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Western Carolinian April 23, 1941

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  • WELCOME SIXWEEKS STUDENTS! The Campus Interpreter The Campus Guide The Western Carolinian CULLOWHEE—A JEWEL IN THE HEART OF THE GREAT SMOKIES CULLOWHEE, N. C, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1941 PUBLISHED BY THE STL'DENT ASSOCIATION May Day Festival Will Be Held Friday Six Weeks Term For Active Teachers Began On Monday With the arrival on the campus of dozens of new faces, the special six weeks of the spring term began Monday, April 28. Many of the new students are familiar to the student body, having attended previous sessions. Others are new to the present students but they know the campus of other days. No figures are yet av ilable as to the number of nev si Santa at the time of going 'o press A rough estimation reveals th*.' there are more registered than the officials had anticipated. It was thought by Dean Bird that there would be no special session this spring, but requests became so numerous that it was necessary to form one at the last moment. According to Information from Dean Bird's office, this will probably be the last of its kind. Dancing Teachers Present Program In Chapel April 17 Miss Emily Geann Byram and ^Mr. Anthony H. Fell, instructors at the Arthur Murray School of Dancing in Asheville appeared in chapel here April 17. Mr. Fell discussed dance etiquette and position, and explained the characteristics of some popular steps. He and Miss Byram danced the fox trot, the American rhumba and conga and a version of jitterbugglng broken into basic steps for teaching. The program was enthusiastically received by the large audience. Both performers are well- known dancers. Miss Byram has taught in the Arthur Murray Schools throughout the nation for four years. She has won several prizes for her dancing, and was recently featured In "Dig- It", a dance from Fred Astalre's recent picture, "Second Chorus", in various theatres in this country. Mr. Fell recently returned from Cuba, where he brushed up on his rhumba and conga. While there he danced in Havana's Nacional Casino. Mr. Fell announced plans for a ten weeks dancing course in Sylva, with classes one night each week. James Cannon is acting with him in this. He also expressed hopes for a class here, but Miss Benton, head of the Physical Education Department, doubts its practicability in the near future, with credit courses in both social and folk dancing being offered by the college. Dean's List For Winter Quarter has Been Announced Twelve students were approved for the Dean's List and five for honorable mention at the end of the Winter Quarter, according to an announcement made in chapel Tuesday. This is the highest honor the college confers. To qualfy for the Dean's List, a student must make either the Alpha or Beta honor roll, make above average according t0 the national forms on the Cooperative General Culture Tests given In standard four-year colleges and universities, meet certain high standards of morality, personality, citizenship, and receive at least a "B" rating in one or more of the campus organizations. The general opinion of the student body and faculty Is sounded out and considered a factor In passing upon the qualifications that are subjective. The final test in case of ties is "which of these students would best represent the college off the campus." Selection of the membership for the Dean's List is made by a joint student-faculty committee and cannot include more than three per cent of the student body. Those who have been selected are: Mary Kathryn Gardner, Pauline Pressley, Bill Troutman, Tom Allison, Ray Cowan, Charles McCall, J. Richard Hughes, Lucille Reed, John Wikle, Ruth Cherry, Mary Delle Davis, Elmer Stahlam. Those who made Honorable Mention are: Ruth Hay- nle, Blllle Williams, Anne Bird, Ruth Ray, Lee Miller. President Hunter Chosen District Head Of Rotary Dr. H. T. Hunter, president of Western Carolina Teachers College, was unanimously nominated governor of the 190th district, Rotary International, at the Convention In Camden, South Carolina, April 21. Other people from Cullowhee attending the meeting were Mrs. H. T. Hunter, Mr. and Mrs. A. K. Hinds, and Mr. C. F. Dodson. Nineteen Rotarlans and Rotary- Annes representing the Sylva club, of which Dr. Hunter is a former head, also attended the convention. Approximately 600 people from clubs all over the district heard Dr. James C. Kinard, president of Newberry College, speak on "Community Service" In the morning session. Frank Hamblen, president of the Greenville, South Carolina, Club; also spoke on "Fellowship in Rotary." Jeff H. Williams, Chickasha, Oklahoma, director of the international organization, was speaker at the luncheon. Carrol H. Jones, of Columbia, a former governor, presided. Edmund H. Hardin, of Washington, D. C, a former district governor, was the principal speaker of the banquet held Monday night. The governor's ball immediately followc-l the banquet. Entertainment features on the day's program Included a golf tournament In which Mr. Dodson won the low score trophy, a gymkhana which included a pol0 game with Rotarians riding mules, and a garden party given especially for the entertainment of the Rotary-Annes, wives of the Rotarians. Candidates Selected For "Best Citizen" W. C. T. C. Students Are Heard On Radio Program Music from the production, "Weep No More My Lady", presented on the campus last quarter, made up the "Western North Carolina Schools in Review" radio program over W. Vr\ N. C. last Sunday evening irom 6:45 to 7:15. Joe Crowell, Gertrude Carter, Jean Whisnant, John Jordon, Jean Bennett, Charles Frazier, Walker Freel, Lucille Meredith, Edyth Cherry, Joy Juniper and Elizabeth Roger sang solo or duet parts. The recording was made on the stage of Hoey Auditorium by Hans Hanson and Joe Lance. Mrs. Charles Gulley conducted; Dorothy Thompson accompanied at the piano; Mrs. C. D. Kil- lian was narrator. Charles McCall, John Henry Gesser, Betty Penland, and Mary Delle Davis were nominated by the student body as candidates for the Best Citizen last week at a chapel period. These candidates, together with two boys and two girls, selected by the faculty will be judged on an accepted system of points by joint student-faculty committee composed of two students and two teachers. One girl and one boy will be selected, each of whom will receive a placque with the college seal and a name plate, designating the honor and the date of the school year. Lucille Reynolds and Elmer Stahlman were elected as the students to serve on the Best Citizens Comjmittee. Mr. John Seymour and Miss Mabel Tyree have been appointed as the two faculty members on the committee. Closest Election In School's History Held Last Week Evidence that less than two- thirds of the student body voted in the annual senatorial and publications election last Wednesday added spice to the closest election in the history of the college. The polls remained open from eight in the morning until two-thirty in the afternoon, giving ample time for the entire student body to cast their respective ballots. Fair weather prevailed throughout the day, giving way to showers late In the afternoon when the tabulation of votes was completed. Small groups gathered around the entrance of the senate chamber, anxiously awaiting news of the outcome. Leading in the numerical count of the senior class candidates for senator was Johnny Wilson, with 205 votes. The next highest was John Jordon who polled 180 votes. Frankie Collins followed John Jordon with 154, leading Carlton Wells by one vote,.Wells tailing with 153 ballots. Frank Proffit fell below the lowest winner by only one vote, having 152 cast in his favor. Charles Frazier with 163 votes, Bill Hardy with 202, and Jack Roberts with 211 made up the ing group in 'he rising Junior list. Roberts and Wilson, the two candidates polling highest number of votes In the Junior and Senior classes will compete in a run-off election for president of the student body within fifteen days after the election of senators. Neil Scott, freshman nominee led the entire list of candidates with 214 votes, but because he is a freshman, is not eligible for Student President. The other successful nominee of the freshman class was Paul Sutton, who triumphed over his closest opponent 143-128. A neck to neck race for Editor-in-Chief of the "Catamount" resulted in a lead of only one vote for Charles Guy Reid, who polled 157 votes over Mary Alice Feaster who received 156 ballots. This is the first time in the history of this publication that the editorship was decided by a bare plurality. This however, is evidence that both candidates must have been good. Bagging a second major office for the day, Johnny Wilson Dr. Willis Parker Delivers Address In College Chapel Dr. Willis A. Parker, director of the extension department of Western Carolina Teachers College and an able student of world affairs, delivered an address in the college chapel last Thursday afternoon on the subject "If Britain Falls." His purpose being to urge the people of this country to support whole-heartedly the tardily begun but rapidly-advancing movement to aid Britain, he vividly painted the dark picture of the possible effect on the western hemisphere of a Hitler- controlled Europe, a Europe whose history is moving so rapidly that any address prepared three days ago is out of date. The lecture indicated that, aside from the danger to our actual existence as an individual nation, such a condition would necessitate our competing economically with the low standards of living that would exist in Europe. This competition would Inevitably lower our living standards to a level with those of Europe, a condition that, to American people would be worse than death. According to Dr. Parker, It behooves the United States to save her economic system, If not her actual life, by rushing aid with all possible speed t0 Britain, the champion of freedom and the hope of a civilized world. Queen's Coronation And Maypole Dance Feature Program W. C. T. C. Band Presents Program At Webster Annual This Year Is Dedicated To John McDevitt Western Carolina's 1941 "Catamount", which has just gone to press, is to be the biggest and best In the history of the college, according to a member of the staff. Quantity and quality, is the main purpose of the staff. The annual is dedicated to John Worth McDevitt, alumni secretary of the college, and carries a full page picture of Mr. McDevitt. The Miller Press of Asheville is doing the work. The theme of the "Catamount" is life on the campus in the every-day actions of the students. Large division pages will feature group pictures of students snapped before the various buildings. An effort has been made to represent a large number of students in more phases of life than has been shown in any previous yearbook. Each class will have a section for informal snapshots of members of its group. Informal snapshots of organizations within the class will be included in the class sections. Fused pictures will not be I will present used this year, clear cut snap- With You" at Rabun Gap Col- shots taking their place. The lege, Rabun Gap, Georgia, Sat- staff believes that good, clear, urday evening, May 23. The pictures are preferable to cheap Sophomore class of Rabun Gap fusing. Individual pictures of the College is sponsoring the pro- Summer School To Have Noted Faculty Members Pierre S. Porshovsklkov, professor of history, modern languages, and Shakespeare a t Oglethorpe university will be among the many noted faculty members of the summer school. Mr. Porshoskikov is the author of the book, "Shakespeare Unmasked." James P. Sifferd, superintendent of schools in Stanly county, and F. M. Waters, superintendent of schools in Hendersonville, will also teach in the summer session. Other visiting faculty members Include: Dr. Donald P. Bean, director of the University of Chicago press; Dr. Ellsworth C. Library Secures Large Collection Of Recordings In an effort to encourage music appreciation among the students, Mrs. Lillian Buchanan, head of the library department, has purchased a number of classical records, a group of recordings dealing separately with various instruments and orchestral arrangements. Outstanding In the classical group Is a complete collection of compositions from Walt Disney's famed picture, "Fantasia", including: Bach—"Toccato and Fuge in D Minor" Tchaikowsky—"Sorcerer's Apprentice" Porchielll—"Dance of the Hours" Beethoven—"6th Symphony" Stravinsky—"Rite of Spring" Maussorgsky—"Night on Bare Mountain" ShuberU-"Ave Maria" Mrs. Buchanan has also bought four albums of famous composers, each album complete In itself: Beethoven's Symphony No. 6 in F major, entitled "Pastoral", and payed by Arthur ! Toscanlnl and the British Broadcasting Orchestra; Tsch- aikowsky's Symphony No. 5 in E minor, played by Leopold Stok- owski and the Philadelphia Sym- phon • Orchestra; Tschalkow- sky's Symphony No. 4, played by the I liladelphia Symphony Or- chest i, under the direction of Leop d Stokowski; and Edward Griei : Peer Gynt Suite No. 1, from "bsen's "Peer Gynt Suite", playi by the London Philhar- mon: Orchestra, conducted by Euge ! Gossens. Ah in the group are many indiv .ual records of outstanding a tlsts. The most notable Dent, director of the educational triumphed'over Joe ~Hedden7or departments of R. C. A. Manu- business manager of the Catamount by 53 votes, polling 188 to Hedden's 135. The election of the editor-in- chief and business manager of the "Western Carolinian" is still pending. Will Present Play At Rabun Gap College Filling their second off-the- campus engagement this year, the Western Carolina Players lis Indiana present "You Can t Take It facturing Company, Camden, N. J.; Dr. Earl E. Sechrlst, principal of the Ensley high school, Birmingham. Alabama; Oscar E. Sams, extension specialist of the University of Tennessee, Knox- vllle; Dr. William A. McCall, professor of education, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City; Dr. W. B. Town- send, director of the reading clinic at Butler University, Indianapolis. Indiana; Mrs. Town- send; and Mrs. Martha Guilford, English teacher, Indian - The W. C. T. C. band, under the direction of Mr. George S. Tracy, enjoyed an all-day out- : ing April 17. In the morning the | band presented a concert at the j Webster High School and repeated the performance In the afternoon in the Sylva Elementary School Auditorium. The day ended with a picnic back of Robertson Hall. Members of the band and their guests participated in the picnic. students in the respective classes are much larger than in the edition last year. The freshman pictures are about the same size Officers Elected For Woman's Government are: "The Moldau", by Smetana, played by the Berlin State Opera Orchestra, under the direction of Leo Blech. Johann Strauss' "Blue Danube Waltz" and "Tales from the Vienna Woods', played by Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra. "An American in Paris", a four piece symphonic-jazz work by George Gershwin noted composer known best for his jazz opera "Porgy and Bess." From this group, Mrs. Buchanan plans a series of programs one hour in length, which will be repeated daily for one week, when a new group will be selected. Program cards will be distributed, bearing the name of < the composition and the com poser's intention in writing It. Walt Whitman, in his "Years of the Modern" set the theme of the annual May Day Festival to be held on the campus Friday, May 2. The Festival will begin on Woodland Stage at four o'clock when Mrs. Virginia G. Fisher plays the overture, "The Creation" by Haydn. After the prologue, Mrs. Fisher will play "March from the Magic Flute" by Mozart lor the processional. President H, T. Hunter will crown Juanita Porter, Queen of May, who will reign over the court. A recording "Ballad for America" featuring the famous negro baritone, Paul Robeson, and a negro choral group will be played to carry out the theme. The May Pole Dance by eight college boys and girls will follow the recording. Several lines taken from Whitman's "A Song of Myself" will be read and pantomined by a group of students representing the types of Americans facing the world crisis today. The entire group will assemble on the stage t0 sing "God Bless America" accompanied by Mr. Tracy and the band. Mrs. Fisher will play the ,u. "TtltewSTj March" which will be led by boys in the navy, the army, and the air corps with United States flags, followed by the Americans, and the court. Members of the court and their escorts are: Juanita Porter, queen, Johnny Wilson; Mary Grant, maid of honor, John Henry Gesser; Attendants: Catherine Brown Wells, Harold Wells; Ruth Coggins, Herbert Cohn; Betty Penland, Jack Hen- nessee; Mary Delle Davis, Bruce Hall; Alwayne DeLozler, Bobby Hall; Lorene Browning, Hal Plonk; Frances Allison, "Rock" Plemmons; Helen Browning, W. R. Hall; Maggie Dillard, Tom Mallonee; Kate Gray, Bill Hardy. Train bearers, Betty Jean Ashbrook and Joe Dodson. Crown bearer, Bobby Abbott. The members of the committee for the May Day program are Frankie Collins, chairman; Helen Patton and Alice Benton, faculty advisors; Mary Kathryn Gardner, Mary Alice Feaster, Boyd Poole, Emmet Sams, Lillian Messer, and Carolyn Still- well. "Here (in America) individuals of all nations are melted into a a new race of men, whose labours and posterity will one day cause great changes in the world." Entertain Boys With Bridge Tournament Mary Grant of Andrews was elected president of the Woman's House Government Association of Western Carolina Teachers College in the recent election. Allene Jackson of Henderson- duction. The players and the Choral groups gave "Stephen Foster" in Sylva in March for the first as the sophomore pictures last traveling performance. year; the other classes are pro-1 The cast and production crew [J* ™*^J^lS^ portionately larger. will make the trip in the bus The staff declined to give out leaving the campus at noon on any information as to the cover Saturday, of the book other than to say Although the expenses bid fair land Eloise McBride of Raeford, secretary-treasurer. The incoming officers will assume their duties in September, 1941. an entirely new cover will be to exceed fifty-percent of the first birthday April 5. used. They promise a delightful door receipts, Rabun Gap de- , Burls Franks who plays the Dramatics Class Gives Shakespearean Play Shakespeake came to life last j Tuesday night at the regular , meeting of the Western Caro- | Una players when six members of the Dramatics Class presented three scenes from "Midsummer Night's Dream" in modern dress. Emmett Sams, the fragile young heroine with a voice like a nightingale, was wooed by Mr. andMrs. Marion McDon- Barney Love in the fashion of a aid entertained a group of boys true knight. Marcellus Buch- in their apartment at Madison anan. the wise father, Bill Hall Friday night with a bridge Troutman, the beautiful moon, tournament. Bob Wright received high score honors and Dickie Hughes received the consolation prize. Others attending the party were: Phil Ray, R. B. Knox. B. C. Moss, Delmar Pryor, David Meredith, Frank White, Forest Gardner, and Roy Phillips. surprise in the binding. Two juniors at Princeton are operating a student radio repair service. cided to run the risk of losing , part of Mrs. Kirby, and Marion money on the production just Arnold, the publicity and adver- i The average student at Mill- to have the play. This is quite.tising manager of the Players, saps college has 2V2 dates a a compliment to a dramatics are both graduates of Rabun week, according to a poll con- organization that celebrated its,Gap College. ducted by the Purple and White. and Miller Edwards, the solid and strong wall, were essential [ to the love scene. Marion Arnold, the lion, supplied the motive for the final tragedy. At the business meeting, the girls of the Western Carolina Players voted to contribute a unit of work to the British Red 'Cross Relief project being spon- j sored by the local Chapter of the Red Cross. Marjorle Honey- cutt was appointed chairman ot this activity.
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