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Thomas B. Edmonston to his parents, July 16, 1863, page 3

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Item’s are ‘child’ level descriptions to ‘parent’ objects, (e.g. one page of a whole book).

  • Thomas B. Edmonston to his parents July the 16 K.Y., Cumberland Gap Dear Parents and Family After my love love to you all I can in form you that I am in tolerable good health at this time. I am improv ing [improving] some but am not well yet. I have not been on duty since I was hurt by lightning. I am very weak yet. The health of the Regt is not very good. There is a good many sick in the Regt. There is four of our company that is has got the fever. Jasper Moore, John Cathey, Mease, Morris, James Wootten, but they are out of danger now I think all but Wooten. He has just taken this week but I think he will make the rise with it. We have not lost nary man since we come in to the war. I think that we ought to be thankful that we have been spared so well. I am thankful that I have been spared so well. as to my part I haven’t anything of interest to Page (2.) to write. we have tolerable hard times here now and have had ever since we have been here. our Rations is very short short. the men has to go on Pickett hungry sometimes and that is very hard. I would love to be at home to get something to eat. that is one place that I never saw scarce but I am well satisfied with what I get if I can only live to get home one more time. I received a letter from L C the other day. she said that mother was in bad health. I hope that she will be well before this reaches your hand Father I want you to write to me how you are getting along with your wheat and how corn looks and how oats is if you have any and how the stock is getting along I want to know how all the things is com ing on at home and how your corn holds out and if you will have enough to do you until new corn comes again or not Page (3) I am anxious to know how you are all getting along at home. I want to know when you heard from the boys and how they are getting along. I have not heard from them in sometime. R.A. and R.P. is tolerable well. as I haven’t anything of interest to write I will close for this time. hope ing to hear from you soon and often. no more but remains your son as ever Tho.s B. Edmons N. Edmonston M.A.E Mother I have quit swearing I have not swore once in two months T B -------------------------------------- William Jasper Moore, Sergeant, Co. I, 62nd Regiment. “Born on April 24, 1832. Enlisted in Haywood County at age 30, July 12, 1862, for the war. Mustered in as Sergeant. Reported present or accounted for through June 30, 1863. Captured at Cumberland gap, Tennessee, September 9, 1863. Sent to Louisville, Kentucky. Confined at Camp Douglas, Chicago, Illinois, September 26,, 1863. Paroled at Camp Douglas on March 14, 1865. Received at Boulware’s Wharf, James River, Virginia, on or about March 21, 1865, for exchange. Hospitalized at Richmond, Virginia, March 21, 1865, with scorbutus. Furloughed for thirty days on March 28, 1865. Survived the war. John T. Cathey, Sergeant, Co. I, 62nd Regiment. “Enlisted in Haywood County at age 30, July 12, 1862, for the war. Mustered in as Private. Reported present through April 30, 1863. Promoted to Sergeant on March 16, 1863. Reported present but sick on June 30, 1863. No further records.” Perhaps Robert Meece, Private, Co. I, 62nd Regiment. Perhaps Moose, a misspelling of Moses Perhaps Moses Morris, Private, Co. I, 62nd Regiment. 4 sick, so is this Mease Morris, a.k.a. Moses Morris? James E. Wootten, Private, Company I, 62nd Regiment, “Enlisted in Haywood County at age 24, July 12, 1862, for the war. Reported present or accounted for through June 30, 1863. Died at Cumberland Gap, Tennessee, on an unspecified date (probably prior to September 9, 1863). Cause of death not reported. [The correct spelling of his surname may be Wooten.]” A James Wooten appears on the 1860 census for Haywood County, Fork Pigeon post office, age 22, born in South Carolina. perhaps a stray mark here Ninian and Mary Ann Edmonston
Object
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Object’s are ‘parent’ level descriptions to ‘children’ items, (e.g. a book with pages).

  • In a letter probably written on July 16, 1863, Thomas B. Edmonston writes to his father, describing his ill health after being struck by lightning. He also names four other soldiers who are sick. He asks for information concerning his family's agricultural crops and other family members.
  • Thomas B. Edmonston to his parents July the 16 K.Y., Cumberland Gap Dear Parents and Family After my love love to you all I can in form you that I am in tolerable good health at this time. I am improv ing [improving] some but am not well yet. I have not been on duty since I was hurt by lightning. I am very weak yet. The health of the Regt is not very good. There is a good many sick in the Regt. There is four of our company that is has got the fever. Jasper Moore, John Cathey, Mease, Morris, James Wootten, but they are out of danger now I think all but Wooten. He has just taken this week but I think he will make the rise with it. We have not lost nary man since we come in to the war. I think that we ought to be thankful that we have been spared so well. I am thankful that I have been spared so well. as to my part I haven’t anything of interest to Page (2.) to write. we have tolerable hard times here now and have had ever since we have been here. our Rations is very short short. the men has to go on Pickett hungry sometimes and that is very hard. I would love to be at home to get something to eat. that is one place that I never saw scarce but I am well satisfied with what I get if I can only live to get home one more time. I received a letter from L C the other day. she said that mother was in bad health. I hope that she will be well before this reaches your hand Father I want you to write to me how you are getting along with your wheat and how corn looks and how oats is if you have any and how the stock is getting along I want to know how all the things is com ing on at home and how your corn holds out and if you will have enough to do you until new corn comes again or not Page (3) I am anxious to know how you are all getting along at home. I want to know when you heard from the boys and how they are getting along. I have not heard from them in sometime. R.A. and R.P. is tolerable well. as I haven’t anything of interest to write I will close for this time. hope ing to hear from you soon and often. no more but remains your son as ever Tho.s B. Edmons N. Edmonston M.A.E Mother I have quit swearing I have not swore once in two months T B -------------------------------------- William Jasper Moore, Sergeant, Co. I, 62nd Regiment. “Born on April 24, 1832. Enlisted in Haywood County at age 30, July 12, 1862, for the war. Mustered in as Sergeant. Reported present or accounted for through June 30, 1863. Captured at Cumberland gap, Tennessee, September 9, 1863. Sent to Louisville, Kentucky. Confined at Camp Douglas, Chicago, Illinois, September 26,, 1863. Paroled at Camp Douglas on March 14, 1865. Received at Boulware’s Wharf, James River, Virginia, on or about March 21, 1865, for exchange. Hospitalized at Richmond, Virginia, March 21, 1865, with scorbutus. Furloughed for thirty days on March 28, 1865. Survived the war. John T. Cathey, Sergeant, Co. I, 62nd Regiment. “Enlisted in Haywood County at age 30, July 12, 1862, for the war. Mustered in as Private. Reported present through April 30, 1863. Promoted to Sergeant on March 16, 1863. Reported present but sick on June 30, 1863. No further records.” Perhaps Robert Meece, Private, Co. I, 62nd Regiment. Perhaps Moose, a misspelling of Moses Perhaps Moses Morris, Private, Co. I, 62nd Regiment. 4 sick, so is this Mease Morris, a.k.a. Moses Morris? James E. Wootten, Private, Company I, 62nd Regiment, “Enlisted in Haywood County at age 24, July 12, 1862, for the war. Reported present or accounted for through June 30, 1863. Died at Cumberland Gap, Tennessee, on an unspecified date (probably prior to September 9, 1863). Cause of death not reported. [The correct spelling of his surname may be Wooten.]” A James Wooten appears on the 1860 census for Haywood County, Fork Pigeon post office, age 22, born in South Carolina. perhaps a stray mark here Ninian and Mary Ann Edmonston