Folk School and their impact on the surrounding community. The Folk School is reported to be 56.5 percent self-supporting through the working farm and Folk School cooperatives. However the school must still be dependent upon outside support to continue to exist. The Southeast is reported by the government to have the lowest per capita income of the United States. The Folk School aims to remedy the problems in the mountains by providing inspiration and hope, as well as vocational work. Financial support from outside the mountains is imperative for the growing number of students to benefit from the Folk School.