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Western Carolinian Volume 02 Number 06

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  • THE BOOST THE TOURNAMENT Western Carolinian WESTERN CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE BOOST THE TOURNAMENT Vol. H. CULLOWHEE, N. C, MARCH 1, 1934 WHO'S WHO AND WHY AT W.C.T.C. JOHN CALFEE (We are indebted to the Pen- dragon, local high school paper, for the following article, which was written by Jane Hunter) : There has been noticed a tall, lanky, grinning creature roaming around our campus all year. His comings and goings have been watched with some interest, but nothing definite has been known about the man. On September the ninth, many moons ago (he wouldn't say how many), in Berea, Ky., little Johnny Calfee first saw the light of day. His family moved to Asheville in 1916. He went to school at Asheville High, attended Park College in Kansas City, Missouri, and went from there to the University. He taught for two summers in the Asheville Summer School. And then life really began for him—he came to teach at Cullowhee. He is now teaching math and science and coaching basketball at Cullowhee High. . Now, having done with his life history, everybody gather round while I tell you some of the inside facts of his lurid career. First of all, as consolation to all whom it may concern, Mr. Calfee is neither married nor engaged—yet. However, when I very glibly asked him his opinion of girls, he sank down deeper in his chair, gazed tenderly out the window and softly murmured, "Blond and good - looking." After taking down this surprising bit of information, I finally called him back to terra firma and got down to business again. Now, for a few inside facts concerning this bold, bad boy from Ashcvillc. He engages in the vices ot bridge, dancing, and golf. (I'd like to tell you his hobby, but I know it would be censored.) He goes to bed when he's tired, and doesn't have any nicknames. It is surprising to note that he is still very fond of watermelon and icecream, by which we know that he has not yet put away childish thi And he never cleans up his room? Every time someone opens the door to his room, something falls out into the hall. LENA CALDWELL Lena Denise Caldwell, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Caldwell, Jr., was born in the industrial town of Belmont in 1914. She is the oldest of four children and proudly proclaims the fact that she has never been accused of being the baby of the family. She was always a good girl, because her father was a policeman. (She has a gambling spirit, however.) She graduated from Belmont High School in 1931, serving as editor-in- chief of her high school annual. At Western Carolina she has made a brilliant record in scholastic and extra-curricular activities. She is member of the Alpha Phi Sigma, se retary of the Student Senate, and managing editor of The Western Carolinian. Lena harbors a strong dislike f( anything purple, and hates white flowers, cake and pie. She claims she- hates routine, but she lives in one constantly. She can't remember to tie her left shoestring, and seldom members to polish her shoes. If you would win her favor in anything, jus.t feed her apples. She can eat a gallon in two days. She reads much poetry, Shelley being her favorite, but can't tolerate mystery stories. On the cinema screen, Frederic March, Dou^ Fairbanks, Jr., and Mickey Mouse attract her. "Impossible is a word found in the dictionary of fools," Napoleon's motto, and is Lena's also, for the Little General and Robert E. Lee are her ideals. She told me that: "If there is anything in me worthy of c mendation and if I ever achieve porton of success, I give the credit to a high school professor who taught me this, 'it's good to win, but it's just as good to lose and have the courage to pick up the ends and start over.' '' Lena is determined to be a juvenile or divorce lawyer. Since she has always been known to achieve that which she sets out for, you can assured that in a few years there will be a sign out in Reno bearing this inscription: Lena Denise Caldwell, L.L. D. The Erosophian Literary Society The Erosophian Literary Society met Saturday evening at 7 o'clock in the Erosophian Hall. A very interesting program was given. The Columbian Literary Society were guests of the Erosophians, since they answered the Erosophian challenge to debate. The program was as follows: Devotional—Miss Flora Morrison. Piano Solo—Miss Alberta Ivey. Debate: "Resolved that all women should wear their dresses at least three inches above their knees." Affirmative — Erosophians: Elizabeth West, Howard Summers. Negative — Columbians: Ottis Freeman, Ralph Goforth. The debate was won by the Columbians by a 3-0 decision. The judges included Miss Morrison, Mr. Retting, and David Stillwell. Homes Jackson gave an impromptu speech on "The effects of the N. R. A. on the Wages of Sin." Mr. Wilson Lyday spoke on "How to increase interest in Societies at W. C. T. C." An impromptu quartet, composed of Mr. Retting, Mr. Summers, Mr. Jackson, and Mr. Almond, rendered "Swing Low Sweet Chariot or Sum- pin'." A short business session was held by the Society after the visitors had been excused. The program was of an impromptu nature and was enjoyed by all. Let's all back our Societies for after all they are for our benefit. Are you backing your Society, Erosophians? —Paul Lyday. OUR ALUMNI Mr. Wiley Long ('08) holds an important position with the Ford Plant in Jacksonville, Fla. Mr. Long has been living in Florida for reral years. Mr. G. C. Davis ('09), prominent Waynesville attorney, has just announced that he will be a candidate le next election for Judge of the Superior Court of the twelfth judicial district. Judge Felix E. Alley (1896) holds the office at the present time. Mrs. Lillian Shipp Saunders ('13) writes us from White Springs, Florida, that she is planning to enter the University of Florida soon to work toward the B. A. degree. Mr. and Mrs. Homer Wike East La Porte have announced the arrival of twin sons. Mr. Wike is a graduate of the Class of 1923. Mrs. Wike is also a former student of the college. Mrs. Annie Zachary Gunnels ('24) is principal of the elementary school at East La Porte, N. C. Mrs. Maude Hopkins Moss ('25) since her marriage has been living in Cherryville, N. C. Mrs. Moss has not been teaching for several years. Mrs. Kate Paris Bryson ('27) is teaching in the elementary school at Glenville, N. C. Miss Helen Smathers ('27) teaching in the Clyde Elementary School. Miss Smathers has been located there for the past nine years. Mr. Horace Garrison ('21) has volunteered to do field work in Clay County far the Alumni Association toward soliciting funds for the Madison Memorial. Miss Amy Henderson ('31) is teaching the elementary school at Wilson, N. C. Miss Katherine Robinson ('31) is teaching second grade in the Pennsylvania Avenue School at Canton, N. C. Miss Robinson is a member of the first degree graduating class. Mr. William Hugh Bryson ('31), who is also one of our first degree graduates, is principal of the school at High Shoals, N. C. This is Mr. Bryson's second year there. Mr. James Osborne ('32) is teaching in the elementary school at Elizabeth City, N. C. Mr. Osborne has been located in Elizabeth City for the past three years. Miss Eulalia McClure ('32), who lives at Alexis, N. C, writes that she plans to visit the campus soon. Miss McClure is not teaching. Mr. William G. Crawford ('33) is teaching at Ellijay, N. C. Mr. Crawford is chairman of the Macon County Chapter of the Alumni As- Sutton Makes Bid For All-Star Berth Alvin Sutton, a sophomore guard of the Catamount Cagers, is making a serious bid for the All-North State Conference, or "Little Eight," cage selection for this season. Much of the credit due the Catamounts for their excellent record so far this season should really fall upon the shoulders of this blond boy, known by nickname as "Blackberry," who is not only a fine defensive star, but a scorer as well. Coaches and officials throughout the state have praised Sutton for his work in games to date. Bunn Hackney, former Tar Heel flash, and now a prominent cage referee, said recently that Sutton was one of the bright stars in the conference. His greatest asset, according to all the dope, is consistency. He's not "hot" one night and "cold" the next. His play at all times has been steady. Culler, the conference's high scorer, was held to two points by Sutton two weeks ago on the High Point floor—the smallest score the leader has ever made in cage competition. And last week, when the Cats played the Panthers again, Culler made a total of 13 points, five on foul shots, while Sutton was gathering six field baskets. Sutton takes the game of basketball seriously. He wants to do even better than he is now. He is a former Sylva Collegiate Institute and Sylva High star player. His play this season has been so unusual that he has attracted. attention throughout the conference as a star player. OPERETTA TO BE STAGED MARCH 20 "Peggy and the Pirate," a very clever operetta by Geoffrey Morgan and Geoffrey O'Hara, will be staged at the auditorium on Tuesday evening, March twentieth. The production will be an outstanding one of the year for it is under the capable direction of Miss Edgeworth, Miss Benton and Mr. Potter. The theme, of course, is love, and you wtill observe the art of love making by Mildred Painter, Howard Wilkie, Mary Alice Potter, Winfield Miller, Carolyn Weaver, David H. Brown, Mary Louise Gillespie, Homes Jackson, Porter Raper and Darrell Mitchell. This cast will also present the opera in Sylva. Mrs. Lois Owings Frady ('29) is living in Laurens, South Carolina, and is working for the Laurens County Relief Administration. Miss Blanche Anne Ledford ('30) is teaching music in the public schools at Belmont, N. C. Miss Sarah Hicks Hines ('33) is teaching first grade in the elementary school at Franklin, N. C. Miss Lois Copeland ('31) is teaching in the Cary Elementary School, Cary, N. C. YOUNG HARRIS PRESIDENT ADDRESSES STUDENT BODY President Lance of Young Harris College spoke to a very enthusiastic group at chapel recently. In his inspiring talk he discussed major educational fallacies. He related to us a few of the benefits derived from a college education. It is indeed an inestimable privilege to hear the leaders in the various fields impart to us many truths. The College Farm Western Carolina Teachers College owns and operates one of the best small farms in Western North Carolina. It embraces that section Cullowhee known as The Old Town House Field. There are about sixty acres in all and it is divided ito three sections. There are approximately forty-two acres under cultivation, fifteen acres given to pasture and about three acres devoted to woodland. The gross receipts for last year were approximately seven thousand dollars, one half of which was realized from milk. The remainder was realized from vegetables. A truck section is maintained from which much food is provided for the college. A canning plant had been maintained until last fall. The old plant has been taken down and a new steam plant will replace it before the canning season opens this year. Such products as apples, tomatoes, berries, beets, turnip greens, beans and sauer kraut are preserved in this manner for use of the college. A dairy herd of pure bred Guernsey and mixed stock is maintained. At present the herd contains about twenty-five head. The farm furnishes employment for four students working part time. These boys work under the farm director, Mr. L. A. Ammon, who has done much to bring the farm up to its present grade. Mr. Ammon is also an instructor in the college. Valentine Party Held Dan Cupid Active The annual Valentine party given by the Moore House Government Association for the students and faculty of W. C. T. C. was held Wednesday night, February 14, and was a tremendous success. Miss Leona Hardin, President of Moore House Association, presided. An entertaining program, followed by a recreation period, was enjoyed. Refreshments, consisting of ice cream and cake in Valentine colors, were served. The spacious parlors were attractively decorated to carry out the holiday gaiety. This phase of the entertainment was worked out by a committee composed of Peg Neal, chairman, Sue Sinclair and Anne Barnett. Guests were met at the door by Miss Maude Keener, Edna Henderson, Geralda Turnage. The pro- grain was rendered under the direction of another committee consisting of Jessie Higdon, chairman, Louise Killian, Mildred Kooiman, Margaret Perry. Those in charge of the games were Josephine Weaver, chairman, Rachael I. Williams, Lena Caldwell, Ruth Burch. The refreshments were planned and served by a group of which Alice Tort served as chairman with Frances Leatherwood, Edna Patton, Bobbie Rogers, and Margaret Slagle. Invitations to the party were sent out by a committee composed of Louise Gillespie, who acted as chairman, Ruth Brown, Rachael R. Williams. To the melodious notes of "Home, Sweet Home" the guests made a reluctant departure. STUNT NIGHT IS COMING EVENT The classes are soon to compete for great honors in the stunt night performance which will be held on March twenty-ninth in the audi- .im. A prize will be awarded r competent judges discern the winner. Attics arc being carefully 'nspected to find ancient costumes and practice is being duly performed to make this stunt night a long remembered event in college life. The Freshman committee is rnestly at work with Ruth Ballance rving as chairman and Hattie Siler reeman, Carolyn Weaver, Randall Duckett, and Gordon Reno assisting. Lena Caldwell is chairman of the Sophomore stunt committee. Rachel I. Williams, Margaret Perry, Marshall Watterson and Porter Raper assume the duties of the Junior class stunt committee. Mildred Kooiman, Margaret Ash- ton and James Crawford arc planning the stunt which the Seniors hope to stage. IM PORTANT AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION The Senate received the following petition: "We, the undersigned, believing in equal privileges to all, do hereby petition the Senate that they put in motion the necessary machinery whereby parts of Article V of the Student Body Constitution (May Festival) be amended so as to give the men students of W. C. T. C. the privilege of voting for the May Queen." The Senate acted upon it in the proper manner as stated in Article VI of the Constitution. Amendment, Article I All students in the college shall take part in the election of the May Queen. Special six weeks' term students are not eligible to vote. Explanation: In Section 3 of Article V the sentence, "Each woman student shall designate on a ballot her choice for the May Queen," is changed to "Each student shall designate on a ballot his or her choice for the May Queen."
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