Southern Appalachian Digital Collections

Western Carolina University (21) View all

John C. Campbell Folk School, no. 18 (November 1935)

Item
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Item’s are ‘child’ level descriptions to ‘parent’ objects, (e.g. one page of a whole book).

  • John C. Campbell Folk School published a series of newsletters from 1926 to 1950. Written like a letter from the school's director, the newsletter is a source of information about the classes and activities at the Folk School and their impact on the surrounding community. This issue serves as a memorial to Lucius "Uncle Luce" Scroggs, who passed away in the spring. Lucius Scroggs and his wife, Lillie, gave 25 acres of land on which the Folk School begun. Called "the host of our community", Lucius was a firm supporter of the Folk School's principles and development. He was also very interested and involved with the Log Museum, built by the community in 1926 to function as a means of preserving the history of the mountains from pioneer times. As one of the oldest community members, Lucius could remember from his childhood a different way of life. In his honor, the Men's and Women's Clubs devoted a day's work to the Log Museum, planting trees outside and doing repair work. Fred O. Scroggs, Lucius' son and Brasstown's general store owner, had great interest in and a keen knowledge of Indian relics, which led to local history discussions and the formation of a local mineralogy society. Local family history was important to Mrs. Campbell, made evident by her exhaustive research in local genealogy, which produced family trees for the majority of the community. Says the newsletter, "The winter course never passes that we do not take up with our students the origin of their names as far as these can be traced."
Object
?

Object’s are ‘parent’ level descriptions to ‘children’ items, (e.g. a book with pages).

  • John C. Campbell Folk School published a series of newsletters from 1926 to 1950. Written like a letter from the school's director, the newsletter is a source of information about the classes and activities at the Folk School and their impact on the surrounding community. This issue serves as a memorial to Lucius "Uncle Luce" Scroggs, who passed away in the spring. Lucius Scroggs and his wife, Lillie, gave 25 acres of land on which the Folk School begun. Called "the host of our community", Lucius was a firm supporter of the Folk School's principles and development. He was also very interested and involved with the Log Museum, built by the community in 1926 to function as a means of preserving the history of the mountains from pioneer times. As one of the oldest community members, Lucius could remember from his childhood a different way of life. In his honor, the Men's and Women's Clubs devoted a day's work to the Log Museum, planting trees outside and doing repair work. Fred O. Scroggs, Lucius' son and Brasstown's general store owner, had great interest in and a keen knowledge of Indian relics, which led to local history discussions and the formation of a local mineralogy society. Local family history was important to Mrs. Campbell, made evident by her exhaustive research in local genealogy, which produced family trees for the majority of the community. Says the newsletter, "The winter course never passes that we do not take up with our students the origin of their names as far as these can be traced."