Southern Appalachian Digital Collections

Western Carolina University (20) View all

John C. Campbell Folk School, no. 13 (April 1932)

Item
?

Item’s are ‘child’ level descriptions to ‘parent’ objects, (e.g. one page of a whole book).

  • John C. Campbell Folk School published a series of newsletters from 1926 to 1950. Written like a letter from the school's director, the newsletter is a source of information about the classes and activities at the Folk School and their impact on the surrounding community. In this issue, the fundamentals of the Danish folk school are reviewed, and how they prove to be a successful method of teaching in Appalachia. The typical Folk School student is defined as a young person who has dropped out of the traditional school system, yet recognizes an innate desire to continually learn. Student feedback is included regarding most interesting and beneficial courses, namely "singing games, shop work, carving, agriculture, sewing, cooking, and weaving." The newsletter concludes with the news about local cooperatives enabling the community to financially hold their own. Included are photographs of woodcarving and the Mountain Valley Creamery.
Object
?

Object’s are ‘parent’ level descriptions to ‘children’ items, (e.g. a book with pages).

  • John C. Campbell Folk School published a series of newsletters from 1926 to 1950. Written like a letter from the school's director, the newsletter is a source of information about the classes and activities at the Folk School and their impact on the surrounding community. In this issue, the fundamentals of the Danish folk school are reviewed, and how they prove to be a successful method of teaching in Appalachia. The typical Folk School student is defined as a young person who has dropped out of the traditional school system, yet recognizes an innate desire to continually learn. Student feedback is included regarding most interesting and beneficial courses, namely "singing games, shop work, carving, agriculture, sewing, cooking, and weaving." The newsletter concludes with the news about local cooperatives enabling the community to financially hold their own. Included are photographs of woodcarving and the Mountain Valley Creamery.