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Trail of Tears

  • wcu_maps-76.jp2
  • Depicts the water and land routes which were used to move the Cherokee to Oklahoma, when they were forced from their homes in the Southeast. The map also depicts the history of the Cherokee Nation from the original Cherokee Territory up to the present Qualla Boundary. Included is a brief text by Duane H. King explaining the Cherokee removal and how the name "Trail of Tears" came to be. Includes text and color illustrations.
  • UK _J ORIGINAL-CHEROKEE TERRITORY .7 «=JcrtEROKEE BOUNDARY IN 1776. • , _j CHEROKEE BOUNDARY IN* 1812** ==J PRESENT CHEROKEE* RESERVATION (QUALLA BOUNDARY) =JCHER0KEE TERRITORY IN ARKANSAS (I8I*>-I828) =J CHEROKEE5 TERRITORY^CEDED^BY THE'TREAJY OF 1866 I ICHEROKPE NATION UNTIL OKLAHOMA STATEHOOD (1907) KANSAS TERRITORY MISSOURI Lebanon [Springfield « JAN TERRITORY OHIO ILLINOIS INDIANA jfJ" KENTUCKY Cape \ \lonesboro Vienna WEST VIRGINIA VIRGINIA Jm Memphis ^TENNESSEE » NashviUe McMinnvIl • Savannah Chattanooga Red Clayi*"* NORTH CAROLINA Murphy Little Rock .x ARKANSAS Waterloo Tubcu REPUBLIC OF TEXAS MISSISSIPPI Bcllcfontc , ,bia —**^S Decatur ALABAMA "14 21 SOUTH N CAROLINA .17 .,8l9--20 GEORGIA LOUISIANA . • The Published^j^luseum of'tfft Cherokee Indiarj m • *. *• *. Cherokee. North Carolina Fd KEY TO REMOVAL FORTS 1. I Water* route I I L^ND ROUTE 1. Fort Gibson 2. Fort Coffee 3. Fort Smith 4. Fort Payne 5. Fort Butler 6. Fort Cass 7. Ross's Landing 8. New Echota 9. Fort Means 10. Gunter's Landing (Guntersville) 11. Fort Cumming 12. Fort Hoskins 16 Fort Gilmer Fort Chastain Fort Dahlonega (Fort Lumpkin) Fort Buffington 17. Fort Campbell 18. Fort Cedartown 19. Fort Nevvnan 20. Fort (Hinar) Sixes 21. Fort Hembree 22. Fort Delaney 23. Fort Montgomery 24. Fort Lindsay At the time of European contact, the Cherokees were one of the most powerful I tribes in the Southeast. Their territory encompassed about 40.000 square miles in parts of eight present states. Between 1721 and 1819, a series of land cessions reduced this once vast area to the adjacent mountainous sections of North Carolina. Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama. The Treaty of New Echota, signed December 29. 1835, ceded the last remaining Cherokee lands east of the Mississippi in exchange I for equivalent holdings in the Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). Although Principal Chief John Ross collected more than 15,000 signatures denouncing the treaty as a fraud, it was ratified by the Senate on May 23. 1836. and the Cherokees were I given two years to voluntarily immigrate. When the time had expired in May. 1838. I only two thousand had left. 1 The remaining Cherokees were rounded up into makeshift stockades by 7.000 federal I and state troops. The forced removal began in June, 1838 and was completed by I April, 1839. Most Cherokees went to the west by the overland route following existing wagon trails. Others made the trip by steamboat down the Tennessee. Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, then up the Arkansas as far as it was navigable, then over land into the Indian territory. About 1,000 Cherokees, primarily in western North Carolina, managed to avoid the removal. Their descendants today comprise the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Of the more than 16,000 forced from their homes in 1838. approximately 4.000 never completed the journey to Oklahoma. Because of the human suffering and the national tragedy, the Cherokee removal will forever be known as the Trail of Tears." Text by Duane H. King. Ph.D. 4PJ;