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The Log Vol. 27 No. 01

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  • Between 1914 and the late 1960s, the Champion Paper and Fibre Company published an internal newsletter, called The Log, to share news about the Canton mill, the community, and its employees. After 1940, news from the entire “Champion Family,” which included mills in Hamilton, Ohio; Houston, Texas and Sandersville, Georgia, was featured in each issue.
  • - IN THIS ISSUE The Red Cross ------------- -- ---- 2 R0 bot.B m0: bs _ .. __________ __ _____ .. _ 3 Abraham Lincoln _ _ _ 4 George Washington _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 5 Editorials - - -- - ---------- _____ __ __ .6 CHAMPJ.ON FAMILY NEWS Ham.tlten Division _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 8 Ca:nt on ".v1'V·1·S1 on _________ _____ ____ ?~ 4 H. ous t on D"I 'V.I S' ion _________ _ _ _ ____ _ 37 OF CHAMPION C T IV I Tl ES ' FEBRUARY 1945 VOL. xxvn NUMBER 1 Our Cover Picture ON thi months cover, we have reproduced of George Washington, by Gilbert Stuart. trait was painted in 1795. • • a p atntm.g 'fhis por- Gilbert Stuart, a distinguished American portrait-paint­er was born in Narragansett, R.I., December 3, 1755. It is ' ' said, he began to draw early in life, but none of his sketches have been preserved. His first known pictures are of two Spani h dogs, and two portraits, the latter painted when he was thirteen years old, and now in the Redwood Library, Newport. In 1770-71, he received some instructions from a Scotch artist named Alexander, who took him to Scotl~nd in 1772. Two years afterwards, Stuart returned to America and painted portraits in Newport, Rhode Island, and Phila­delphia until 17?5, when he sailed for London, where for a time he played the organ in a small church. In 1792, he re­turned to America, and early in ·1795, Stuart painted his first picture of George Washington, shown on the cover of this magazine. It is said that Gilbert Stuart painted three portraits of Washington, but this one exhibiting the right side of his face, is undoubtedly the truest of the paintings of Washington by Gilbert Stuart. The second was a full-length portrait, and the third a Vignette head. • Gilbert Stuart's paintings, which number about 215, are aid to be remarkable for strength, dignity, and rich color and are to. be found in the chief museums of the country. The portrait reproduced on our front cover was loaned to us by ] he Metropolitan Museum. of Art, New York City. Mr. Stuart remained in Philadelphia until 1 03, when h r moved to Washingt n; two years lat r, h settl d in Bo,­ton, where he died, July 27, 1828. • PUBLISHED BY "THE CHAMPION FAMILY" HAMILTON. OHIO ' CANTON. N. C. : HOUSTON, TEXAS : SANDERSVILLE. QA. Established 1914 - - - - Thh·ty.first Year of Publication The papeF for the cov'&t of this maga.zine is Clia.lnpion Kr()mekote, and the paper for the inaide paqes is Champion White Salin Refold Enamel. We rnanufachue many gndes of bleached papers. MaehlBe Finished, Super Calendered, and Coated. .' - ross • • ur 10 HELP PRI 0 . 7ER,' Tbe Intcrnati nal Red 'r . :;: '"~t lw < v 'r th ' If re f ·war prison r f all c untries that ha ~ ratifi l th nven-ti n em' .ring thi pha ·e f ' ·arfar . 'h · ommitt' ', d"l "- .. M • • o • '0 ~·ate' mak pen dtc YI8Lt,' to pn.~oner ( \ ctr Camps, H1~p t 0 hou ing and foud, tall ~ ) t l )t' . ' 1 en, on r~ · .1. s n r pr . 'lla-tiv in pri\'acy, asccrtJm phy,'lcal and :pmtual nt~ed ·, • n i ee they are propcd.,: c<u- i f r. « « \-H LE BLC OD The Red .ros Bl od D nor Sen·i · n \' .-:upplies ,, h lc bl od to the armed force· in addition to providin f r the plasma program. \-hole blood is fl ·wn t th · :war tL cat r \·here it is l.red to supplement plasma tran ·fusi n ~ . }}~({({ READL 'G ::\IATERL-\L To meet demand f r reading 'material aboard hospital ship and o\-er~ ea the Ameri an R d Cr · has ent 2,832,­- 6 book and rna azin s ~ in e July I, 1943. l} » ({ (( ' FIR T AID FOR CHILDREN Ei hth grade pupils of ·~vi ihvaukee County, '~Tisconsin, rural school are learning first aid from county police. The . herifP office repo rt~ a marked decrease in home and school accidents among the-e pupil . All 53 . motorcycle patrol of­ficer of the sheriff office are Red Cro s first. aid instructors. )) )} (( (( . RED CROSS HO PITAL "ORKERS There are 1,600 Red Cross hospital workers overseas. They pro -ide medical" social service and recreation to the wounded and advise concerning government benefits and Red Cros services available on their return horne. )) )} (( (( 1viEDICAL KITS FOR PRISO: "ERS Red Cross medical ki ts for prisoners of war contain stan­dard preparations in quantities su fficient for 100 men for one month. )) )} « « RED CROSS CLUBMOBILES The American Red Cross JJas 200 dubm bile in pera­tion. Of ... hese, 39 are cinemobiles, which brin 7 movie and music to our fighting men in th field. )) )) {( (( . RED CROSS STREAMLINES HOME NURSING RS ·. · "Six Lessons in Care f the Si k'' is the tit! · of a new streamlined Red ross cours · rcquirinr but 12 hour. of a­t ndance by students, who learn 32 basi· pr0 dur us d in h m nur ing. De ·io·ned ciall , f r o ]('C ' t r ;~.nd factory workers 'with limit d leis rrc time Red · t hapt rs are providing this short r ed but comprd 11 i r • onr in centrally located classwoms. Wherever given, th ourse i popular. n I land, for e ample, cla es for indu strial o-roup w . re l ld this f Jl. Cla srooms frequently wcr f umish d by th m na -m nt of participating concern., wlich included the Higb e Com- (2) • e I en n ron p n:, th .. lay ·· 11nrany, \ m. T ay!r1r • otJ & 't ;., .and th ~ail· . . mrLny. T ~lt•phiJIIC\'(Jr· ' at '110 ucla · e. a the Y. ,V. . r\. · nd still other ~J.t')Up~ m ·t a Zion Hill Baf ti ·t hur h. 'lase fHt -Gl [ u b>tLJ(! planm:tl nt Thr)mpon Air-craft hi J ' rrin ·ohafr) L' m on nd ,·e. i<JO~, Parker p­pli · n ·c '(Jmp· ny, th e l ntcrJ'J. · timYl Inti ttte, and Lindner C omp:m y. Pr > f ~s ion' I ur·es ca h Jas ·s limi ed 10 10 member to it : ur pr· ti " tim f r each. The course is ba ed on tea hi ng m th ds dcv •l1 pcd by the ,.. raini g Wi hin lndu ·­lr 'ervic . f he \Var Manpower 'ornmi slon, and applies th am ·' dfi iency used in indus rial job trainin '· I< 1 Y LIGHT BlJLBS TO IT -L Y 'I o b 'at the blacl· market in Italy the Reel Cros ' recently shipped 2,500 light bulbs by air and 7,5 0 by boat fo:r use in its servicemen's clubs. hipmcnt . of 100 small pianos for Red Cros hospital recreation room have al o been made to l taly. ).) )) (( {( FLIGHT KITS FOR WOCNDED Red Cross flight kit are provided wounded men evacuat­ed from ·the Middle East to hospitals back home. Kits con­tain games, magazine , candy, and other item . )) )) (( (( - BEACH-HEAD CAN1 EEN Three hours· after the initial landing on Leyte, P. I., American Red Cross men had establi hed beach-head can­teens serving coffee and other refre hment . )) }) {( (( AID ?vlERCHANT SAILORS Upon their return to Eno-land after D-Day op r tion off Iormandy, the American Red Cro gave emer ency aid to merchant seamen representing 33 countrie . Social Security Field Office Will . Help You Sometirn s young ' ido · ·, aged parents an l rphan do not kn w they 'ar eligibl for b n !1t an i 1 .:e money hrouo-h lclay in fi ling their chims. ~1 -m pers n ' p1 t 5 a re n ow li.giblc f r b ··w·fits when ver th ')' qu it w~.. rk. Th wacre earner ~ h uld inqtrir ab ut l. i"' bene firs when h at-tail 6 ·v n rh u h h ontinues to\' rk. Ir 'tdditi n t th · monthly old ag • b nd1t payabl to 'h i11 Su r d w -rJ er him ·elf 'lt th a,re f 5 r after, t.h Peel al lel -A and Stlr iv r. ln, 'llfnnc system pr Jvid · for month! b r1cfit~ to men:tt ·r of hi·s bmily. B n_cfit. at al~n avuhl "' to l i famil nt bis d lh, ·V hntevcr hi· ii°C. B ~n· flt t H;;tlin · $J 8,300POO a month ·w IT .in { )t" • in u u· f this :1r fr,r 1,0 0000 ben ·ft ian' '. A ~ rul j thi , : vVh~.:n in d ubt ·1b ut rou r rr(·ht to J l-· }·· an l survi or in ·uran b nefiL isit tlw 1.< ,~ 1 offi · <.;f th , -.c i I S curi ry Board. Jo m.arter '' h r y 'u' )rk r li •e, y u'r · probaUy not very ·~ar from, a ... ·oci ... ! S • 'L~rity . B rd field office cf f r m on of .ItS part-till s ·'r 1 . p l l'lt"' . You ca!'l get it addrc:;s fr m y u r local telepohne dire tory. • • ave _...ericas Robomb Is a Big Improvement Over The German V-1 Robot Bomb l • h . b mb - · re fi r · t intr due d int m dern warfa re ~: ' Ge mans bu Am rica) \-Ve under tand, ha. - perfect d e " ·an ·ee Do cUe" rob m b \1\'hi h is much m r !_: owerful ca~ " handLed much more ac u rate1 .. than tbe 1 rman \ -1. \Ya hingt 1 report r predict that American r bomb v;·ill play a i part in the \ ar in 194- . . Befo e he Pearl H arbor incident ' e had been warned f the ea hery f the J ap · -that th y were plannin ')' mis hieL u · \·e did n t belie 'C it. and it co ·t u plenty ; \ iVC did n t eli ,;e th J ap could take the P hilippine -"-,they did, and man.~ o her i·Iand- and p :se si n of the Allie ; \Ve thouaht we had the 1erman 1i 1· d and the war in Europe would be OYer in a fe~· \·eek .-a ~ a r -ult, th usancl- of the llied ldi e a e t lav- re·tino- b neath the sod. Re e tJ · i wa -rated bv one f our Admirals that the G ... r an ... , ~tan early date m.i ht t l e robot bomb on Ameri­C: ll cities in the ea -t~--~o me people ridiculed the idea, lea,·in o­tbe impre ~i n it can't happen to u ~ . " It eems that it i ' me ·e be~ an to believe that an · thing mi o-ht hap en-n t he Bo cock ure about every thin o-~be on the alert and pre­ared f r the worst at all time~. The people of Great Britain \Vere not alarmed when they v·ere threate.ned vvith German robot bomb -did not think 1· .r a very effecti,~e weapon, but thousands of people have en killed and cri led and hundreds of thou and ~ of build­. "g' de-uoyed with thi ~ ecret weapon. Recently atcord­: ne o re ore. ( even ch ildren in one family in London, ra ging in a e from one to seventeen year , were killed vvhen a G"'rn an \ '-1 bomb landed just out- ide their home.' The 1o .her who had o-one to v i ~1 t a neio-hbor a few hund red :a J- ~,i\.a\· . e,.caped injury. \Ye had better top kidding our, eh e . get down to busi·- . 1es~ and win thi war. Better k ill the turkey before we start an·in<r it, and di tributino- it to other nation - we might lose t! i- ·ar, and Hitler mi-o-ht yet make the peace unle s our e er ' ake thi ' war more seri u ly and realize that we are t.r a.gain -t a t ugh nemy-a b ra gart eldom win a battle. THE END OF THE TRAIL. This photo. taken in England, shows the remains of a "flyiaq bomb" July 3, 1944. Signal Corps Photo (3) • HITLER'S "SECRET" WEAPON . . . The "Robot Plane/' a secret weapon Hitler promised the Allies. dives down on its deadly mission over a c:ity in southern England, June 22, 1944. Signal Corps Photo. "Not Posted" Som.e day T rn goin' to buy a great woodland, Where Lots o' .fish and wild game grow, An' Tm gain' to hang out a sign ((Not P osted- C 0111-e in an~ hunt a11/ .fish until you are ready to go.JJ A h yes.' 1 lcnow it's a bit different Fro1n the spirit fo lks usually display, But, somehow it>s just a pa·rt o' me, To welcrnne folkJ around my U!ay. ]' rn 1wt .rure, b ut I )r n a-gu e.r n.n. ', T hat when we re weighed on judgme·nt day ~ We'Ll not be in any less fa v or, For welr.:0111in' folk around our wa). And I may be away off, b·u.t I doubt it, When f gue s Saint Peter'lL sa,' , ( ( ' You zoelromed your neil!,hb r down th ere ye t ;day, So y ;u're 'lvel ·ome up lu re today. ]) · D 'f J nut , z )0u ve hu ng up n er bo ten ,S.?.f !.n . j And clrJ.red ) rJur gat'S to your fellow nun, You'LL fi~nd a big pad/a /~ on the gatr.r of ltea" e11 .1.nd old Saint Pete will ·n t let you in. f Abraham Lincoln Sixteenth President of The United States March 4, 1861 April 15, 1865 In the followin letter to l\!Iajor-General Hooker, Abra­ham Lincoln s under ta-nding of human nature is beautifully disclo ed. It i interesting to note how adroitly he praises M ajar-General Hooker and how effectively he rebukes him for criticizing hi vupe rior office r. Major-General Hooker: E xecutive Mansion Washington, ] anuary 26, 1863 I have placed you at the head of the Army of the P oto­mac. Of cou rse, I have done this upon what appea rs to me to be uffi t ient rea ons and ye I think it best for you to know that there are some thing in regard to which I am not quite satisfied with you. I believe you to be a brave and ski liful so1cli r, which f cou rse, I like. I al so believe y u do not mix poli ic with y ur pr f s­s i on ~ in which y u ar right. Y u hav confi.dence in y urself, whi ch is valua bl · if 1 ot indi pensa ble qu ality. You are ambitious, which, with in r asor able bound d s go d rath P-r than harm, but I think th: t durin.r• 1eneral Burn side's command f th Army you have t aken utr . l of your ambiti n and thwart d him as mu has y u uld, in which ou did a great wron to 1 he oun ry and to a m 't merit rious and h norable br thcr offi er. I ha b ard in su h a way as to beli ve it, of ur r - cent1y aying tbat both the Army ancl the G \'Crnm nt need d a di tator. Of cour. ", it was not for thi , but in pite • (4) it .th t T ha · i '0\1 th cnnm nd. nly h g - r Is ·h p.:1in 11cc can t up dicta or·. \ ha f now a. k of . -cnl is 1i1iurr 11 ·e , J will ri k diet t r-hiJ . Th · go, .,rnrrwnt \!·ill op •ort yo to th ~ u mn t of it· < l ilit,\ ' hiLh i t ·ith ~r mo e nnr t • he it h . dnne an ill dn fnr ( ll (j lnl ndrr . 1 mach . e r hat fljc ' irit you h.n · id · l to infw( intt th my, of critJcizinrr rheir com­m ndt:r, • nd ·it hhnJ in 7 nfi 1 "fl · frt:nl him. ,v-iii now turn upPn nu. J h.dl ; 8:-ii !' you as far as 1 can lQ put it down . .. 'e rtb •r r 1 nor ' pt l·on, if h V" r aliv ag in, co ld get fltl\ • oud out >f .w rmy whil, uch pi it pr ·vail in i . \ nd no\: l w r · ;[ 1 .., n ; b ar I ra bn s, bu wi h ·n ·tgy ... nd lc ·r I sc; vi ·i lan c ",. fon 'td and give u vic- . llltl ;:, ' ours v ry ruly, . incoln Presid 1 of thf' 1 ·.,red ·tate C mm •nt ing 11 lh ab ve l t er, h late f~lberr Hnb­barJ , philosoph ·r · nd 11cc ·ssf d b ~ ~ine mau, aid. "If you "'" rl· ft r ma , in heav ns name work for him: If he pay­yo 1 v acres that sup ly you your bread and but er. work for him - SJ. eak w lJ of hi m, think well of him, tand by him a,nd sta nd by the ins itu ·ion he repre-en . I would give an un ii vidcd se rvi e or none." E lbert Hubbard' eve ry employee wb c mments contain advice profitable to heed his counseL The land and water area of the ~ ctherlands East l ndie is about" equal to the land area of the continental l"nited States. }) )) (( (( vVhen war broke out in Europe in September, 1939, there were less than 200,000 men in the 1nited tate Army, and less than 100,000 in the Navy. CHAMPIONS MEET IN ENGLAND J. C. Mell, formerly of the Houston Division of The Champion Papn and Fibre Company. now in the Armecd Se~vice. is shown 1n the picture above with Mr. and Mrs. Percy Pae-tz of England. Mr. Paetz is the Cham­pion te.presentative ln Europe, and takes great pleasure in enterht~ning Champion boys in the Armed Service, while ~n Encgland. Mr. Mell ls on the riqht. • orge Washington First President of the United States i e 'ra, hin ert n' familv or enealo ical tree doe < , m o be a v r, intere·tin document. In fact, hi " · ~ ce~t -v can be t raced no further back than hi reat-grand-a her.- ,-ho ettle i in Virginia about 1657. Hi fathe~ died ' ·h . 1 eoree. \~· a ju t a lad, leavin him in po ~ e ion of the ,jd hame~tead in tafford County Vi rainia . . -en· little i known of the earh life of \Vas11 in ton. The n ,. of the h atchet and cherr) tree, no doubt i fi titious­i ·e-nted by hi bioo-rapher , and is not a true tory. Hi life~ o doubt. ~Yas not different from that c mmon to Vir inia famili.e· in ea cj rcum tance . It i aid. that " hi education "a · u elementary and defecti\.·e except in mathematic ." \ra hin ton was born February 22, 1732, and at the age of 16. he was appointed urveyor of the en rmou Thomas Fairfax es tate in ·irginia and the next three years of his life \re re spent in this ervice. At the age f 19 he was ap­. ointed adjutant o£ the \ irginia troop with rank of Major, and in i 7 -,.,, he wa made commander of the northern d is- , ri ·t of Viro-inia. In 1 r3-- 4, at the outbreak of the French and Indian war. George \Va hin<rton wa sent by Governor Dinwiddie of Vir inia, w warn the French in Penn yl a nia. After his ,-j orm1 ~ d efen e of Fort Nece -sity, he wa commi sioned comma nd er-in-chief of all the Virainia force at the age of 23. F o r a · ear or two thereafter hi ta -k wa that of defend­inC' a frontier of more than '"0 mile with 700 men. But in 1 r-, commanding the advance aua rd, he captured Fort du Que-ne. now Pitt burg, and renamed it Fort Pitt. For the next n ·enry year , hi iife wa mere] that of a typical Vir- .· ia lan er. It i · aid in the mo\ e again ~ t Fort du Qu·esne, , , troop~ fell into an ambu cade of Indians and Major­, e er l Edward Bradley wa mortally wound d and half of hi ~ men lain but W a hinaton, \vho was the mo:-t conspicum.1s mark for Indian bullet · e caped unharmed and later a· colonial rninister declared in a ermon, it wa hi belief that the youn0 man, Geor e \Vashin ton, had been preserved to t: ''the aviour of hi countr ." J H vas repeatedl. elected to the Vir inia legi lature, and in 1774. the \ ir inia Convention a ppointed Washington as one of the deleaate · to the Continental Congre . Thi was really the beginnino of his national ·career. The two most im ortant colonie at that time were Virginia and l\1as achu­t -, and Col n l \Va h ington, who was at the head of all the military committee . was ju t the man whom the ew En land del o-ate de- ired. On motion of John Adams of ,.; la · achu - ett ~ , George Wa.· hinaton wa made c mmandcr­i -chief of the Armed Forc:es of the U nited Colonie . A life spent worthily by year .- · he rid an. hould be mea ured b.v d ed ' not, Ver few do their very best-that's wh here' always so mu h room for improvement.-M arti1t V anbee. 'Y~rf}:inl11 has never made a worry go, 1 hmking of them only makes tfiem grow. -R. D. 'Fat er, what do they mean by Gentlemen farmers:'' ·Gentlemen farmer , my son, are farmers who eldom r i e anything except their hats." (S) ·- ; ' A Correction In the January issue, we ran ·the abo e· picture of l\!Ir. and M r s. Clarke l\!Ia ri on , and by some peculiar " twist' of the mind, the name was changed to read, l\t1arion Clarke, and Mrs. Clarke, whi ch we regret very much, and hope to make amends by correcting our mistake in this is ue. The cut line should have read: Clarke lVIarion , Vic· President of The Champion Paper and Fibre Company, o lving wo rld problems with a whittling 1 nife and stick. Pic­ture taken on recent vi it to North Carolina. Mrs. J\!farion keeps a close watch ·while 11Ir. Ni arion v hittles, lest he make the vnon move and ca u c unneces­sary blo d shed. A w rri d n 'gro walk dint tJ e offic of tbe R nt ntrol Admini strat r in a 'I ·nnes e a rea n t 1 n f a0 and rrs l· cl if < m one could tell him wh hi s Jan ll rd wa . "Y ur lancl'l ord," a l rk t lJ birn " is the m n u p .. rent to." ' j u'1 on 't pa n r n t ., " SQ.J J · [J • 1 , T . T u s b 1 ut I ine years ao-o I found m a h )ll ' . aca nt and mo red in. I been th ·rc c ·r , in. e a nd ain't .n ~v ~ r paid n r nt." "W 11, th n," , aid th l rk, "what £Lr • , u w rr rinl about? You ha v • n ) m.r laint." · 'Ya sui ' r gu ss you j ri l'ht. Pu if scm . I clo ' :fL that r o f, r ., mna m ve ut.' ----------------------------- Fir t , ·sip- Why djd they " iH< t ' ? Second · o sip-Nobodv kn w . Fir t Gossip- Oh, how 'terrible! Pubiished by 'The Cham1 ion Famil ·" · a · 'mb I c f h ~ Coo:r eration and ;ood _~ ello :~:t>hip E [·ring at th Plar ts of The Champion P:ll er and ~ il r · om1 .:u1 · • Hamilton, Ohio· ant n~ l- rth arolina · H u~ton, Te ·a~ ~ nd nJer viHe, J orgi~. G. W. PHit.LIPS ____ _________________ __ __ Edi•or, Canton. North Carolina R£tfBEN B. ROBERTSON. JR. __________ . _ •• __ -. -_____ . Associate Editor DWIGHT J. THOMSON ____ • __ • _ ••• ___ • ~ _ .• _ .•• __ .••• _Associate Editor E.l\llEBSO · ROBINSON ___ . _______ _ .. __ .• _As sis ian t tdltor. Hamilton. Ohio A. . l'OtmY. ______ . _____ ____ ___ . __ .. Assistant Edi tor, Housto~ 'l'exas All artie es in this 1n g-a:.ine are ;:.,-ittt. n .by I he editor except tl;ose :.chich arry tlu1 110me of the author. ' The Basis of World Peace "God is our refuge and strength; a very present help in ·trouble: therefore we lvill not fear." {... Therefore all thing wha t ·oever ye would that need ~ hould do to you, do ye even o to them: for this is the law and the prophets. ' This, for ages, has-been ca lled the Gold­en Rule becau ,e it embodies the rule of action, which, if human beings always followed in their dealings with each other, there would be no more wars. The words - "God. is our refuge and st rength ; a very present help in trouble : therefore, we VI ill not fea r," was Vi-ritten in a time of nat1onal distress like that of today. ­The enemy was approaching J erusalem, - the people were in a panic, but there was one in the great throng lll'ho was calm and unafraid, who said "don't forge t God, Remember, the Lord of hosts is with us." H H itler and the German people had followed the teach­ings of the Golden Rule instead of nazii sm, bow different would be the story of world conditions today. And if we have world peace it wiH he on the basis of the ''Golden Rule", ,established by J esus Christ, nearly 2,00G years ago, t here is no other way. You wi ll note tt1at Je us does no say, it is a good rule to follow~ that it is in accord with the prin­ciples of the Divine order i.n the law and the prophets, but it IS th.e law and th prophets. It comprises love to God and our fellow man. · It say that we sh uld do unto o hers as we wi l1 b ·m to do· unto us. lf we desire to hav ou r n igh bors l vc us, we mu. t love them. FI re t hen i tl e Divin ·. law .0£ livin together in peace and happine s. Vi lenc and thr ts win do no good _,only make .m9!tters wors ~. A r 1 ss pa si n will heal n wounds, nor vvill it subdu<e a h stile fe lii,}g. In Proverbs ·we read : "A soft answer turncth . a va '- ra h: -bu t rievous words stir up angcr/y which) fr rh xp d . nc we have lear ned t be tru . J e:Su Chri t also said: 'Peace I Jeav · with you, my peace I give unto you; th erefore, let not your heart be t roubled, • (6) ncitl-Pr le it he fraid."' The. c · r ' im _s of v 'r trial o miiLi n. f ttotx! reoplcl hut · mu ·t o.t t t f ·ar, r· n~..:, a 1d hat cd f!l~ ster our , uu ls- we must n.ot fur ret ;<.;d, lor let the p · sslPfl f h.n 1 · s us. R 'tl1t:mbcr. .rod is 1 v and "c are exh :rt d u , n t only lov · < .od. hut love our neighb a l sc~. Lo · . c f <; :t.d antl your nci h or • e ·m t-n be he only l <ltil:< of \-\ )rlcl e . Heating Homes By Reflection Artiflcial heat will not b con · idersd in the modem home 'The c n: tru r-i ,m 1A the mod ru lome will be vas iy dif-fer t fro th hom · (Jf 0day, according tu Pardu ini-r ity Res arch Foundation. The air cmperat re on he in si Lc will b- th same as the outdoor temperature, ye , arti­ficial heat ':rill not be required to keep warm. arl ' . B e ter, ho.usmg research execu ive of the Pardue n.iv rsity Re-earch FOlmdation, claims "A heati.ng system cl.oes not really impart heat to a. person, lmt it is only a means f r controllin.g the rat at which the body lose . heat- the body must lose some heat but must not cool off too fast.'" According to 1\Ji r. Hoester, "the body must lose 400 heat uni s per h our or the body temperature will rise and endanger life.'" Heat, we are inf rrned, goes out from the body by radia­tion and is absorbed by the walls of the building, furniture, etc., so, the idea of the future house is to treat the inside walls, furnitu re, etc., so that they reflect heat from the body similar to a mirror- rather than absorb the hea . It is thought . that aluminum and treated glass might be the · proper material for interior walls, furniture, etc. e:ientists are now working on creating such furniture and material for sidewalls of buildings which will reflect the heat of the body, rather than allowing the heat of the body to radiate to the interior walls and furniture that would prevent heat los.ses by radia cion. . It is also suggested that for summer comfort, a refriger­ ·ating device be provided to keep t he house cool. ''A blanket­less bed {or the near futur e," :Nf r. Boester, explains i the purpose of the ·research laboratory. ''The new kind of bed won't need bedclothes; over the bed will be a radiant panel that is a source of energy. The energy input to the pand i control€ld by a variable switch. You et the switch for energy radiation according t e> your weight, age and rate of met aboli sm, and yrou wake UJ completely refre ,hed. Well, it is the same old story, ' Guess we were born 30 years too soon. ,, . ----~--------------~----- - vVhen Mike saw t he mountains in - mcrica, he rot to hi fri end, P at, in Ireland : "Come o r here at n and start farming. T11ey have o mu h ground the re pilin o- it up in hill . · Th · have no p1ace to put it. ' h li st of priz winner at a recent · icni rNld : 1\!l rs. Smith , n th ladi , ' rollin pin thr )\ incr nte t by l'w rling a pin s •nty-fi f t. · '1vh. mith w n th · hundr cl r-ard (h, h.' THOUGHT FOR THE MONTH Th 'ln el f th _ L() rcl en ·atupeth r unci about th m that f ar him, and I livercth eh 111, t s~ :u d e th'! t tb L .r 1 rs g ocl : bl ·s eel is th man th <Jt tt~I teth it him, --The Bibl , Ps-alms 34: 8, 9 ' uabbling Over Economic Position Ma Prolong the War And Cost Many Lives Ye hcn·e been v·erv 11UCh intere ted in the di CU ion " ec nth-. b,- two well kn0\>\7'll critic on Briti h-United State rt>l, i · "-.-· ir .l ohn \Vardlaw-1\lilne.' rnember of the Briti ~h rarlia ne ~ir ce 192 , an out poken critic of America; and ~~e-na or Bunon K. \Vheeler, democrat from !\!fontana who "·ere a:ked by The L. ciated Pre s, ~ \iVhat Britain and . merica hould do to :win better under tandina." .. ir J hn \.ardla w-n,lilne tate : 'I t i ea y to ee what di e ·ence, exj t between ourselve and the United State". It is more difficult to overcome them." Sir J ohn then enumera ed some of the thina" l'nited States critic have c mplained of-' B ·itain' poliq. in Greece and Ita] -aban­donment of P oland at the behest of Rus ia-Britain not tak­i ! full 'ha e of the fi hting on the western front-Britain' ~elfi.~h clin_e-in - to clo ·e empire relationships and imperiali - tic idea~.-" Theve a~e some of the an wer be ga e to Americcrn en ic . ·Above all we (Britain) c mplaining of the appar­en want of a definite policy . The United State, wants a \ ·orld-' ·ide y ~ rem of ::-ecurit.. after the war. So do we all, but can fx-'e depe,nd upon the United States to play her part in Juch a plan \hen the time comes. "In thi- countr .. (England) , we are thankful, and indeed, proud of the reat l rnited t ate" effort, but heartily dislike · he tendency to ug-ge~t that America's intervention is a kind <- o{ act of grace from sotru supe1·ior beings, who need not have en ao-ed in war at all." w ir John \Vardlaw-l\lilne pLays on the keynote of t his world war ~ uuaale, a well a largely the cause of all past ~~nd future \var - the 'Almighty Dollar. ' The Bible says, · he love of money 1s the root of all evil." And we usually pu he dollar, and that for which it tand , first . Wardlaw­:\ lilne ay : {'\Ve frankly fear for our economic position after h Yar.;'-\}'hich ~ eern to be more important than winning h"". war. ' Con~equently, we certainly fear competition ·!- 1ch will ~e tro r the po ibility of rebuilding our prewa; trsde.-Parucularly, we fear any deci ion which may be f01ced upon us nmv for the year immediatelv after the war in '•hich the nited State will have imme;1se adv-antages o -er all trade competitor ." In conclus i n and after sarcas-ic~ lly referring w American as "supe; being tp at the BotL h fear cannot be tru ted to play fair in world security," he -ay~, ·we ha\e made many mi take -but the one mistake tha neither v~;·~ nor the l. nited tates can afford to make is, to allo · any ddference hetween u to be of uch character, a;;. t0' effect ~e future happin, s of the p_eople of both. coun­tne ·. It mFrht have · unaed better rf he had a1d the happines- of the people of the wh le' world, because 'they ; perhap~. d erve to be happy a much as the p pl of Britain or tl e l-ni ed tate . · '"'ena or Burton K. \Vheeler contends : "' he Am rican reople st~H. believe that_v orld War 2 i-s , urope's war, and­J the. ~n t h people w1~ h to trengthen their relations with . e t :mted tate they mu t ace pt thi interpretation of A rnencan p ych Jo y as a bas1c premise. enat r · \Vheeler su o-oe ts the fo llowing cou rsc of action in order o- a oid misu nde rntanding and fri ti n : "Britai~ -h ~ Jd ~b n lon her raditional practic of playin, p wcr r·n}J ~C-- In E~n pe an.d thr u rhout the " rorld, balancing m ~:rou of nrtJcm~ a am t another, and smving dis enti n be- (7) Great .Atrterica ·* Jjj :tfgon IN NO~/ 7JM5, 7H£ ~VeRHGL ~IC'RAI EPF?N5 t:NOf.k5f/IN ONE IIOOR To 8UV 7 ~ P()(,W()f OF IJR£~P. ~;. IN CON'!Tf/157; 7)1£ SR.Mc AMC>UNT OF i lfBOR IN 50CIRL t,STtS~Miii'I/Y IVOtJLtJ&;yONL)' 2~ ~ /1}1{) IM?t'IL () 80Y ONL. Y 1. 9 POti#/)J IN CQ4fMIJI+/ISf ~::;-· .RV S.f/11. • LUMSER tN iHE UNITEi7 '5TAiE5 WA5 40 ~~ A60, WHEN itiE AVERA6E AIA~~tCAN CO!'lS~ EP 504 BOAR!> Feci EvERY -niAe you Btl/ JJ W~R BQIP VOV fiEI.P y(X)Je COVN7R}I I'INP yovRSELf '"'"" 00 yovR E>!Ce~ SP!N/)11/G WHF,V 7H£ WRR IS' (J.IcR • tween them. vVhile it may be sa id Americans have no right to meddle in the internal policies of the British empire,-but we should remember our b oys are n ot d ying in the Orient to restore the old British, Dutch or French empires, or to establish New American imperialism. I believe a gen·eral federation of E uropean nations would meet with the ap­proval of Russia. "Will the Briti sh people join with the people of America in demanding the immediate repudiation of the costl y slogan 'unconditional surrender.' I am not advocating here a peace negotiated with Hitler, but am urgently advocating to the world our peace term -peace terms which will form a mini­mum essential of principles upon which to build our future d ea lings with Germany.-A peace treaty that the people of both England and the United States will be willing to uphold ten and twenty years from now-otherwise the treaty will be useless." As we li sten to the eli cus ions, we ask ourselve 'whither a re we drift ing"? Each step seems to t ake us farther awa · from t hat " P ermanent P ace" we have heard so much about. Is it really p a e and ha ppin ss for the whol w rld we are eeking, or sha ll · reed and lf interest be th dominatinO' spirit in a ll of u r p stwar p lan ? R m mb r, t r d b tw n nati ns nsi. t. not merely in x rt but in imp rt also. lt cems ~ b ~;ry difficu lt to acrifi e t-he de llar f r peace and happm s f r all peoples. It is estimat d h r are appr im· tely 20 billion arr 1 f cr 1d oi l i kn wn U. S. und -. r o-round r . er . )) )) (( (( Li "J tnin{l' i r ·spo1 sibl for 13 perc nt f th for t fire ­in Am ric.1. Lend-1 as . hi mente of [ od fr m the nited States during th. lr ~t r v n m 11 hs f 1943, totaled t n and half bjJ lion po unds. - ora e 0 • I am m.nv in Belgium trying t d mY little bit t O\Yard pushin(r Hitler back into his hole .~' wrote o-t. Lun 1 ... . .F< hrne\y in a lett r r cei\·ed bv Chamr'ion ·just. a .::h rt time befor th·, Gt>rman pu 'h into B lgium and Lu .·­eml"' our}! began. By th time th is i ~ print l, " ·e knm\ the push ha nded and that Ei ~ enhower~ pledge to on­vert the o-r ate·t German o-amble into the o-reatest German cata trophe i being realized. <.; ' r. Falun ,- al 'o write : '' e have '- . been having miserable \Veather ~~rhich make~ li -ing all the more difficult. I ~ . . ,~-j h I \ve re back vvith Bob Chambers and the ganu. Here'~ hoping \>ve'll all be together acrain ' OOn. I'll be looking forward to gettin THE LoG.y Ch11mpions will reco:qnize at the left., Sql Hat.old J'. Frezee, formerly of C M Calenders, 1338 Ea:st Campbell Avenue. as he appears in the N.ethetl!Utd East Indies. Harold is a veteran of the Hollandia caropaiqn. which cut off the Japanese lBth annyJ and of Biak which helped to advance MacA.rthur's f&rcea several hun':lred miles closer to Tokyoh With Haro-ld is M/ Sqt. Raymond Steiabieker, Cincinnati. • Emerson Robinson. AsSistant Editor a ew ow I• s' ' • m £ the oth r 1 tte rs said: PF -. FREE, 1 N NIOR AN, JR., FPO, S. n } rancis o-TH:- Lo and · HIPS a re still oming in on schedu] e. THE L ... is a nne magazine and all the . boys here njoy reading it. It does eem a little funny to see pi ctures of vvonH~n doing jobs forme rly done by guy like me. I'm glad they are doing a grand job. JOHN A. SHARP, S 2/c, FPO, New Yod;:-They sure do keep us boys on the ball here, going day and night. It will be a great day when all of us can come home to stay and be with our old friends again. STAFF SGT. ]. ]. RE·YNOLDS, APO New York- I have been on the Ledo road in Burma and India and also have been on the Burma Road. ~ e are nuv.r stationed in China where we hop.e to stay for a while. In com­ing here we Ilew over the Himalaya ... /fountains, known as the hump. PFC. v' ALTER L. GETZ, APO, New York-After I arrived in Eng­land, I wa moved from one place to another and never did ha ve a regular acldres . I was in England about two_ weeks ·then wa sent to France and to the front line to an outfit. I only la sted about th ree weeks when my legs gave out and I was sent back to a hos­pital .in Englanc1 wher I tay d f c about two and a half months. I am nnw in France again wirh a 1\1ilitary P lice outfi.t. \Vh ile in F no-1an:d I ran into Jimm_. mirh who v a with th. Fnloading ano-, and today I ran int Tom \~! o1st nbolm t th Red ro .. He f rm e r l ' s n . 9. ST .F . · T. DO~ TROUTl\4:A. T, APO, rew York- I am nj ying h " wint t in France. I h e t be ba 'k at Champion bef ne ry mu h lon er. 1 . DA . E, . I , -, , AJ=. > · ; ~Sa n 1' ranci , o--(W itino- fr rn ·m isl nd in the Palau roup) I h· vc a chan . in ddre . A yon know '\-\1 • I~ nd " 'I n thl, i 1 Tad · epteiTtb r l7 and t JOk jt from the Jap in f ur day e,·c-ept (B) on ' ameron for a f w sniJ. ers whom we are stilt mop pin up. - I got a slurr in the arm September 27 and have been in a hos­pital recuperatin ·. 1t was not seriou a no bones were broken. \Vhcn it is not rai ning here in the day ime it i hotter than blazes. It rains 16 inches a month and it really pours. I am vaiting this V-mail under a cocoanut tree on the beach and watching the surf come in and break on the coral reef. FIRST LT. WILLIAl\1 HILL. APO, New York-We are now in Germany. We had a great Thanks. lving and were thankfur we are on German oil and not our own. I heard a ~oldi er say as he was looking over one of the -e torn cities: "Gee, I'm thankful that this town i in Germany and not in the good old U.S:A." So I think \ve all have something to be thankful for even the most forward doughboy who is thankful for getting that far. LT. CA11ERO~ BROOK , APO, New York-Two que 'tion ? Wh.ere's my LoG and where' my CHIPS. 't\1y morale hit a nev;; low vvhen I d n't get them. It's the ma. il I knm . I was up in Ger1-1:1an . . ft o-htin when I r ce iv­ecl my third wound but jt \Va -n 't b ~ d, it ju st embarr~s ed m . l\dy runner sutpri ed 'me b · g tting my K ration hot so tho e T rrv ) rk laid .in some n1 rtar , brok. m)r rn irror whik I wa, havifl cr, tc re up my rain oa t~ turne l ove-.r rn) coffee and bit m \·vh r I find it b ·t t re t ft ~ r an atta k. That vtasn t the wor .. t f it for I ju ' t b ut broke my ne k . as I cl :e for ~h ~ x hole and tbe · ro: ant ttm d hts dtv ~ for th ·artle instant. I \• as ma Ie a - ~ ualr b a notFfunt.ti nin )'aU t ladd I' : tl e ' brou0 ht ru t " de~ar . J l England. ' .B th \<•;ray, 1 have a very b autifu l L go- ·r that a (. erman dmiral decid d h ' lidn 't n l ' be was ing to Acneri i1~ s t ad of m . . J it t Brc ·t. It was du rin one f mv ri lcs after tit oasral battl es that I ~ n into a gn liP of 12 Paris , irl · \vh had 12 diffe-rent c I rs of hair. 'Y - • ' f.'· :· if.' ~ ne f -he hap ie ·t da . · lif . Th "' ride f m -· life eame ~.,A-·i r in and \r about g_queezed me · d ath ,..es, it was m) kid brother, ,. a ~ a d he r C ampi n I ha e lf't. H ·~ doin hi it and d in a ( -~ ·o . F . ~. RL L. H OD, APO .. an Fr a lCI., ...co-- I J.U . t got out of the' ho - pital af er bein treated for a wound i . the le . I v:a hot by a J ap ma­chi e nun. Had a do e call and was luc ·y to ge out of the hole alive. But l an nm\ back with my outfit and in a ion. But while I wa in the hospital I _ ot a lot of lea ure out of reading THE LoG and about the fello \' in th mill. Let er ~ al o were re eived from: Ken ~1o er, S 2/ c, OGU, U.S. NTC Great Lake , IlL Cpl. Tom Ziliox, APO, Seattle \Va h. Cpl. Thomas Hundley APO New Yo ·k. ' . Pfc. Amos Davis, APO, an Fran­crco. Earl F. Fanter Ivgvr 3/ c, FPO. San F anci co. · Pfc. Curtis Ponder FPO, San Fran- • Cl CO. Pn. Fred te\ art, . PO, New York. Capt. John K. Truitt, 316 East Vine ree , Oxford Ohio. Fred H. \Vagner. ,_ . Edwin H. Dodd APO, New -ork. Cad Robbins Nf 1/ c, FPO, San Franci co. P . George F. Schneider France. P vt Frederick W. Pieper, l\IIWSS9 9 ~ Air \Ving FMF, 1v1CAS, Cherry f> ·n , .:. . C. " . P. J. Little, APO, New York. _John \V. ·emoni , Phm 1/ c EPO, .erYork. · p, . . Theodore G. mith, APO, New York. T/ Albert E. Wiseman, APO. New York. . , P t • John W. Stone, 35-679 4-0, Btry _. I, 4- th CA Pro ., North Camp Hood, Texas_ ABNEY-MADDEN . li Luella Abney and Sot. Glenn - I dden ·ere united in rna rriage, No­~ ember 1. in. a quiet ceremony pet­furmed in Newport Kentucky. The bride chose a her weddin o: .out­fi a po . der blue suit with black ac­ce rie and ' rore a cor age of yellow i>Cb':ld •. Afte: a brief wedding trip o . 1taim, Flonda, 1-'lrs. J\,Iadden re­med o the store room office at C 1atnpi n and Sgt. Madden to his post a Camp Atterbury, Indiana. Girls' Old Fashioned ·Christmas Party 1 be Champion Girl Acti it ie· C m­mittee sp n red · an Old Fa . hi ned Chri tma Party fo r Champi n irl , Thur day, December 14, in the audi­torium of ·he nited Pre b . terian un-day chool. Cheery decoration of red bel_!. and red and reen treamer adorned the hall , and a beau iful Chri tma tree, trimmed ent irel · with • ornament and decoration made by the irl . w-a the center of attention. ' - In tead of a orab-ba rr, acb ·irl brought a ift for orne needy child. The pr ram wa compo ed of num­ber by the follov ing Champion girl : cripture read i n~,., l\1araa ret K_jndred; vo al olo . Margaret Osborne, E ileen Graff and Fay Taylor accompanied by l\!Ii s ~ El ie R emp; xylophone solo, P at Taylor· reading, Theresa Artner ; a nd an impromptu play, entitled "The Fatal Oue t,' vvith the follow ing cast: King, Clara Bell H all; Queen, Pat Taylor; Princes , Dorthada McGuire; Duke, l\.IiHie Borg erso~1; Bell Ringer, vVilma H amblin; o.ne-half the curtain, Louise v\·elsh; the other one-half the curtain, Kathr n Newkirk. . " . Dorothy Augusti ne, dressed as Santa - Clau , distributed treat boxes of candy and nuts a:Fid the food committee se rv­ed gingerbread with whipped cream and coffee. A fev days after the party the of­fice r of the Girl's Activities Commit­tee Ann Grothaus, president, and Vir­o- inia Hale sec retary-treasurer took the gifts to the Salvation Army to be u eel for the needy children of the city. SCALE DEPARTMENT CHRISTMAS PARTY • Tbe Scale Department was delight­fully entertained at a Christmas party on Sunday afternoon December 17 at the home of Mrs. Clifford Burns, 602 North D. Street. . Loui e Baker pre ented seve ral s I c­twn s on the ace rdion, and H elen Cope ang se eral numbers. Then the group gathered round the Christmas tr c for an exchan of ifts. Card and Chin­e e check rs were enjoyed and a deli­cious I unch wa ervcd td th f ll w­ing: _Clara 1vloore, Lorena Ogle by Viol~ Goi 1~. '· D r~ line ates, Kathry~ Davts, Ldl1an ~If rrni k, Louj Baker,. Ella Hamp < n Su un Loo-an, Arm.ema Par 1 y Helen Cop , Iren Lew1s, Ruby Mun ie Helen Hall Beulah Benzing, Vadia Allen and th~ hostess, Celia Burns. ' (9) True Ward .. water softener engin,eer in the turbine plant, teported a grand time when he went huntin·g near VanWert, Ohio. The pic· ture is evidence of his catch. SAMPLE DEPARTMENT CHRISTMAS PARTY · . Any excu e is a good on_e for a party m the Sample D epartment, andChrist­mas was especially good. A deliciou chicken dinner was served at noon Thursday, December 21 , in the beauti­fully decorated Sample office. After dinner, gifts hidden upon the Christ­mas tree were exchanged. Each per­son received a favor containing the name of a Secret· Pal for the coming year. Guests at the party were Far­rie Pier on and Dorothy I ssenman for­merly of the department. DO YOU REMEMBER _ When there were only wood floors Ill the Calen ler and Fini hin R m? c vVh ~ w . reache 1 300.000 pound ­productton 111 24 ho urs in . 2 lVIa­chine Ro m and io AI f s d out igar. ? Wh n _ u cut your cH y u w nt ~o the s ore r m and I l H enry r B b Chamb rs put iod1n nth ·ut from a q u ·trt bottl ? Wh 'n •11 walk ·d ~ ross B "tr with ut sh in t r in 1 s of n ? vVhen th • st r m v a v h r the M a hin Shop now is? Wh n w' ' orke tw • hift ' J 1 . h ur day and 13 h u ' uight.? • Pvt. Grover C. Stivers. Jr .. stationed at Sloan Field. TexM, is truly a member of Champion family. His Jather. Grover C. Stivers, Sr ... is in the Pipe Shop. His aunt, Etta Smalley. runs a M Cutter aane: and his cousin. Virginia Smalley, works on the C M Finishing Scales. Pvt. Arthur C. Brown.. formerly of the C M Rewinders, has many members of his family waiting a1 Champion for his safe return from the European theatre of war. He is a brother o.f Ruth Brown, C M Cutters: Lathan Brown. Coaters; and. Cornelius Hardebeck, C M Finishing. His brother-in-law is Ralph Tb.omas of the Machine Room. Another brother, formerly of C M Calenders., is PJc. William Brown. serving somewhere in France. , • n oa; 1n By Jl.f adeleine Schneider \ e hope everyone had a nice Christ­mas and a Happy 1 Tew Year. '¥e all hope and pray our next Chri stmas and .... Tew Year ~~,ill be the best of all. To be the be t we will have to have our boys home. So buy BO~DS and let's aU work harder and get them home soon. Help keep the boys alive, Bring them home in '45. )) )) (( ({ Although the roads and streets were almost impassable the past few weeks and a lot of Unl oading and Stockdig­ging boys. live in the country, they were all on the job every day. Vve ~ppreciate the ri sks they took to get m to work. Thanks boys. This is one of the reasons why we will win this war. A good American can face and beat any bstacle. n>>«« Yours truly spent my hri stm vacation with my fath er and moth r in We t Virginia. But what re all arc wondering is where Pierc McPhearson sp nt hi s. tad to see y u back M a . )) » « {( Tipp Harris has di continued his JOat farm. Reason-All the Goat have been butchered and eaten. Tipp • • swea rs that Goat meat is much better than mutton. He should know. )) )) (( (( Roy Flanery's daughter and son-in­law, Sgt. Don Schmeer, were home for the holj days . Roy was all smiles. )) )) (( (( Georae Schneider, former General Foreman of Unloading, now in F ra nee, has ju t recovered from an attack of malaria fever. We a re glad George has . recovered and is in good health an am. UUC{(( Robert Me e w nt t Richmond', Kentucky, for the h liclays. B b brought b, ck a large twi t of ood old Kentt~ c ky tobacco. Loo like our to­bacco shortag is s lvcd for the tim · being. Adr a Hi k., rockdi"""'"'r, left f r th Marines J ~uu , r 5th. o d lu k, Adn , and :-ilfe r turn. h · inloadin [ p rtm nt r i d quit a few C. ri ·rrn s ar ls fr m our boys in c i . ' w v r · h p_ y to hear r mall 0 ' th m. » » « « A k Henr · owling ondition of the treet {10) ab ut the i y the pa t f w Kempl n P\ . r·~ ler . J mpl-·n. 2tJ. funm r ly 1f thP b d~r !Tl(J!l1. W, :\'(} tlded I)- cernh ·1 l ') i G rm< ny, accllrding to a trt · CJ ,.. tt· civ ·d by hi, w if . t\lb. Iar·r· r 'l K mpl ·n, 3 1 'fain 'r re ·1. Th. \. 'f?l tl!(l C\ id 'lHlv r ·r . uffered jt t t aft t d · C ~rman " ber,.an their count ·r a1tack. ROY C. WEBSTER WOUNDED P vt. RrJy '. \Vcb_t r, zrJ .(). 1 Beat-er , wa · w<Junded December 17 in Bd­gi urn., ccording o \WJrd r C(;ived v his wife, :Vfrs. EuJa \V cbster, 132 oodman Avenue. He wa ~erving in a heavy machine gun squadmn at the tjme, according o a letter .. 1r . \Veb­ster received jus a few day before getting he message of hjs injuries. He left the mill for service last ~ 1arch 8. Robert Rogers, F 1/c (YIO.M .. 1) now has an addres change, care Fleet P.O., New York . Donald Swartz pent 22 days with his sister, Geneva Benge, C . 1 orting, over the holiday . He now has a Fleet P. 0. address out of ~ew York. l\llary Simpson, formerly of C ?\'1 Calender , has completed her ba e tra ining at Fort Des 1\Ioine Iowa, and is stationed at Camp Stoneman, Cali­fo rnia. Her pre ent addre 'S is Pvt. Mary 0. Simp on, 527132, 110th V./AC Det., Camp Ston man, Cal. we k . Henry ran to at h a bus and when he ame to he v as lying under the t u . V/ e ha e received \V rd from ., orge Papt. y ' .,_ pe. r ' form ~ r Stockdi._g r, t hat l1e will re i a m die~ 1 dis -harg fr m tb ~'br i ne s. Pal p_ h b n in th South P iH . vVc \ ill t · 1, cl to him. ) I ) ) ( ( (( L t a II m a k ' a ~ w Year' ' tio t 1vrit · to th 1 , y in th r s lu­rm d , -rvi •s mt r ft n tl is ' ar. )}))(({( lt i as r enough t b pl • s nt vVh "O li f flow a long lik s ng. Dut th man worth v hile I tb man who can mile When eve rything goes dead wrong. • ' urmurs-~-- B..., H ilma Hamblin l b 1 of I e man.y ( ?) reader . _ f i 1 JCe _ · ew". may I expre~ a eciati n to Patty Hammerle r ~o a ly taking over and \Yritin('>" c a in er s ing column la t month. e av I add that after a ·; n :~1 " \ re:t erhap you can stand ;.. H her column from me. But if I so "l c a menti n :\fargaret Levdon' .D, te. I hope that omeone will shoot 11 . . I"m o n!~· kidding, of cour·e.) )) }) (( (( Cu id ~ee m to be e\·en m 1rc acti ·e h- ·1 usua l the~e daY- , and among hi ~ ,-· · im: i: Helen Blume, ~1edical De-l ment. It'.;;. hard to decide which i;: he mo:-t dazzlin -the li.g.. ht in Hel- ·' ·, e.v e· and her -mile.- or the beauti-iut Jiam nd on the third finger of her ~ lef hand. Be t wi hes. He! n, and ,-j I you tell ~·our fiance for u , just rh:n a luckv man he i . • » )) (( (( Ollie Bi~h o p. teno Pool, i ~ al o se ino- a diamond and that far away . o · in her ev. e . And while Lola Shoe- 1 ~aker, ~l ail De:k. doe·n't have a ~.;iamon . :he did have a date with the ··- 1 ::- ,. nderful sailor-hone tly, he loo ·~ · . t like \"an Tohn on." . ' )} )) « « \Y htl · ,,-e are truggling through ice nJ ~ ow and leet and cold \veatber, Li" \- "huler, from Herb Randall's of- • < .ce. i: enjoyino- all the warmth and · un~hi ne of California. (\elL what 1i he -t n i~n't hining it s \Yarm there i "t j .) » » (( « .\!thou h it seem~ a little late to be '- 'i ·inz or initing about Chri tmas fe<.i ·i ie -. \Ve might mention that there · :e ·everal ay partie here and . - e. The Trafl]c Department had a _!m,er party at the Elk Club which a much enjoyed by all; and accord­] ·? t report the Lab party was some- ·. · er-but then the. alway are. J fact. one \·onder \·hat one \'ould ·e to do to o-et a bid to one of their )) )} « '' 11Ie .\CLiviries buiJdjn o-, oo, was the -c · e uf a gay party. And while I'm t e 1bje t of Employee Relations U 1 r men t I ' ·ant 1 o u ~ e-t that a r rt r be aproimed and a column ritttn bout Activitie in the Ac­i :tie De_ artment and take it irom Ll . i would be very intere tin read-ir.~. I i rht ao so far as to add that if .h -r dm 't do this wi thin a reason- leng of time, your trul will .:;tar reportino- for them. (That to be threat en urrh t mak come rt.cros - ""·irh anything.) } ) )) {( ({ 'Arriving or Leavino-~ . , ~ ecm . t) be a time! que ' tion the:::.e day ·. .\m mg tho-e ~rri\'in..g.. arc .T u anita Kincer, :\Ian· Ann Packer, Dnr thy l ne , and Blan.che .. hield.. \Yelcon{e: each and all. \~e tru:t that by thi: time you all al · adr feel like full-fledged mcm!- ers of ''The Family~. nd among- those • < Jca,·in arc Helen Schu bert Argadine who has left us to join her hu sband. Go d luck, Helen, and while we mi ss you m re than we can say. we hope you \vill get to ~ tay a l ng lono- time and that the dav will come soon when you and the thou and of girls like you won "t have to say "Goodbye" to husbands and weetbeart , but can setrle down to normal lives again. )) )) ( ( ({ Tune h1elds writes from Florida ~ "the land of moonlight and romance" and mav. I add "wa rm weather"! She's having a marvelous time but assures u. that -he'll be seeing us soon. » )) (( {( Thi tends to be a bi t confu sing, but at the present wri ti n,g, ~Jfa rgaret Slon­eker and 1\1arian Hette ri ch have re­turned to -chool and Elva Sch ell and Irma Pater have returned to work with us. The above four a re "co-op" stu­dent and you never saw such comings and n-oing . )) )) (( {( ~Jain Office al o lost one of its fa v­orite member in the person of P earl Garver, Bill ing. who left us to take up the dutie of housewife and mother. Be t wi, h es to you and your adopted s n, Pearl, and do bring him in to see • us omettme. » » « « Freddy Robinson, Sale , is a very happy excited per on these days and for go d rea son. \V were all e cited nough with h r \hen he received a go rgeou ., orchid from S 'rg ant Robin­' On n their w ddin~ anniv ·r ary. but when later the ncv • am that Louie was on his way home for a \V II de. rv-d re ~ t aft r tl1irty-three mom! !-> in th South Pacific, we are all a-ditlJ · r. -----·------ Lady custon er i11 hoc store: "Of cour e, I vant th rn C(Jnt furta hle. l tit at the sams tirne ,/J()d lcH king "IHI a r­tractiv ." Clerk: "Y s, mad<t rn, I und .r1-.tarH.l - large i ide and small outsiclc.'' (l l) Corporal and Mrs. Alvin 0 . Weaver, 648 Haldimand A venue, who were married last July 15. Alvin is the son of Oscar Weaver, Coaters, and Mrs. Weaver is the daughter of Anna Ledington, No. 2 Sorting. Alvin is an instrument specialist and stationed with the 393rd Bomb Squadron at Andover Field, Utah. - ENTER MILITARY SERVICE Hamilton Champions who entered mil itary service in December \Vere: John Johnson, Jr. Edga r Smith Robert T incher, Merchant Marines P aul E. P ete rs _ faurice P . Carter Dewey T aylor Wm. Polla rd Adna Hicks Gerald B. Day . Howard D. Thompson, Nlaritime Service. Employees who entered mili ta ry er· vice during N vember were: \:Villard D. ~1 u llin s Robert Retherford Ea rl Farley Elmer Bra hear Everett Pi go- 'Tr. cy Sta mpcr Donald Schulz L ter Vanho k GREETINGS FROM LEYTE A abl of hri stm, · greetings I I i rhtcn.ed the h 111 of l kc fill er, 3+ L ckwo d Av nuc. h wa, {rom hi son, T' chnica l S ·rgc, nt R I ut l\1iller, for rn rl f Champion and now in L • }' t , Ph iIi p pi n s, • f t . r f m r y ( a r.· of s ·rvic '. A I rotber, ICy -!iller, is n gas trtiCh">. T hl' card read "~1 rry lui -una.' aml H, py New Y' r." ea s .- . ; By We.rle · "' obl; Thought for the month . .. "' February ha& it Jush~ and \';~ ind .. And cr·u i5 of rain, and snow; But my heart ~incr a I trudge a} . ng, For the be't i ~ ret t come, I kn \V, '' e Jlvc so that the rain of enduring i\Iake, s the promLe of j y more allu r- » ) « ( . .. \Val:i1.h in the baH-dark of arl da\vn, to he~r the bluebird · chirping dean and trong, \~a !kin throutZh d1e drvin-g de1Y, • • • ...... ,_, ... (,...r \Yitb the warm · pring ·un on m. ba k, the flu h of green in the tr e ~ . . .. . \ratching a kite ftoat through the coo! e·vening sb\ which enr t clip e L • all time with its perfect beauty). )) )) {( «' Head man Le Hightower s open hou ~ e et-togetber on ChrL tmas eve '- was enliYened b the pre ence . of Butch Hen, tecenth returned from two and one-half years on foreign s-oil, and the "pitch" playing cf Charley Reynolds, Hobe \Veaver, Bob \Veaver, and Le Hightm\rer himself. }) )) {( ({ . " Bronco' Johnny Stephenson has forged to the front as the best-dressed man in the Bun Pen. T11e "Jumping John ~' from Middletown, with his ward­~ obe given a shot in the arm by Yule­tide nifties, daily decks himself out in the kind of clothes that are definitely a "tip from Esq t:1ire". )) )} {{ ({' Silver-haired Charley Reynolds has been taking the bus to work on these . cold winter mornings. Say Charley, "There comes a time in the life ef ev­. ery young man ·when crossing the Black Strc:et bridge on a windy, zero · morning comes under the heading' of a maJ. or un d ena k· 'm g." • » )) {( « Time out ... As we m.ove into an­other year of "blood, and sweat , and tears", we pause to salute the heroe of the Bull Pen, all over the world, who are fighting to rnake the univ rse a bet­ter place in which to live: Lieutenant 1/fike Couzzi, a pris ner of war in er­many; Sergeant Lou M yer and Ser'­o- eant Corli s Drake and J ohn , chwab in EnqJand or Franc ; Li utenant Luther Peters in Germany; Al Staar- · rnan and Ken .l\1oserwith the ~yavy; 1Iarines Carl · Heuse and Lafe Kin ; ?~er ea11t Joe Crech and S rgeant Jim · I homp on, fresh from England and the Aleutian ; Lyman Brooks and • luzz t rret , in I~~ n l nd and h · · uth J a ifk~ Butch All n, l ck in th , U. S. aft' 1 g r ign rvi · ; 1 . r- •in r ce in fn r ff I n; ti · t nant F aul H in a tid tp , l ET m 'r ::"J w­kirk with the. ir F r s in Te as; L tl Rile:; .... rni~ Da· ids n· Ja · · Kansel · Dna ,routman· Doug 1 on! y; J t'ry :i\ le han· Ja k Jruss· Phi l Sing1 t n; Don Pierc . and D wcy Tayl r. ~la y w n V"r f r <et y u! 'D )) (( (( San 1.. - hair ·i '·Peachy' Beckt1 II ook: a -A · er · n ix pair of those work "O k \ivhi ·h ar Rllaranteed to remain -v,:hole nd " hol f ss'' for six month s. J\nd b eli ve it or not, four m·onths have pas .ed, and thy have yet to spring a 1-ak! Now th ere is one war time pro­duct that ri ·hly deserves a plug. )) >> (( (( rr~w o new youngsters h· ave J.O m. ed. our ranks in the past month-Paul "Ducky" Waddle, the boy with the big smile, and _George Brock, the lad whose name has a sturdy ring, and whose jaw is built along the lines of the "hard rock from down under". \Velcome. to the Kromekote Depart­ment, or Drum Coaters, or Bull Pen, whichever you pref-er. We hope that the big red door will be home to you for · a long time, and inay you always look forward to pushing it Qpen! )) » (( {( Hobe Weaver says tha't you never know what a bunch of dad-gummed li ars you war k with un:til the first zero day of the winter, and you hear tem­perature reports anywhere from 10 de­grees below to 8 degrees above. Then you recall what you told your neighbor that morning, and wonder if you aren't d1 e bi og€ t liar of them alL )) )) '(( '{( Home on that ·wonderful, long-dreamed- of furlough . . . · ' . S rgeant Joe Cree-ch, from Eno:hmd . .. J oe say that ·he mi ed hi. motor­cycle .more than an.y.th i:n,g J e during l1is t 'WO year ab roa i ... Say Joe, · "\Vhcr, those; 1\1. P .', came riding dorw n the road n their'" y .]e ", I ju st wi lted down" . . . Vv 0Ul beli v it, for Juc i the _ o . 1 nomination for th . tid of ' Th . ' yc1in' Kid" ... Scrg ant Jim , hon r-on, lookiPlg ~ vi u and dr 1:1. wn from a tou 1~1 . year in th . l utian . , . S y Jim, · Don' think that tb · :if a rin r the only 011 vvho make bea -b h ads. Th~ rmy o s ir for a lrtd f that . t o. ' And no one hould b1o better than you Jn. n.f · H2J Bu ·ch Hen ~ till the eni 1 apc:l 1iear ·y " t 1~ ', and ye , ir. sp ak­in ·. It ar · n r ther A uently . . . a y Butch, ' I w s m rt t b n some of . the boy , .. I go me a li .1e bo k an.d , t udi rl up,. ..p.d th n I went · ut and gc c juaiRt d" ... .1\1 • ta rma<fl; from Nor! lk) \ i rginia sttll old 100% n the Navy and look­in for ard to· ano her cruise ~ .. Li uteoan Paul Hein, lo king trim in hl.s , tniform, and a credit to the Air F · rceei; technical staff • . . Down in the coating mill , .. They say h" t the one thing smiling . Namon J obnsmt will never Live down is he rumor that he· once went to .a party, o so worked p over the gui ar play­er's strumming of "'Birmingham Jail'' that be gave him 3 dotlars, r~ached . over and grabbed him by bo h ears, and gave him a bi · kiss ... » » « « Cleaning and Buffing the Drum .. , Earl .Beyers has been living in hi new­ly purchased and newly furnished home now for two months~ and !ikino­it better every day ... Lots of luck1 . Earl ... "Big Stoop" Denny Wilson is still in the news by being the owner and driver of the "Old Faithful" Nlodel A formerly owned by your truly .. . After serving us for 90 years, getting itself stolen and stripped, and reas­sembled under Denny's skillful hand _ · -:-like Ole J\.1an River, it seems to gQ on forever ... Marv-in Hacker say that a lot of people do things· a though they were going to live their ivhole liv€s in the next year or two ... The . wise man wlll make · decisions with a long rang~ iew of the next 10 or 20 years ... Vie think you have ome- .t h·. 'm gth. e· re, "Kr etch urn " ... )) )) (( « P. S. \;\; e always heard th at a per­son was fill ed with a o-reat feeling of ecstasy upcn takin0 tbe o-r .at tep of bu ying his own hom . But so fa r, mn mind has been so cluttered with ru gs; measurement , window , and a thou·­and plans and counter plan. , that v e must pinch ourselves to see if th r i any " feeling" at alL Horace: lf you loy 1 me, v hy did ) ·urefuem at fir st ? 1:.-: dith : "Ju t t e what · u w ull do.' H rae · : t But. I mi ~ htt have ru. hed off without: ' aicing for an e. plan-a tion." Edith: 'Hard! ', I had the d. .or · I k 'a. '.,._'fypo G-raphi . • • F und ofil a Fre 'hrnan's :re tStr' ttoa ca rd ; Name { parents: "1.ifamma and Papa." • B-v Po~cer.l"\-' ,.. or THe L )(, alma ·t Jip­m tl j, im · and I han:·n 't. ime '' ite a nythinsz. A few ' L ( · e n ~·.: i 1 our depa rtment a re · till ·· ~-·i H . o ': J m re . \ lk a - ~ eltzcr · hr i · h adache: after the bt liday . )) )) cc (( \. u! ~J \ ·;u folk~ like to kn \V wh at . er· ne •·ut in our £cah-bao- thi .:: \"a r : • .... ... 4 I hi n · t' ·e --,·one ~ot what the"~: needed. ~ ' 1 e ··e i, t he !i:t: ( ;u1.r1er ._'mitb-a box of kit hen hl:' ·- he \·on't haYe to l orr ,,- am-· rhi le. F ra nk \' hipple--t\ sna kes-!\ on­er ,·bv: D ·r tl1\' Craio- a \::' . . remed \r for a r '" :; .y mormn ... . Cla;re \.CJ!fe-a bubble blO\"i·imr -er. ~ Llo' d Ha rv, rd- a holder fo r ci (T - - . c ·ct tes. . Jark Btner and R bert Rennie- ~ c -yo o u.::e in their, pa re time. Ruth Hen]e,. ·- a teethin.~.. rin g-,Yhv. "Cra! dma" : -J.;hn Fe'' - a babby. rattle. F r nk Cros:lev. - a cut-ou bo k and a a , SO to hano himself. mmie Barrett and H arold \Yri.z.. h t - ) ack;;. o · Bull Du rham Tobacco- :-o the - an learn to roll their ,wn. B ,b Hacker- :nake·-aQain T \VOn- '"' ( . \ b \-- ~ Rub,.- :'\eill- dominoe . Rt th ! u~u ~ pu r g:er-modelin ?" clay. 1. ~ her H ochenberger- a o-old ele- , r ;.an - 0 put on her farm. ..... arl Kehr- t ruck ca rryino- block . I ri · Ball- 5nake in a jar- an awfu l ,,,,, uf snake- were ~iven thi y ear. ~!iff Reker. - truck- to help him get ar t.I d the office fa ·ter. <, "ert Boyd- ring pitchinr,. :yame. ·arl Buehling- a ba of ).'!ail P ouch che\ ·ir tohaccn-- so he can hav" a o<:;d time. _ I n. · . Ia ·o. n- writin ta let-so he cr n nite more letter . E a in ,. \ Ierz- orne porta b1c .oap. Dick Be t - a pair of ear muffs. Fr n · T umr on--a o-reat big ci gar. P, Hlmmerle and Helen Powers­, JIJ m id' hope chest. H "]en ,\ ro-a rdine-a bottle (A hand } j . Pierc Lon - a puzzl - becau e he ,-,·1-- around \vith a puzzl d exp res­i . ul h' face. B ·tty Loh ide- a bo. o{ miniature u nJ a liul quirrel. I ." n wt had a pretty nic Chri t - ... • I -id ' rin \'e rything. The ot.he ni crht ob Hacker\ ·ent to L dQe \ \ ·i h Frank \Ybippl and l b decid ed he wa- goin home arly and he \·ent ut o the coat room t <>·et h i' hat a11d c x tt. and he cam· back in and t Jd frank that s meonc h::td walked ofT with hi : hat. Si nee Hacker couldn't 1lnd hi - ha t, he decided to tay awh il lo nger and play ,·ome five hundred . ,\ bout an hour later the boys , tarted . . g ing lHJm ~ . Sti ll Bob couldn't fi nd hi ~ hat. Frank went our with Hacker, 1•oi nt ed w a hat and told Bob that tht> re was hi · hat. B\.)h sa id ''n o, that \ras n't hi ;:: hat, but lo you know, Bob tri ed it on and it v\·av hi · hat. Hack­e r's excuse \ras that it didn't look like hi s hat at al l. Somebody ought to dye Hacke r' :-; ba t red so he can t ell it first thi n~ \·hen he look · for it. L )) )) (( (( l h<n e ju st time to w ri te a few more lines. Remember to help ou r boys out and t help them to get home sooner­bu.\ · more \Var Bonds . PVT. GLEN HOLDEN IN NAPLES P v t. Glen Hold en, a member of the Cham pion ' ·fa miLy' se rving in the a rmeJ forces, now is fi ghting his part c f the \' ar f rom behind a desk at a re­placement depot iD ~ap l e ~ , Italy. Pn. H old en, who \<Vas sent overseas in J anuary, .1 944 was a medic with an in fa mry d ivi ion until la t September, \rhen he suffered. severe hock and concu-=s ion from an exploding shell dur­in o- acti on in France. Aft er recove ring in a ho pital in 1taly, Holden was removed from com­bat duty and rea ssi n d to limited ser­vice. 1 n .a recent lette r to his wi fc , E th er H oluen , a form er Ch am! ion employee, H old en cncl o eel a number of interestin? snap hots taken in It aly ju ~ t b ·fore the in va · ion of , > 1th ern France la s.t Au ru , t . In addi tion to 1 arti ipa tina iu the inva ion of out bern Fra nce, ( ;)en als ) ~ a \ acti n at the Anzi< b ~ hh ad in Judy. \'hen h · l!r">t arriv d in Ita ly h · \>Vas li!-, tcd a. a riAem n, but later w a ~ tr:.t n-ferr J to the medical c rp . . "Pat} diJn't ycJu t ·li me that a bmlh­ ·r of yc ur i. a la\1\'yer ?'' "'IJ ' " I' d ]} J I , , ( If . r J' I - at. ; n l v- o a h d ca rr i · r ! Th · Q·c xl thin g. of lif a r . nut '<.jll<t lly uiv iu ·d, ar the ~" , 1(J, or," sa id P at. "P ur f ·llovv-m. ' brother uldn \ d , th i tu 14 v<.: hi , I ife." (13) On Saturday. September 23rd, Miss Irene Bradley and Stanley Corey were united in marriage in the First United Brethren Church, wjth the Reverend Emerson Bragg officiating. Mr.. and M.rs. Stanley Bradley. brother and sister-in-law of the bride. were the attendants. Following the ceremony a reception was held in the home of the Stanley Bradleys. on the Old Oxford Road. The happy couple are established in a charm­ing apartment at 324 N. Third Street. Mrs. Corey will continue with C M. Sorting. KILLED BY TAXICAB lVI rs. ?\Iaggi 1 [a ri R o~ son, 34, R . R. 8, emplu e i on .\I "a lender , was in sta ntl y killec.l \ cJn ·~day ui n-ht, D cember 20, \vh ·n t-he w a~ stru k by a ta.·ic::t b. Sh had ali t'> ht ,d frc m a cit y bus o ppo;; ite the ' 'cl ock hm1:c'' llo >r wh r · sb · r ' !)Ort ·d fc r d uly. ·wd was : tru ·k br t heca h a · sh · rJn behind the h us. Th · l ti S driver I " ~ ! cen he ld on :1 ·haq! l' of rn an slaughtL'l'. \1 r ~ . Rot-. ,.on J 'a,. ·,· her wi lower Lei - ' wa rd ; a su n, C lenn \ lc: F:1 :!Jen, H l1< n1J e: :l dew rhtc r, 'I r~ . Ed\ ard P rin ,_ c,a r, h ·r pa ren ts an l tin·· l rothus. - - - ----- -- --- c;ob: ' \'ha t i tha t .l( l lr ~l in~r noi: c ?" Sl1 c: " I'nt tryi ng : wa llow that line y u' rc hrov ing." • ea B\-' Wall.' Reed The rabbit p ·pulati( n ab u l\Iau - tm.,+n ha, take 1 a nev. lea eon Iif ~ ince \Yilburn Hale ani Ford Philpot t rt d huntin there. They wen ut ju::t l ·'­fore the ea on cl ·ed and after t t ­tlin the element ' all day c me l < n with nothin t 'h V.i but :vet f 't and tired bon :; and · r rnus le ·. Th ' payoff arne 1:-Yhen Hal br k hi · c:un to unload at the hou · and f und h . had ne{Tlected to 1 ad when th · · tart­ed out. .._ Ia -be he wa. fi uring n caring th m to death vYh kn \YS ? '-' Ted .... eeman belien~ · in corn:-r ·ino­ammunition lrhen he hunt . H g ts t\ili·o rabbits 'with one shell. ''The trick.' he m destlv ~ avs, "is to {let theffi' lined up right and. th n anybody hould ·be · able to do it.' Take note ali you hunter . » )} « « Some people lo"e money om.e lose friend ~ or job but lea\e it to Jack · Stewart to lose his car. Such was the excu ~e given l\'Irs. Stewart 1 hen Jack and Bud Dunlap were upposedly get-· ting the car out of the pa rking lot and failed to show up at home. \ell, Jack, \Vith uch an honest man a Bud to back you up, there could be no doubt about the truth of the story. )) )) {( (( Any one with an hour glass, sundial or good rooster, plea ~ e get in touch immediately wi h Bob Hay s. First his alarm dock found its way into the bath tub, the young hopefuls in the family thinking it would make a good Pf~ Aubrey 0 .. Parsley is stationed at Fort Jackson. South Carolina. His wife. Vera. C M Sorting, an.d two years old son. Ronny. are waiting for that time when he will be home wUb them aLl the time again. He has a brother. ilUe Pa.raley, Jr .• on C M Bewinder•· • bt at. Then hi ' ra ii . ( 11 ofT th an 1 n l hru •e int ma.ny pi r s. 1 n a ' n ) f. tru · but it i ' sL id ~ "org Li ·k ~ litt'r ' ·t8 .., ingin oVt'r the r li( t h tim and perhaJ his vibrant voic had ~ metbinu t 1. d with it. B< b, ther - f r , · n u · th ; loan f a tim ~ pi" e until h · l ·arn~ to t ~ll tim by h n r st r or until cl k gain ar · vai l-abl ·. )) )) tC (( Congratulati n t ) "P e-Wee" and 1 .frs. ,ollins · n the arrival of a !augh-t r, e _,mber 27, laren e Sandlin and family have m v d back after living for some tim e · in Franklin. They bought a home on Bonacker Avenue. Glad to see you back, Zeke, and wish you all happiness in ., ou r neYv home. )} )) (( (( The[e's a song that goes ''There' always fair weather when good fellows get together.'; But there are two fel­lows in the Boiler House to whom thi does not apply. . When they .get together, one winds up in the dog house, and the report is that one has been there so often he barks at passing cars. )} )> (( (( Every one was very happy to receive the generous Christmas bonus check · from Champion. After showing the check to his wife, the writer got off with enough of it to purchase a new work cap. Well, they say it is better to give than to receive, so I gue s it' nothing to grumble about. (Anyway, V\lally, what good would it do. Our wive o-et it all anyway.) )) }) (( (( The deadline bas crept ri erht up so I'IJ clo e with t his thought. "Don't do what I do but do what I tell y u to d. N£ake ou r New Year re olu­tion and oti.ck to it. Teaehcr: .,T(m ~ can ' u t ll me what a hypocrite is?', Tom: ·•y ., ; ma'am, It ' ~ a boy tlnt com · to s h ol with a mi l on hi, {a e:. A :ulu.m at dd with hi h:trcn , Thowrht f a way h" ould sc r m. He cau ht him a m u e Set it lo e i 11 the house Thu starting the fir t harem-scarem. (14) Art Ga.rcln.e.:r and his qra.nd.son. Docnald P. Davis. Jr., whose fa1he:r now is in th Navy. Mrs~ Davis formerly wor~ed in the mitl dwmq s.c:bool vacat:ions. 23 MORE RECEIVE BOOSTS BY "TIME SERVICE WAY" There were 22 more Champions \ ho receiveJ pay boosts duri:ng January due to the company policy of giving five percent boost at the be inni·ng of each new five vear of ervice. Four of th~se joined the 2 year clas and include Robert Lee York, who started work January 10, 1920; . tlarie Curlis, January 12 ; Floyd l\tlor­gan, January 27, and Murray Ramvey, January 29. Five yeat·s: Charles E. Hymer Ten years: Carl Schneider William Hardebeck Fifteen years: Victor Goodrich John L. Sebastian Donald C. Begley Violet V\T a.ite Bernard F. Schulte William Cope A. Edward Moore Ted Leffler Alic Franz Mary Gift James C. Purkey 'Vilburn Hal Edwa rd J. Iunnery Tw nty ar : vVayne Ro · Tame lVJint r • ANNIVERSARIES William D. Nfn.upin compl t l 3,. yea rs wid1 Champion 1 J antwry 15 and qui etly olr rv d the cv nt. S en San t Jius completed 30 y ars on Jan­uary 3. . R~ l pb Beiser compl t d hi . 20 , ea r,; vvith th company on January 26 nd Arthur Beiser 20 years on Janth ry 27. • . an B· J a11zes Pelley • ic. Bad·: Bill T hompson was home u lou h durin he holiday and ;e a e ~ y 1 ·e did not get to ee him. "Br e · ~ l\lay (Pea rl) al o wa ex- .....t ... d home in late J anuar , his wife ove:-, and ''Brot her' Earl ju t was. }) ))' (( {( C ri mas ha come and gone and e\·ery one in th e calender room had a o · ti e e cept the girl . The side­' · ·al'-- and treet h ave been blanketed Yi b a cou le of inches of ice and they can ha dl) get to tO\ n to do their ear­l.' exchangin<..-. \Ye n e-ver aw one who did · want to exchange \vhat she got , for ... omething else enera ly a usele s a~ he oriainal gift. )} )) (( (( All in the calender room -v ere ap­preciative of the C hri ~ tma aift from the company; It wa a real urpri e and plea ant to receive. )) }) (( « ne of tb.e girls walked up to a cer ­tain man and aid ' 'Give me a chew" and ina~much a he wa about to take • • • • I 10 a chew, he to]d her to open her mouth and when she did, ·he got about three finger fa popular crap in her mouth. Nmv he tell me he'll never be ur­prised again . )) )) ( ( ( ( Ora 1\!Ian ring and hi wife took their econd week' vacation between Christ­rna and N evv Year but when Ora told "fudae' L awrence Cummi.n he was oina to Fl rida, the "judge" volun­teered to have hi car o iled and grea - ed, furnish the ga for the trip and do the driving if Ora would get a tire for a pare. The Judge worried and fret­ted all week becau e Ora ' a n 't there to keep him straight. \li.Te did our best a we were pinchhitting for Ora on that shift, but couldn't keep the Judge dm n. \Ve were glad to see Ora back to save the judge from having a ner­vou breakdown. )) )) (( (( Mack (Lester l\1cintyre) after vatching Flora Lainhart raking around on the floor gave her an order for a u oans an roans-.-. Bv Clarence Soule "' \ralter \rVates i back on the job after pending orne t ime at home foi­lm\- incr an u nu ual accident. As he wa e ting into hi a utomobile one morning. hi foot lipped on the run­ni. n . board b reaking the wind hield, re ~ lting in injurina many ligaments in hi~ riO'ht arm. )) » ((' (( , ... e\·e been expecting Bob Peters to re21ale u \.Vitb quite a few of those f. mou h storie . He recently went on hi~ Yacation and aid he wa - going rend it ii hin . But where? The • we.ather wa n ear to zero, ice and sn w cove ·ed the otound and even the be t i e ioned fish would not ~ tart out ]n wea her like bar., even o plea e such an ardent admirer a Bob. J) )) (( (( Eunice Keck retu rned after a pleas-ant vi. h in the uth where he visit d er mot1Je r now in a \V~ C camp. )).)) ·(((( _ ne of the amu in ight of the last f ' week vva -.;:vatching Cy Youn leave be mill ith ice on the ground a~d a pair of handmade cr epers on 1 ,_ ~hoe . )) )) ·« C( Ro ert Leary came in t work a couple of hours late the other day and reported that if any one of the gang wanted a real thrill, they sh ould have been with him when his automobile went over a bank and into a field. There wa no damage except to hi s pocketbook and that ·happened when the gara e . man asked him for $10 for som.e extra pecial ervice, such a s toWlll )) }) (( (( We have bad plenty of i e and cold jn the la ·t few weeks but none of us ever thought it would be bad eno ugh to cau c Earl Smith to remark it was the wor t · ince he had l.ived on Stat R oute 4 for these many years. He . aid one of his 1200 und cows sli p­ped on the ic and fell but s uffered no ill effect . )) )} (( ( ( I. Bowlin was c nfinecl to his borne with illn ss. )J )) (( It The holiday sea n pa sed h re ·more quietly than 1n form F y ars but wi tl1 a rn.igh y good tine for all, at hat. ~1a n y of the old familiar fa e were ·one, but then, tou th re w r man· happy new CJn , on the job and in th, party. {15) Mrs. Ferd Wagner is the wife of Ferd H. Wagner, formerly of the Machine Room and now serving with the U. S. N~ry- stationed in California. Their two sons are Freddi·e and Dicky. Jake Wagner, Coaters, is the proud grand­father of the two boys, and Norma Curtis. C M Sorting, is the sister of Mr. Wagner. new broom so she could sweep in stead of scratch ing the steel floor with a broom handle. Flora didn't get the broom, becau e she was told the supply was " fresh out" so she would put some nails in the end of the broom handle and use raas to sweep. : )) )) {( (( Incidentally Flora gets a piece of pie d a ily for her lunch. vVhen we were on a late shift, she forgot to eat the pie and we got a phone call at 3 a. m. to eat the forgotten pastry and not let • 1t go to waste. )) )) (( (( H ere is our platitude for the month: " Selfishness i that d etest able vice which no one wi ll forgive in o th e rs and no one is without in himself.' -H. W. Beecher. The acc used had been dulv con vict­ed wh n h was prov d . on fu\·ther e i­den e that he had act uall b en in pri on at the t im th rim wa com­mitted. ''Why lidn't y u s y o ?'' d· mand I. th ju [O'e of the 1 rison "r. H\11.! ell , ' aid th ~ man ap lo eti all "J wa afraid f pr judi in the jury ag-:t in t me.' ' -.,.-.---------·~ • Sw~ ' t Yo mg Thin "' t( hand .. m off1 ·r; "What o· r r u unif r.m! \:Vhat branch { r~ r· you in ?" Officr: "I m auaval urg on."' ~S W '\JT OUI 'f'.h. 'l llg: ' ' 10 ) d n , OU do to , crtainl sp ~ia li z · <. n sma ll hin thes da . . " • Edward Mannion. Jr .. and Anna Mae Bon­field. were married September 28 at Fort Me- . Clellan when Edward was in army training which he completed about the first of the year. He is the grandson of Chester Mannion. turbine plant. TED HOME ON FURLOUGH Theodore 'andeliu formerly of the Lab., but nmr a petty fficer in the C a t Guard, pent a furlough in early January with hi · parents, \ I r. and \1r· . . v n andeliu . Ted who is a motor J1Jechanic fir t clas, ha een plenty of thi war· mi erie ince he nr ·t en­ten~<. l d c ·ervice. While here be vi it­ed many friend thrOU fThout til' mill. MRS. SARAH VOSS \lr ·. Sarah E. \ 'c) s, mother: of Hen­ry anJ Rc<rina \'o ., b thin Traffi·, died 'h ri ·tma night in her horne at Symmes Corner ju su1 rth < f Hamil-ton. followincr an illn of nwr • than two -y ars. She v.:as 80 v. ear. old. Sh J a .. ·eJ a\-~.·ay in tl1 sam~ hon1c in which :h' \'a. b(Jrn, the Jau rh cr of P ·tcr r chm anJ R · ina Hultzbcrg ·r. She abo !cay . an()thcr dawrhter, .\ l r. . Carrie Baile~·; a ~i.: t er, _ 1i ::.s arric .J Jhn. t< n, and thrc' grandchi ldr ·n. , ·a i I r: '· \ \' h o , l i et·d t hi ham ~ ' \ 'a itr•:.' : '·Th h f lid. ir." ':tilcJ r: '\Veil, ht? d rn d near mi ,.­eJ it. • u es 1 on war s Th' f,, 11 -l\ ill r II\!°C I iun d\ ' r l J 1 l \ ' t j II._ t l l 'll ;1 11111 U 11 ( 'd l ~ l h ' . tl ~- . , . ~l\ 1}1 IJl lli11 111J! ll t': L · · hin ~', l tll 'ri ·h , 'f,_-: .·111: ('- • • 1 inn t o ;-; t 1 ·n! 1 hc n ; ttl d I' n 'Ion t! 1i f l' n f ~ h l' 11 t n < • 2 · ;tl ( nt ' I 1 ' • r. l\. ~1 1 ht•J in' l'\ I irk. . ' ti ' Jl OL:J :.lJ'hi,·, I 0 : 'h,u1 ~ in ndr 1111 .1 b ·n · a 11m ·- d ll '. P nhcrt Re ·l. 'h ·rni n l J ui!Jinrr, 1 .~: lJ --a to cllt Jm ' 11 po ihility of er­r r \'hen ahng car' ()f : IJi! 'nl ·nt of ·Ia\· fn ll1 ,eon!ra. Edward lohnt;ou. C ;\ l 'l rimn1n. • :: Jdca tn k T~' cc ntainer I o· rd fr >m cr~_ in ' un ler hv. dr~ul i c in ~I 'J rim-ming l partment. \ "illiam ~[arv·in, Semi- oat, 'f,.): ~ hi Jd in -fr nt of . c1. ::V1a ·hi 11 • si?.e pre . c rlin S ·helL \1il lwright, $-: Stain­J es~ st ~cl in. tead of bras ·trai ner. n Coaten;. Leo v\ in kie r, ~o . 1 . fachinc Room. $10: Idea for greater ea ·c in putting in Saveall s. 0 is "'itt, ~o. 11 Beater , $20: Change tock box so that nail s, crew., etc., wi ll not get into J ordan. \'' illiam Stephenson, ~o. 1 Reels, $3: Change outside door at ~o . 28 Reel. • I . trT)IIt'l 1'~11 •fl. c J R,· ·I . ~1(): I rnpt r, · ·nwnt t 111 ·t hr .d ,,f ,,, n d11uhl · r i k 1Jf l rr 1 1 , 1· r n ·, 1. 2 R , ·1. \'illi ~trn Blr J\.11, El<'tllj,· ,hrJ. ,1: In tnll .til IH1 br ,, r·lluc•· it t'l( · r'l'll knii ~, • j ·!1 I Jii J ,,.J mrJt(r rn 1 '· [() la<'l1ir · R · ·1. Pr' t1m !'Ifni . ' r,. 2 Be 11 r . , ) : Cr \' ·r rrn ()IJf h ·nJ r,f (), ' Jlin rn<,to r in ·<J. 2 B ··•t ·r r J' n e 'a t ·r lin '. \laud · .h·pi·I, 1 .·r·rtln'. ~3: CJ, · ng • afcty 'l.f1fl ,i •n in (. J .·r,r - in!! Depa r m ·n . D · ·cy Rile} . . ·rni- ·, ; r. j;L { · r· -t. inch in. t ~ad r,[ 2 in ·h lin· frc·rn hl" ni 1:2 ra cn:cn up 1. 1 1rb . Joe Fli ck, \lilh\ ri<'h . ~3: Idea () rt down brcaka re ()f l cmrn~l :'l f)[l - ·(J. 2 and CrJatinu .\fill alendcr . . .\Iargaret (J borne. " l Fini hill''. 'f,3: Elevate ~t itchi n g m· hinc. 0 to Ker ·teincr. .'chedulinu. $3: Pi cture: of Champion En plo,·ee who have lo ·t their li ve::. in ~ en.·ice he fram-ed and permanen I~· hun alonl'.,id Honor Roll in Cafeteria. Gilford 1 1inor, A ~pha l Depar ment, 1>3 : n extra roll on back enJ of .. \ - phalt .:\1achine t keep paper :trai ht. By ((Beclcy Lou" . nother hale and hea rty welcome thi month to Al Reece and Odas Potts. Both fellows worked with us before thev v\·em in ervice. Glad to have vou back fellows . • )) )) (( (( • ' icc \VCather \Ve haven t been hav­ing. ~Tr. Bartl ett has decided to put ·kii on hi · car t c me to \' rk. That would be J pr ·try . i ht to :-:-e him · kiin !own Faton R ad hilL )) )) (( ({ Ther · , ecm tu h som ' nf u ·i n in AI IJ rrmann· ~ min l. II r~n Itt uf th ·alva.!e ro()m th' other l y nd l(Jck ·tl Tut n .r • nd Yuung in. .\I yb ~ .c w.,:, . ~ Ill o ttit ,. n:t the •ffc.:cts f t \.' I 3 L »> «« \ r h ) 4 r ' til ' t \' (J h u . i . l m t: n j n l h i 1 n ill . , i · · up . The ' D a \ · 1" b rot h c r ~ f t 1 m t h l: C h rn i . · l B u i 1 d i n .-T. An\' u ·t f ir thar "·hizze-, ~ "t y l • i~ urc to han: ll 1 '('f and 1 ee e camnutlatrec.J in i (16) :\li ght\' .mart fell \V \H~ have a r und here. It i~ told that John • Youn cr and Fr o:t nk Turner tric l to t one f tho c nice, "·arm nan· ccat. at • th ·torcroom. They. thou <rln the\' ~ . \·e re being ~ asst·cl out. . "o\', Frank, \' o u m i ~ h r a · w c 1l admit it like J . h n n y doe· . U>> ((C( '·Sho rt ,·" \.( od h·tJ two,. ·rr cnj(_)y~ ab le "' · k ~ D'r m hi:; \'a ~ :lti( 11. Ilis S( n. ~ f erie. \' ~I S home fr 11l u\·"r:-.eas. If an von • wants ro t , kc a nice I< ng w·dl · aud ncc<.L· c mpnny ju st t1sk D lt­w n tll g) :1 long·. l urillg t!Ht lon :ly icv '"'' 'J. th ·r \V' had. '' J) t" waiJ... c lt '' - rk fwm ,,-ay utll (111 1 . R . . -. I t's a ~r n 1 way t1 kc p lit. A .' H111'! ! ladv. walkt'd int< ·t st H. · ·m I lropped he r bag on th · counte r. "Cimrnl' , chi cl·cn," :-h :a i I. Crur ' r- " 1 o yutl wan no. pull t ~· ' Younu. Lad .· -·'Nl. [ \ auna C:ttrY • • lt. By Otto Reid l t ~· :t · 1 ee e . , ei m ~-\lien. fol­h e ·r i , < f Patt n' Third \ 1~· ,htluldn 't she l e proud . "t.: • )at on · .!randfather and • ,. r1at~r1al ~randfather \vcre '- • 1~r . )) ) « " r· ' I ethe fo ·J ( uh . the contami- • 1.! in 'uenc of < ll hunter") ha · .:. 11' h \,. ,-. of all fle:;b. He wa s hon- · ~ nd t urhful un il he began to hunt • · i ·1 R:-' \Ya. e: and .T am ~ \~atkin:. . . , · · d, ":. Em en· carrie.:: a bluff -o far • • • rromi.e ·andwiche~ from a ph a.:: - l ·. Three~ od men anJ true ~av the ' h ; ~lnt \'L taken but that Emerv • fi ·e a shot. )) )) « (( 'd "1~1. . fi • o- ea m~ 1 ·at : L1e monn nger ~ '-' . nd ha,·ing- \·rit move on ... u il your tear- \vash out a \'ord of ! . " Big John :\ I u IIi n p ron:'d the --a emen ·wh n he hooked hi finoer < . a 1ua ·t f black enamel and poured · ,,·wle quart n hi' head. Enamel - \'er only a spc.·cifi.ed number of _ u:t ·e fee , but I am informed John ~o ·ed rem~ rkab1y good ,.,-ith only one • a . \'irh hi. ::hirt and tic in the fur- .~- ce <H. ::crubbed complexion redder n ba_:hful toma o. John proved ... til tby piety nor wit can erase h< If 3. line." Omar Khayan v .. ·a ·orking hi jaw and pen f r ex- Cpl. C arl s White, Jr., fcrmerly of the Baler ti~)m. now a a.n APO out of San Francisco. A r. Beu ah. i in C M Clockhouae and a brot r·in·law, BuUord Vauc;hn, ia on C M Re - • erci.e.-I like ,g u.Y : lik· .T ohn ~ I ullin.- fellow ~ who have the knack of cha.n r-in cr the ric - in tv rcalitie .. Even thou rh they '' hitcwa.__h thcrn ·clve with black (. namel. r ohn will wonder how thi:; came to be printed only until h ce. ,,-ho wr te it. H e ha a rgu d f r years that Reid. with a pencil in hi paw, is a pmvcl' t > be reckoneJ with. He , ays R 'id can i1gure a fo lrr of -cheme tl1at \'( uld ekct a Repullican in th Solid S( uth- r \..;i,·e a Democrat enough '· ' nctYe to cam1 aign in th Eleventh, of rentu k\·. )) )) (( (( T aint re.·ponjbl for v·d1 at goe on thi: m nth-like a blooming idiot I dclit erarely expo ed a weak carca to anotl1er t la t of hilarity from the king f fable-, Paul ::\Iick, wh has just re­turned fr m Kentucky. He \Vent there to chain ,,·ildcats, you know, like tho e keeping children from school. Mick . a\.' S he \Y:llked them to school on Fri-day- no ats . They he wa lked the older bov: to school Saturdav and Sun- • • day-no cat . That oldest boy, being so far behind he had to go to school ~e\ en day-s a week, merely sta rted the tale ::o l1e cou ld qu it. vVith t his myth c. ·ploded, marbe the biogest myth ever perretrated will rega in the front page ncca:ionaily. \ e refer to the maj estic mudd! ·r-Herr Hitl er. \Ve enjoyed . 1 ick'. tale until he repo rted findino . c\·eral camouflaged fox holes, chock full of Republicans, namin o- Cliff T ib­bett.. T m \ llen, ~ 1ac Powell and Ott Reid-at that point I left, wonderino \·ho !lOt the vmr:t of the sece sion. There ,,. r the \vi ld cats-and t here wa , m ~ madder than a wet hen. )) )) ({ (( Our f!enial ld gent, Pop Kell y, rush-d the . ea on Christma week. He CJmc in tust d up pr·tty badly. vVell the ice \YAS terrible. \Vhat mad, Po1 a hcadlin ·r \Vas th fa l that 1 .l ipp_eJ and jolted hi an cstr ap-proxm1, 1 ly 48 hour.:; bcf >re the ic came. That i - a lla\'lcss pr diction on ~ hin<T tc con . Se i g thi - is b ·li v­mg, \ C JtJnt I p 1p C >min r U! in T• ebruary with a July !:>Un tan. fficc B()y: Sir, l thin y u ar want ·d on the 11h(;JW. B().s: T hink! \'hat mak · you think o: OfEce Bov: \V ll, ir, th · voic · n tb othtr 'tld said, " l - tltat yon, you old idiot? ' (17) forrest S. Day, 53. 137 Gordon Avenue. died in fort Hamilton Hospital on the fourth. follow­ing a long illness of a heart ailment. He ha:J been in the Carpenter Shop for near 20 years. He leaves his widow. Lucy; a son. Enos: a daughter, Mrs. Eula Galbreath, both of Hamil· ton ; his father, Thomas. Paris. Ky .. and three sisters and four brothers. MRS. NANNIE EMMERT l\Irs. Nannie Emmert, 43, died sud­denly of a hea rt attack in her home, 304 South B Street, on January 13th. She leaves her widow, John; a daugh­ter \fa ry An n ~ and a son, Lee • dwa rd. A b rother, Hansford Landrum, is in ~o. 2 Finish ing, and a si tcr -is lVIrs. am Colli er. There also is another brother Irvine Landrum . EARL HEDGES · Ea rl E. Hedges 40, 130 Hanover treet, di ed in Mercy Hospital, De­cember 2 1, aft er an illn ess of seven month s. H e 1 a es hi widow. Luella; t h re cl auo-htc rs, J a net, who is on C i\1 So rtin g, and Zit a l\.1arie and E ilce; a , e n, Charlc ; his pa rents, l\-[r. and . Irs. . L . H ·dg s, and a ·i t ·r, ::\ f rs. Hll rt nG ker. EARL HEDGES NOW PRISONER Pvt. E,rl IIeJ, , 'ha11pion, vd1 ha . be '11 in I ra ly form Jr: th. n a car, IJO\V is a pri~()) er f th C •rmans, his llH rh ·r, \ It s. r at II d ·s, 51 ) Bu'k­') e St r · ·t, ha, been notifi 'U hy the R ·d ( m .... s. Pt i ar Hed(J ·s fir t was \otmd l in lr aly anLl · ft r returnin )' t lut \ [ts rep(Jrt( i mi:sin . 1 J 'W · uf his Ci pture by th ( J -rman ' re Ji n·d th · ten'>ion ()f hi · fami ly and fri nds a:. nothin ha I b en h a. rd ·i nc cto­b r 17 'vhen be w • said to be mi:s in . Charles L. Shepard, S 2 c. is the son of Elta Ehapard, C M Cutters, and the brother of Eileen Shepard. C M Sorting, and Martin Shepard, No. 2 Machine Room. Pvt. Doris Cooper. formerly of Semi-Coat, is now with the 4th Ferrying Group, at Memphis, Tenn. She was at home for a three day period this month, and can't say enough for the WAC. en er By Bud Ebel Time to get your l1eadache pills, folks. Here it is February and you know what that mean . Time you are making out your income tax returns and oh, what a headache. )) )) {{ ({ Tom Jacobi picked a oo<.l time for his vacation, that is if you lil·e to ice skate. )) )) {( {( Any one 'iving- a party and really wantm some good mu ic, sec John 'c hobin.. l()hn bas one (Jf th · b. ·t tring orchc tra available and can ol<.l John play tl1at fiddle. \''hy, he puts Rubinoff to shame. )) ))(((( orning clown the stretch, vve find tho;;e t\(> r.ld lwt buwkrs, Cuy omp­t< JJ1 anJ Bdl Hamm, all ti ·d up wit It tl e ~a me ave rag . On· oft h~.:m i-. ·ure ~ in? to ra k; w nder \ hiclt it will be. )) 1) {( ( ( Bill R, (ran ay· h '· rr.:dly ~oincr to ave that do-re-me now. '.:m y u .... u ,- the reason? Yep that's it. no more hor cr cin . Forre t Tanne r i trying to aet his buddy, Gi ll Vlolke, to chew tobacco. Tanner ays it's chea per to chew than smoke, but Gill ays he j u t ca n't s c it that \vay. )) )) ({ {( Chick A -bill says that bit of adver­ti sin r we rrave him last month rea lly brought in the bu ines . H · , a , "T he only ba<.l fcatur ·, th y s em t ie e air their m n ·v at h me. I have thin s • tu sdl, not 1 1 aiv ~nvav." hi k a! o ' . ays tock is ettino low ·o bett r hurr). )t )) {( (( Bud 'r .1ycnft nnkc· ~:asy m n y \ 'h n it cc rn • to ho\ lin '· H is with the - r •dJ'tlli al Tt''lr1 ~w d {'\'l'!\' <Y:lf11 • the) II n '! j: Lkput. Bud 11:\U, lly come. up \irh hi··h l·ore, LOll. ·quenlly I be Jrl ITH. '. , )) Sn·m lib. \1 ':H l' , Berr Bakn nd 1 .!mer \on heeler, ju. t c. n't · •re on th wcath r. .\ ut II \ e h •ar in th m rnin r i rho tl r . ttJ • [ rcruinU'. • • n mor in, Elmer r orr d -6 e- { 8) P per k r Or am t'- T. 1'.. K r 1 l 1 . r • f d · l L m i I­tr, n 1•lltn · <'i\ ·d a 'hri t11 ctr f11 111 lohn \ml 1 1 ,n UJ· ·r·1 ·nJ~n 1 i tlw lr,htl (; dlr v ·~ .• Limi •d, ·~~,tJ,JHJ,r~tl \]j h\',·\ Jtt ntl;fll- 1" i11~ \l'f ~r, intt·re r. i m , o T lll, !.11• .. I() all pq · . !\ p~q· 'rtTJ'Ikn II·~ .. n\ o te lli br · \ (JrJI 1d rJl " b · m 1 • kl v , ·d 1 he n,, r r) Fa e h11· · mi ir1.n 11, h' f• ld. '· \ lu1 r ha vc Y< Jl' lrHlt' ;'' 1. P · er a ttl. "'1'1) l'ain adrrti ic1n hu·~" '' I r<lll a pn1• r rnill ()Jl < r h !"or rn~tny anti m<Jil}' a y ·a ·· The Saint. he turn ·d him r tlfl sharp 1\ nJ quickly to IcheJ a bell. C ()me 1. n, , t>a.J.u I ln c. ,.· an d ak· a "You've haJ enou ,h of h - - - .' harp, grecs, Bert 24 and l 28. . ·ow orne­body was wrong for af er checking they found the real temperature wa- 20. Elmer said it couldn't be him for he just bought a new thermc meter and paid $2.50 for it. » )) " « A few week back when \ ·e were havinrr all that ice and sno v, Harry Osterberaer stuck his head out the door to ee v·:hat the weather was. It happened to be raining and freezing a;; fa t as it came down. \Vhen someone remarked to Harrv. . what terrible weather, Harry calmly replied. "Yes. but it i: a warm rain. thou2'h." ' )) )} (( (( Poor little Hazel Chapin came in the other day. with that ~ tiff neck ag'- ain and he blame- it on the weather. )) ) ) (( ( They report to m that Jim Low .._·ot awfully tir J v\·alking ar und town one Ia .v , so an i<.lea suddenlv. truck him. H e walk d OY r to the curb. put a penny in the parking met r, nd t dmn1 on th bumper of Jn Jutom bile t: ntil his t im ran ut m the met r! Golly,and itwa a olddn)',t o~ )) )) (( « . :ew· has com th. t ur bu !Jy. F< r­r ·sL I ay, ba pa ·s · ! into life tcrnal. l'\o ,,.< r L: on · pr' s how much \ are goin, to mis, him, for h' was one s w ·II , m·. Il i , \ or I· is ft n i ~ h c l o I l ' a rry n at our \'cry hl':t in fond rt•membrl1n f him. In hi: m mor ', r wt ul l Iik t • del this !itt!~ v r : )ft •n, 1 arting paths recr s ·, Th u .. h \ kn \ · nut vdt ·rc r \ h n, 'o I ' not a .: d-bye,'' Let' ay 'Until we meet a ain.' n o cation~, • ·o e-The invocation effered at Old Timers Club dinner at Hamil- • o . _- · ember J.t., wa in the form of • pc•em. co 1posed by Hamilton :Lvfill _ anager Homer H. Latimer, and read by Kenneth Fai t, emplo) ment man­arrer. • lany Champions who are not d Timers ha\·e heard of the prayer and requested that it be printed in full in THE Loc. Here it is:) ear Lord . I am a man of years. :).1, • age is as a lust. \'\.·inter, f r ;: r . but kindlv. • • . \ nd from the wi dom gained Th · ughout these years, Tempered by '"'·inter' fro ts And prino-ti me' blithsome cheer~ I come o realize That Thee above, i-Ve have to thank, F r these, our many ble~ ~ ing , For the food ·which \'e partake, For each day on which we \vake, For the stars which hine o bright, For the glorious morning lio-ht, Fe-r the friends, \ho~e act endear For Thy presence. ever near, For the nigbt, \·hen day is done, For 10\ e from Thee and Thv dear • on. Dear Lord, '·e thank Thee. Dm. er: "Do you "erve crabs here?" \Vaiter: "\Ve erve duwn.'' • anyone; 1t • • em ca Ul • 1n AN ORCHID TO THlM ALL! Bv Trril ma Hamblin '..._peaking of orchiJ ", it 's hard to leci<..le ju st who should get our bouquet of them thi s m nt h- tl1 c re ar · so many people deserving of a wln lc tr;:trden f tbcm. To all those girl& vvho. e bu ,, band ::-~, sweethearts and b rother · are ov •rsca fighting f r their Iiv ·s and th life of thi \Vonde rfu l country f ours, to th s girls who ar · (roing on doir g th eir jobs just as efficiently as e\·er, helping whcr th 'Y can and keeping a anc \Vel! balanced attitude t owards the world so as to be ahle to b ·ttcr help their men '"'hen they do come hom ·,-to tbo ·e girls we han 1 our 'bouquet of orc hid ~ .' nd to tiH se girls to whom the dreaded war department tcleg ra111S have come '\Ve re~rl'T to inform you'-t > those rirls \Vlto have ~on e n hoping and bdi •vin ' in the ca c of those 'missing in action' and to those who J1 aVt: carried on when it s ·en1s t here w.-:L n()thing to carry on f r-to them a lso n e give our bou ru ct of ( rchi Is. And to those ~·eople c':ery\',:here who a rc doing what th y ca n to prese rve the American \ J)' t)f l if~ for the boy::< to ome back to, we say r -hicls to you'. '"You know. while this v:ar with its c. amples of hate5, greeds and ruthles, nes tend to tear down any and all illu · ions c nccrning the human race . . -t ill it is bringing >UL s much of the brave and the good in peopl •. It i: a .nstant. source of wonder to me how people can go on with their dnily ta k. . :mall and g r ~ at, hiding in side almo ·r unbeli evable burden . and worrie 'lnd still present a smiling face to the world. So many of my frie nd · are married to men in the now famous 82nd and IO l st Air­borne Divisi n , and each letter from th ese girl deserves to ao down in the an nals of hi st ry as exa mples of sheer cou rag . And these girls are no exceptions- everywhe re we see it. People truly are wonderfu l ! ''I hope you don't mind the little lecture. I don't o ften get senti­mental and when I do, I realize that I do it very badly, but every now and then, I am just overw helmed by a feeling of admiration for the human family and I want to shout it from the housetops." Pullman Passenger : "Can I get on . o. 204 before it start ?" P orter: "You '11 have to, madam." Notes from the Bleachers • Bv Tum Wells • C 1arlie Stephen- received a fine let­cr from our buddy, Curt Ponder, ~ mewhere down in the Pacific. He a reciate- the letter ~ he i receiving f r m the folk-: in tbe mill, gettin ix 1n nne w ek. He sav the mail rvic • • ,- of he be t and he i one ()f the mail c!er · ·. .. ama Clau . he sa id, l ad been i h h1m before Chri tma· and be ho ed he'd have time w get back t H mil :m. __ He aLo ent two ~0 yen 1 e::: m _ 1 money~ one to Charley and rJne to me. He ah; received th·· Ct' 1ber Lor. for" hich h wa. rrat f ul. ' - "illi · nne to<Jk a few day::. rAf be­e' ,e hi~ rm, J r1hn \'cb hc•me on fur­J ·t ~i to e tb baby, th · f1rst tim he L: en hi ofLprin . )) )) Cl Cl · i len ers al o ' re receiv d fr m . am e] Hen, ·ard and Bud Pieper. If } ou ' ant a nice tender rabbit see Bob Habev. He has sta r ed in the rabbit bu siness. Ce1 or hip fcJrbid puhlic< tion f <1ver -·a addre::-~:.- but urt Pond ·r ha · an APO, San Frat ci. co; and P f . Claude Bra hi r, an APO, . · cw York. The addr ·, c,f Pvt. Frederick \ . Pi e1 - cr i : . 1\' .. S 9, 4th . ir \Ving, F 1F, . 'IC.\S. _Ch_er_ry P(1in1, _ ·<Jrth Carolina . __,_ ________ BORN IN MERCY HOSPITAL Tc . 1r ~. Jam \ ri •Itt, )6 htii - \ il'\ /\ nue, < . <Jn, J :unc · 1 icl a I. T(J . 1 n. Rt ·ll Tab(JT-, 1 123 R() ~ A' enue, a dau ,.ht ·r, Jo Ftta. T \Ir,. Jarn •..;; ullin , 4 Ild v '\' \ efi ll{, . 'ew l\Tiami, a ,r)n, \ 'illi· t~l Thuma&. (19) Gordon C 1 tor • e a er · \~ould ym1 like to haYc a hand in chiseling ;ut th t 1mb-'ton for ~Hit­let. oerino-, Goebbel, and 1 oj ? \ ell, you can! Buy Bond, ! ) ))({({ Our machine r m p0 t. B b (FI· h) Gordon, after ·w r -ing \- rtim "' ith Ed a 1ter, wrot th foll win,_,: ''Bovs it \Hl.S awful, t eat hi ..;t c\', -! ' • He b 'rrO\·ing my te th , tb n a l- d for ' . a chew.)' ) (( '(( \ e jtL:t learned that a covi' n1 v her ja\Y +1. 0 time - a da;T. Dan French. Pearl LjttJ a nd \V bb L 1 plea ·e be ~ od to your r ·. C W~, hoY\:eveL a:re n t th only one, hat • moYe their ja:ws a lot. Durini the first world ,,-ar we, in meri a hew d 13,000,000 'WOrth of o-um annually. Today ~ve have _6 chewing 0 Um fac­tories turning out . 60,74 ,9 6 worth of product annually. A lot of chew­ing, eh? ,)) )J· (( « ~i e got a letter from that girl with the friendly smile, Ruby Cope who used to be our scale girl and novv is a Y~/ AC. he writes: "We had a lot of fun on the train, good eats,- we had · to pass through cars and cars of ser­vice men, which made us very unhap­py- to get to the diner. (Behave your­self Ruby.) I saw a snow capped mountain for the first time. Crossing the great Salt Lake was really a thrill. .!\1y ·work is not too intere ting but fun. I like the place now that I am here and know my job. It seems odd to see so many silver ·doH a rs. I have­n't seen any since I was quite small, if I ever was." Cal Skillman's friendly mile must be catching. AH the irls working in the Activities Building have ju st as big a smile for you when you see them on busine S; as Cal. has for you .when you drop in for a chat. The same thing happens to you when ym.1 dro in on Kenneth Faist. Kenneth and the g·irl , in his office and outer office alway give you a big smil . You feel that you are welcome. We Iik pe ple with a fri endly smile; we al .rays find hem · intelii gent. orne peopl find it hard to smile wh ile others do it easily e1nd almost c ntinual1y. A fri ndly s. i1 reveals a w· rm heart and a warm heart cannot barb r hates and nur grud es. Of cou rs , we can go through life with ut smiling ju · t a we can run a car without ga - if it i going down­hilL V. ( am to us) Kinner and Charlie ers ara e L7 rban are two . " •Jl p rsons tn kn , . ~111 pL yg the rui1 ar b a ntif ulJy and ~ha rli ', ·oi . i , pl .,a ~ :tnt to l h ~ ·a r. ·\' b ·lir · · th · bu s ould b ' in r ' di that i ~. if th y would talk us int join­ing with u1 on e-strin T fiddl '. , ))(((( "But h ,. , Il ea . now i 1 Eurc pe with the armed f 1rces . n1 y r a!Iz' his life a m bit i n t be . m -· :;t mj ll i n a ire. . h c , ·alu' )f the Jr nchma, in Cre c, ha been fi: d at ., , looo,ouo t 25 c nts. )) )) (( (( . ttemi n Cham~ ion s! The April Paper l\rl akers Para lc will b macle up cntirel r with wh pper told by yo u. If you ha v an unu ' ual sto ry, no matter · ho·w tall end it to J ay. Your name wi ll be oiv n under your story. Re­member, 1arch 3rd is the la t day to get it in for April. Come on every- <. body1 join tbe fun! » )) (( ({ vVe wrote this column, of all places, in our basement, and here is the rea s­on : Up to now we used an old Corona typewriter, arid, although we used the "Seek and you shall find" system (one finger) we could, after laying out our notes, dash off the column in about 30 minutes. Now we are in a .. mess! Our swell niece, Mrs. Lillian Abbott, gave us a beautiful Underwood typewriter for Christmas and after trying for sev­eral hours to write this column we found we had nothing presentable for the good editor. This beautiful Under­wood is not as good a speller as our old Corona. Vle could dash away on it without thi1:1king; but this machine does not even spell ·our name right.. Our little niece insi ts that 1 e give the old faithful Corona to the next old­iron- drive, atld we love tb kid o much we cant refu e her request. _ V.l e sta rted on the Und rwood and aft ( spoiling sev ral pie we I t I o e ' ith me very fane paper makers 1 n-guage; some that cnu g cl fri end, Baldy ooper, intoned on 11 many y ar . a o. Our o-o . d wife, appa r ntly did n 1t Jik our langua o- f r she vvent a fter u 1 'ith h broom. , o, n1 '"' w are down in the bas . ment ' 'iLh th tlo s hal merino a' ay, determined t master th i ne·w me ~hi ne. Her Viie g , folks, n th t w Cnder.w J l: • La e fl sh ! rt \.Yi Is ;n ju t am i n to h 9 fi c3 , t h r ' w 70 a · i n , I a r- nap.- I.t - # J .I After Fr, nk Hixon wa :~. thwu oh at­in hi ' lunch a the af t ri~ one of th b y u ·he a ci o-arette and match- {20) '. nv ·r t) him. Franl· put the ~ig­n rett · in hi· muulh. t ok th ~ matche , l(Job:J at th ~m fcJr a m nn ·n t then hand, l them b, ck safing: "'Yo I can't ft.nl me, h , e matdH~s explc;Jq "·hen · vr•u str1 · · th ·m. 1 will u e mv own 'r1 ·a che .' S -~- ing-, Frank to.Jk out his mJ tch · lit the cigarette-to k a IJOU draw-and-B n - the ciO'aret e xp k;~l 'li imc1 a hundred picc.es, ·< 1oral nf thts story; If anybndy g1ve. you a cigarett · Lh sc day ' it i either Ioaded or he i · nu s. l\'fa rty Shepard's brother; at home em furl(>U rh ~ brrnJ' ht him a pack of J apa 1e. e ciga ret e · from Saipan . ... 1Iar­ty gave us one. They arc the arne len(rtl1 as ours but only half as hick \Vho vcr it was that called ci rarettes "coffin nails" mu -t have been thinking of J apanese ci •arettes. J ason Ri chard on told Jim Che- nu that th e best way to clean a chimney is to ret a couple of Kentucky screech­owls and let them fly thron h the ch imney. \Vhile Jim was down in Kentu cky on his vacation he saw a couple of screech owls and, remember­ina Jason's advise, brought them home with him. On the first clear day, Jim took the owls to the fire-place, pu hed them up the chimney and let o. To Jim's surpri e the owls flew up half way and then came down, out of the fire-place and into his nice parlor. vVe can't tell you what Jim said when he saw the wall paper all smeared with soot. It took Jim t1~1 0 hours to catch the owls and hvo days to clean the wall paper. Jim ays never agai-n. If we had to we in the electric chair tonight and the warden \ ould ask u, what we wanted for our la t meal, we would say without hesitation: Cream­ed chicken, Champion Cafeteria style! Should the warden ~ a ·we hav no chicken but y. ou can have turkey. and all tbat o- e with it we would ay: NO! If vL can't hav cr me i hick­en, Champion styl , we 1:-vant Beefhea rt ·1s th v "' erve it at our afeteria. Ye, , ir ! The ' ladie at ur af .tria ur can c ok! E en the 1 wly h a~ h, ·in the hand , of our well ook ', be me· a dish f r a gourm .t. And fr m the bi p rtion th se od v o- tabl s w g f r 5¢ and th ni · nd 0' rl meat "" get for 10¢ a r ing, . ou would not thin l? w' 'trc a nation t war. Our n ph with th arm d for in h aly ' pcut a [ w c.h ·~ fbi , fu rloubb in Rome. H e pai I $ 1.12 for tv;n fried ~go- and a small pi e of bread. For lunch h 1 aid $4."5. He ;vrit ' ' : It \i\·a n enou h to -f-i ll a small plate a.nd nc ff ith t." In hin 1 t.h y pcty $3.0 f r .a dl ... h f i r "<'rll and $2.50 for a o·lass of mille Y e , fri .nd ,, we o-ot ometbin cr in our Caf t ria! • • By Lorraine Stewart and Alberta Y ou1tg I rodu~i1 .... - the t \~ new reporte s ,JuV T' ine ewar and Alberta Young • ·0. ~ fan and Count. ,;tho axe takin { \: er he dn · e of he p ·e -iou reporter \Jildred \YaUen . who i ~ay in cr at ·h me ·to perform the dutie.o of hou., e­wife and mo ·her. \Ye hope we do a : od as he did in her writeup each mo. th. » )} {( cc \Yho Can Top This One :. It seem:- th.a the local paper is nam­in m.anv vouno- mother who have '- . ... , on:- in the _, erv:ice, but we think we _ ha ·e the youngest in Fan and Count. ,.ir. 1\!artha Grote, \i\"ho i - 34 year old . ha- a son who ha been in the )l.arine Corps for 1 months and is now en·ino- over eas. Hi, name is PFC :\el on D. lVIerrill who oon will be 19 vear old. l\t1artha is out for • c<'m_pecition in this fact. and we ha e F-e-en the birth certificate to prove the fact. )) )} (f (( Tho e who have recently taken their . vacatioo~ are: John Hen ley, No. 2 Fjni ~11ino: : Truman ~ <foore. Fan and ' ' - Count; Ada Azell '"·ho spent two 'n~-Bks in 1 rew Orlean and wa ill a ·week more. Gue~ that outhern clim­ate doe n t ao-ree with her. How about i , Ada. \Vhat' thi~ new ~ going around about Carl (Beans) Hoehn Trimmer ~, shoot­i- o- ~o pheasants at one huntino-. That s oae for Ri p,ley; do you think he ':vill ·'belie e i or not.' A dollar if thi swry. is true. There till cJaims to be . . a better rnark man in Finishing. Can :au rrue ~ who he i ? Why it' none .. ther han '·Butch'' _ fanrin: · Cham­pion ·. own phea ant hunter. Confi­demia11y, how many Butch? )} ')) « ({ There are Etu ire a few wolves in mu department. \Vander from whom th y have been takjno- whistling le~sons·. v·ould it be worth 'while to find out? "Your 'Ues~ i a .g... ood as ours. There are ~ev-era l irl.s in our depart­men .vho ha,7e l5rother who ha e re...: cdved tHe P.:urple Heart for ounds ·'tdlerecl iB_ action. ~-fa1.-y Jone , Fs:n and Co n , h a brother now in hos­rital1 \Vh V\a wmmded jn France. Lura mith Sortincr. ha a brother, Pfc. L. B. mi tlJ ~ ho ha been mi ~s ing , ince .. epten1ber 23 but recently got word he i a prisoner o{ war· hi -ister rece-i ed the Purple Heart for ~ ounds he . uff~ered in France. Lorraine Stew-art ha two brother., 0 car. form r1 of the Humidity Room ' . (D c Hou.7e) , ·and Fred Ste\vart, for-merlv. of To. 2 Trimmer . who recentlv' met in London after bemg separated fo r a year and a half. The reunion mu t have been a grand and enjoyable one for they spent four days touri ng the heart of London, their letters re­vealed. Another brother, Clyde, 18, ·will enter ~ervice in February follow­ina- hi graduation from Hamilton High chool. , ,, )> (( (( Berdie Carter's son, l\1orris, will en­ter ~ ervice in February. Good luck lVIorris. )) )) ·(( (( Pego-y Junkin, Sorting, has returned after visiting he1- husband, stationed at a New York City naval base ... Sally Campbell's husband spent his furl ough at home with her, he's at Fort Sill ... \Ve uess everyope knows by now who the new bride on the sorting line will be for have you ee that beautiful big diamond; congratulations, Dot . . . Helen Gill, Sorting, is with her husband for an indefinite stay at Camp Houser, Te, a . )) )) (( (( Several new girls ·have been added to the Sot~ting Line of Mabel Bishop. Tbey . are Laura P a rker, Viola "Ni orris, ~!lary Bennett and E. Jane Lawson. \Velccme, girls, we a re glad to have you w-ith us. )~ )) (( (( . M rs. Anne Richter's daught · r, Betty, has joined the WACS and .is stationed at Fort Des· 1oines, Iowa, for basic . . trammg. }). )) (( ·<C On.e for the Books: Be alert .. ,.irls Grab yeu r coats ahd run ~:Vhen.Charlie blow th _five t All the gu . , have fm1) \'~' atchi .n :u fight to get in line, Hopin \Ve all get ut ali ve. . ))))(~(~ five · ' \V'euding b Jls will soon be ringing (21) . . Yes, there's a resemblanee, and a stronq one. Steve Jones, No. 1 Machine Boom, and his so.n, Earl, same department. . .. for a certain party on the Trimmers. vVe are sure every one knows who he i , Harlan lVIiUer, who is engao-ed to I abelle Combs, formerly of No. 2 Cut­ters. Good luck! )) » ({ ;« Congratulations, Russell Tabor: a daughter born to l\1rs. Tabor in Mercy Hospital, December 5. Russ is on an embossing machine. )) )) (( « We hope all of you have enjoyed our fir st report and may the rest of_ them be still more interesting as the months go by. Signing off until next time, your two giggling reporters, Queenie and Bertie .. )) . )) (( (( • Mistress-Did you have company last night, Sarah? Housemaid-Only my Aunt Jane, Ma'am. 1\II.istress-H'm, when you see her again, will you tell her she left her to­bacco pouch here. , PHILIP DAVIS MISSING Mrs. 1vhry Burg Davis, 1\!Iachine Shop Office, was n ti f1 d in late Decem­ber that h r hu sband, Phil-ip Davis, el ctrici.an's mate, fir t cia s, was mi s­ing in a tion. He wa -on a submarine wh1 ··h had not r ~p rted for som ti.me. !fat Davis had b en in the P aciftc war zo:ne for tb ree year . e .. ' ept fnr · very brief furl ough~. It was on one of th $ - infrequent t rir s home that he and th then 1\![i s Burg were united in marriage last l[ar :h in Omaha, Neb, Hi-s h n"l' was in Corpu Christi, T ·xas} bu~ h ff q uently had vi ited in Ha.milton and was 11 nown h r.. • - , • Ailer more than 29 months in four zones of warfare. Ernest Allen. PFC, formerly of Krome­kote. has just completed his first furlough and spent some of his time with his old buddies in the mill. Ernest wears four stars for the engagements which led lo American advances. These in­cluded the Near East. North Africa. Sicily and Italy. He carries several leHers in which his units of supply have been highly praised, but Ernie is too modest to talk ab0ut them. He entered service on May 25. 1942. JAMES M. COLLOPY KILLED WHILE IN FRENCH BATTLE James ~1. Collopy~ T/5, son of Pat­rick Collopy, C _\;f Reels, and l\tlrs. CoHopy, 616 Prytania Avenue, was killed in action in France on Decem­ber 2 according to messages received here in late December. He was 27 years old and in the infantry. " keets," a · he was popularly known, also ha. tv.m uncles in Champion­Eugene, C aters, and Con, Pi pe Shop. He wa. graduated from Hamilton Catholic High School and was quart r­back on the football team. He al o was active in basketball and ba, cba II. He a~tended both 1-1iami niver i ty and Ohw • tate and at the time h n­tcred se rvice in July, 1943, wa a time tudy nnincer with the General Tir and Rubber Company, \!abash, Ind. He also leaves a brother Lieutenant Richard Collopy, in the 'Philippin s, f?rrnerly o~ cale ; a sister, 11rs. Jane Klapper; h1 grandparent , , 1r . .. 1ar­aarct Collopy and l\1r. and ivi r~. Peter Brm ·n. oom--- IT()/ ()I I I;, Dr\'~ s-h ' DRJf f'ht.' \ r .hinc R om wa . w ·11 r - Ill c m h · r ·J \.it h h t i "t m a. ~ r · tin frPJll (\II bo. tn th dim J . T 'iCC, (I hnpt' ·a h nf u r rn ·ml r d th m ~ : '' e II. ) \ m n. t l tn 1.1 " tt , I a r d w · frnm : o-t. Hir m c~unpb II. Thi wa: a horne ma c:11 d. ve arti ti · nd mailed fr nn Lcyt in ~he Philippine . .\n ther -1 ·vcr card am from Major -,cne I en nett from He nolul1. Th Semi- oat epa rtment made a ten ~trik \hen they eceived a era of mi. ed fruit from ·!arvin Hayes, ' ho is at "'amp Parks, Calif. Many thank , ·'~ "·ceth an,'. "Roundhead" Blevins .·ent in hi ~ err etings from somewhere in the Pa ific '"-'here he has been for a year. • )) )) cc (( Reece 'Paddl efoot" Langworthy, a former beater engineer, was home 0n a much! deserved furlough of 30 days after spending 17 months in the Pacific. Eleven of these months were spent on BougainviHe ·with the Marines. For nine months he never saw a woman. )) )) (( (( Jim Stephenson is nm;v in White Water Department. Jim received a medical di scharge from the army and is back to his first love ... Joe Sanders . is now a proud papa. The cigars were rather sca rce but this was not Joe's fault. Congratulations ... It happens only once in a life time, Leo vVinkler bought eight soft drinks at one time for a group in the Machine Room. If you draw a small number, \Vink, you must buy. )) )) (( (( Now for a small bit of bowl ing new . Hamilton's most promising bowl(lr crashes through with a big 106. Guess -v ·ho? ~o? A cle\·-thi bow·ler is the wolf of the · emi-Coat Department. Sp cdy Utter fina lly ha E. J nrs con­vinced he can bowl over 400 in three ram s. A bottle of orange and two gla se of ice water did the trick. The Champion bowling tournc will be oyer bv the tim you read thi but • • we'll wag ·r th \1achin' R >Dl ,get its bar of priz m ncy. Tf , collect ion wer ta k n to buv ou ' a hair ut, \ ( ul y u throw th mon in an ~,11 Y~ giv it to the S lva tion i\ r my, r g t a h a i r u t ? \' k n en\' one man who "Ot h.: ir ut nd an­other who r vc monC\' t. the • (I tion ' • • rmv. . om one 1 \ r n!' !. )) )) I ~xerctt :\1 or,. 'o. 6. cam in \i h (22) ' a ou enir a 11 in en him fn)m F1 ante, zi fla captured fr m om· '·nnan h :tdquar cr . It call ed 111ite • hi r1f cr> ment. J Clh n R, rn ~ ' I' n hi- h i m s vr. • 1 ion nn hi farm in (J ·orgia and \ uppo. · l · f1>und h. r bbit ith t h c p · k rm j t b · c k . . . E · rl Jon e wa · in g(Jod Yf ice during the holiday . ... If you are ha\'inr tr JU . le wi h water p 1mp., we can rec<~ mmend cur gen ral . upcrintenden . \Ve are in doub abou hi.-., i em but it was reported by wo cou · in the !\,1achinc Rcom. lt cems that during the f<1CCOt icy pell, () 1 r former ni rht • uperintendent fell under his autom - bile and had to be deflated bef0re he could be remuved. It sounds like the storie that Campbell '·ould tell. » » f( « Late Flash-Our little \Villie Nlar­vin has passed his pre-induction and it looks like this i it. \ ould ~!ullin like to drill Willie ? » J) « f( Our concert piani t, ~lr. Brecht, played for the Victory Canteen _ Iin­strel at the Hamilton High School audi­torium. Paul has been giving a lot of his time to the Canteen and urely de­serves a big hand. Nice going, Paul. )) )) ({ C( You have heard about the Big Inch pipe line, but I'll bet you ne\'er heard about the pipe line that run from John Young's farm to No. 8. Can you auess the liquid that i pumped throuah it? )) )) « « It su re is a break for Jay that he i an old man. Our parent taught u always to re pect old age but we some­time vv nder if there should not be • some except1ons. IN ORDNANCE MAINTENANCE ~\r m y Public Rcbti ns Departmen t is nn )Un ci ng tl1at Am s Davis. Chamrion when he enterr-! the en·ice, is now a Te ·hni ian , Fifth Crad , and sta tion 'd sine· j t.mc, 19-t-4, on ~ \ Ca I doni ' t , wh rc h is a membe r of thl: rdrwnce Heavy bint 'nan e • mpa ny. If " nt r ·J ~c rvi -e 1\ ugust 1942. His special jub is rh · in s p~c­ti n and rera ir of all typ cs of \' 'ap ns us d bv. n ri an in( ntr ·men. He r cently wa , a" a r l ·d the Good Con-duct ~J eda l. A brother, J. me · I a\'i~ • i with th' ombat Engiw· e r ~ in France. • e w s----------------- By Virginia Hale Lo of new . ha~ I a"'.-.""!d b), s ince Li ttLe Bit ( n11me given te \f,irginia ou have heard from u , but ;we ti ll Bi ttinger) r ece.ived a Xmas ca rd a few a e ali -e and kicki ng. day after Christmas. It ·was uch a joke to her that she .lal:lohed and laugh­ed. F o r her birthday January 4, s ~ e recei ed everythm.g from· Xmas cards, Get \Veil ca rd , Sympathy cards \Ved­ding ca rd- a ndJas t bt!t not ~eas tB!rt~ ­d ay ca rds. Seems hk.e Ltttle Bit ts sure get ting t he works. But never mind. her turn will come. Ole Dan Cupid has been around, and our Do oth Hale is ROW ~1rs. Otto ~ ·u ne1 .'. ~Ve want to wi"sh you aH th<l hap ine~ that i . in tore, Dorothy. )) )({(( 1 \·o of our co-:workers have left Champion. T hey a re J eari Heitfi eld and ammy Spadafora. Seem like we don't have anyon.e to kid since J eanie eft. \11e wa nt you two to know that we have mis.,ed you since you \'\rent » .)) (( « \Ye ·wa·nt to welcome Dorothy J one o tbe Accounting Department. ) ) )) (( (( Vacation time is always a nice time . . . when . ou can enjoy it. B ut just ima i.ne pending you r vaca tion doctor­ing a -ore knee and head (*). T he other night .l'V.Iar~ H oe! and Millie Bor­ger on went on a little escapade and ou the way home l\1ary feU on the ice. v 'hat had you gi rls been drinking, or wa it a race, and ~bry got the w-orst end of the deal? PATIENTS IN MERCY HO.SPITAL The following Champions or mem­ber of the~ r fam.ilie were recent pa­tient · i:n ~fet·cy Hospita l: Carl McElfresh, 809 Vine Street; \ 'illie 1Vfae Lee, wife of Ona Lee, 1147 Franklin treet; 1v1rs. Audrey Mick ife of Martin Mick, R. R. 2; "tvfr s. G ady · Back, wife of Charles Back, R . R. 8 : Mrs. H arriet Fi h.. wife of \V. J. F! .h 103 North C Stre~t ; James T avk>r. 9. on of 1\!Ir. and Mrs. Delbert T a}dor' Ea t End Station; 1VIrs. Clara Baker v ife of Georae Baker, 704 Lib-tty Ave·nue; \Villiam C. Rose 5 56 ~ 1ain · t reet; M r s. R.etill1a \Vater s, wife of Thoma Waters, 1120 Garden _ enu.e; Harry, 11, and OpaLHughe , 12, ~on and daughter of }...1r. and Mrs. \ illiam Hughes, R . R. 4 ; Robert Mar­vin on of 1.1r. and I\1rs. \Villiam Mar-tin, 45 Laurel Ave,nue ; N[r . Rena Rhodu , wtfe ot George Rhodus, 103 l ~onh C Street; Barbara Flick, 1036 Greenwood Avenue ; Nlrs. Marie Wil­hel~, wife of Joh n \Vilhelm1 Oxford; David Clear . l 4, son of "N1r. and I\!lrs. · herman Clear, 844 Millikin Stntet; ~ fr . Ma very Gadd, wife of Lewis Gadd, 531 Franklin Street. ' )) )) (( (( If by chance anyone notices that the cost <iepartment is d isplay ino red hair and pu r{')le swea ters, ask R. G. K. about the ch ange of scenery. })" }) (( {( Clarabelle Plall sure does know how tG play card . Any one who wishes to learn the game of ROOK, see Clara­bell e. )) )) (( {( Some of the men just couldl) 't un­derstand why some of the girls like to go t0 tbe fortune tellers, hlntil they v~' e re let in on a dark secret. Sh ! It couldn't be silly now . that you guys have found out, or is it? · JESSE R. BOOTH Jes se R. Booth, fatFier of Howard Booth, Machine Shop, and father-in­law of Charl€s TervehR, Mails, died Christmas day at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Tervehn, 951 Sot1th T hi rteeRth · Street. He was 87 years old and had lived most of his life in Hamilton and Seven Mile, being takeR . to the T.ervehn hol'lle jHst a week be­fore he died. He was _born on a canal boat, oper­ated by b1s father OE. the old Miatni and Erie Ca1:1a1, November 13, 1857. He h_ad . been employed at Ge-neral M~chmery for 47 years prior to his retirement seven years ago. He al so leaves fiis widow, Eli'zabeth; another son, Cullen, and another da ~ghter, Mrs. Th0mas Knox, Seven M1le. 1\{r. Booth had the di stinction of be­ing a member of Hamilton. Lodge No. 17, I.O.O.F., for 66 years. Jynk Man: Any old beer bottles you ~d like to sell, 1ady? Old Maid: Do I look as th ough I drank beer? · Junk Man: Any vinegar bottles you'd like to sell? (23) James Swanner. riqbt, No. 2 Rewinders. and Miss Helen Mullins. also o.f No. 2 Rewinders, who were inarri~d by the Rev. John S. Brink­man on Nove,mber 6. They have taken up their · residence at 217 Park A venue. On the left are Mr. and Mrs. Rey Hollister. ' Girl Friend: "M v little brother will •. .I . tell if he sees you kissing me." Young Man: "But I'm not ki ssing y~ ou. " . . Girl Friend: "vVell, I thought I'd tell you anyway."-Typo Graphic. The time to take advantage of the future is toda .y .-Selected. . . IN THE' PUBLIC SERVICE During recent weeks many Ham­ilton Champions have been honored . . Sc tt Zoller was chos . n a dire tor and vice-pn: ident of the Chamber of Commerce an l treasur r of the Kiwanis Club; Cal Skillman w a ~ elected · vi ce-pre i lent of the Board of E ducation; \iVilliam Creagmil was h sen pre: i.d e11t of the Kiwanis Club, and Andy And r on and Sani ~Is~1: wor~ name 1, r p· ti veJy; ~tVl SJ O~ maJor a11d as oc'i ate major m the Y.lVLC.A . campaign for funds t0 rua. intain. n n- If ustaining d e­R artm~mts. I ~------------~---- -- ----~------------------ --~ ---·· -- --~------- --- ---------------------~----~ CHAMPION OLD TIMERS MEET'ING More Than: 270 Memb· rs At Tenth Anniversary . Glancing vvith prid ovt>r th 'ir r - upeCb \·e inductria.J trails \Vhich ' \' r b twe n nd ,·ear, f rontinu u ~ Champion s rvjce, m re than ... 0 members of the hampi n Old Timer Club pledged their continu d lo alt and cooperation to th Char-npion cause as they enjo-.red their 1Oth an­nual banquet in th Champion Y. I\'f. C. \. gyrnna ium hete Saturday ven­ing January 6 ' at 6:J0 o' lo k, v;'ith Reuben B. Robertson, e.s: uciv Yi - ' president and founder of the lub, a ho:-t, eldom, if ever, ha e Champion 01d Timers displa ed uch enthu~iasm at an annual banquet a was evidenced on thi-s occa~ion ·which w a~ featured by unquestionably the m.o t att ractive ·musical procrram yet offered club mem­bers. OJd Timer~ were enthused also over the outward signs of devotion reg­istered by . 1r. Robertson as he del i v~ ered his annual message to the '1boys" wi.th whom he ha · labored since Cha-m­pion fir t started operations in this area more than 39 years ago. Through the entire program was woven a web of cooperation and good-fellowship and decorations were in keeping with the spirit ·which predorninated the banquet. . Meeting Was Colorful The banquet wa colorful from be­ginning to end and many Old Timers openly expressed themselve to the ef­fect it wa the most successful-event of its kind ever conducted locally. Weav­er Sorrells, as istant superintendent of the bookmill n1anu.facturing area, gave the invocation, which wa followed by the banquet hour featuring wast tur­key and all nece sary accessorie pre­pared under the general . upervi i n of Mr . Ben Grube. Mrs. 1rube has prepared all meals for the Old Tim . rs Club ince it wan organized h r 10 year.s a ro and ba ' arri d out her part f the pro,rram with marked . ucce s. Mrs. Grube wa a isted in the servino­by member of th Hillbili . girl nd t~e Floradora girls mu ical arrgrega­tt ns whose numb rs were re eived with unu ual enthusias1n during the program. 1\ij ' F, thryn Hu ·gilJ , . th nta rnu­si ian, a a.in played a .rnai r r I· in th mu · j ·d pr ·rram during the b· aqttet h lH \ i th her old tim v · al numbers sung t h c mpanim nt f her a - cord1an. H r f atur wa a sort f "all n:.qu st' pr rrnun wbi h hiably pleased Old Timers. Heaton Guest Speaker \.\ ith G. \¥alter Phillips, editor of THE Loc oF CaAM:PION AcTivnm and dire tor of welfare for the ce>mpany, as t a ·tmas ter the program swung into definite action when Mr. Rqbertson cleverly introduced the Rev. Dr. The Old Timers' Birthday Cake George D. Heaton, pastor of the Myers Park :Baptist Church, Charlotte, guest peaker, who highly lauded the spirit behind the Old Tim rs or anization and praised the Champion organization generally for tbe maj .r part i · i play- · ing in the all-out war effort and pre­dicted mu h ucce for the indu ·try in p acetirne po t-war da, ah ad. Plant Manaqer Speaks Dcalino- bri fly with tentati e po t­war plans for tl1e Cant n divi -ion of the company H. A. H lder plant man- 0' r, e. PP', ed d finite appre rati · n foy the c: nd I yalt f Old 'rim "r . and heartily \ 1 n <;d th 45 inc ming member into the kl Tim r r alm1 Text of ~Jr. Helder' ~ dclr ~ f II . s: \Vh , n we met a } e~ r ag \' ~ w r 1 akin into th T w Year fWed with hope hat by the time \V. 'Nould m e again the greater portion of the Euro- · (24) pcan war W0 tid be bebi nd us. . 'nfor­tuna . ·ly tltt · h~ s tlO ' CfJffi to pa ... s. .''Today we a re 1 old by rhcJ~C in au th­e nty that whir . fio~l vk ory i~ in ·i ht f r us ,.ve mu" stdl face many hard b· t~1e5, b th n rh firing Jines, a- weH as · m our sh ps, before w · can. feel ecurc a d ac ually know ha er-many is dc£eated. 'These sa me authoritic ai~o advise u tha ·we should be thinkin r of the future imJ. complete ur plan& for post war operation. "With this in mind we tho 1 ht it of i nteres~ t the Old Timer group to know just what our thou hts for the future are. "'The information we are able to ob­ta in from the Scandinavian c untries, who, a you know, are our chief com­petitors in the pulp market, is rather sketc:hy, yet we are told that these countrie have avalaible for delivery to our country upon the termination of the war, almost 1,000,000 ton of pulp. "vVe also are certain that vou are aware of the fact that the rate of pay in these countries i very lew, as com­pared to the American rate of pay; and with this condition confrontina u , it will require the greatest amount of skill and cooperative effort on the part of American labor and management if we are to a sure ourselve' of con­tinuity of operation in American in­du try po ·t war. "Confronted with thes fact it i .Champion's beli.ef that th sure t \AVa to protect our operation and tlte c n­tinuity of peration :f ame i b_ ton- . ertino- the gre·tt r portion f our ra~ material i11t H -h finished prod uct a. may be i.a tb gr ,at t demand -fol~ low-ing th war . Expansion Plans Revealed "1 f U -v ring ut u h a 1 r ,gram .it 1 our th ;~ u gh to materia II irrc rea · e onr kraft mill pr ductiofl. '1J h a mtl c will c;;t ll form ny costly in sta lla­ti n , such a ; n ' ' smelter new c:hip ~ l ers h rot:> r ·va r rat r~, increase l liqn r~maki ng apa it , a ld d - quip­m n for tock wa hin , ndditi nal di e ter , and th install (l.ti n f n w bleaching y'tcm. 'Probability of conv"rtina on four pulp machines into a board machine. • Members of the Old Timers' Club stand for the lnvocation. 'Possibiliity of installin o- another la -~ e paper machine similar to ou r r .. e ·ent No . .J machine. -).:eed for an additional hio-h pre - su ·e boiler and added electric equip­men · . · Remember plea ~e that the comple­t1on of the majority of these in talla­tion i.:- contino-ent upon the termina­tion of the European war and can only be done with the approval of the \Var Pr uction Board in \Va hington. ··A ~ rated before, Champion feels hd.t he abo\'e mentioned program i a ound one for us to follow, but in do­inn- ~o ~·e mu t be a: ured of the 1 val znd fuU cooperation of all our work~n· if Ye are to ~ ucceed. ·'From pa, t experience. we ha e no he~ irancy in stating that ' e fe~ l that v·e "-ill have the as istancc fr m the Reube.n lt Rpb~_rt~s->Q addressing the meeting Old Timers group, such as we have had in all -imi.lar past experiences. '~To the 45 new members entering the Old Timers group tonight, we bid vou a hea rtv welcome. Vve trust that ~ ~ - your year of association with this oroup of Old Timers may be pleasant one , yea rs in which all of ns may come to a fuller realization of the true value of friendship." Everett J. Galliene, connected with the electrical sta ff of the company, re­. ponded to 1\,fr. Helder's address of vvelcome on behalf of the incoming club n1ember . He pledged their continued cooperation and loyalty throughout the year to come and declared they were indeed fortunate to be a member of an· organization uch as Champion. A a p.reliminary to pre5enting the medal , to the 45 incoming Old Timers, h. l< obertson spoke of how deeply he appreciated their comradeship tbr JU h ut the year and cleclar d their 1oyal y a.nd cooperation was a very J:efinite part of the Champi n pr -ram. .:\tfr. Robertson' rnessage foi l ws : Mr. Robertson Speaks "Thi . n eting of th Old 'T'imer is an jmportai'lt n --in that it narks the 10th birthday of the dub it shows tl hi h ·st at cnda nee w have cv r had with the largcs number of new mem­b . r. 1 and it lH& at a time wh n America i- facing the mo t criti al cris of it history. ' ' [ t i fortunat ... tbat. we · ha · this in crea. ing numb "r of 1 cm.bcn; beca u , · the Old Tirners gr .· p rep.r •s ·nt:.s tbc reate t o1ume of experience for w (25) have more than th re_e hundred mem­bers and 300 t imes twenty five means the equivalent of 7 500 years. Ex­perience brings judgment and wisdom, and in these days of crisjs, judgment and wisdom are very precious qualities. "In the years ahead, we plan to fur­ther strengthen our position in scienti­fic development, in extension of s'ales, in creating st ronger financiaL corner stones. We believe, and I'm sure your experience has taught you to believe atso, that the greatest job security comes from association with an indus­try that is sound. in all these particu­lars. Where suspicion, doubt and hos­tility exist between management and workers 'is like a house built upon the sands. It cannot weather the storms of hard and difficult time . There can be no real security, no really succes ~ ful ent rpri se unless the rock foundati on · of conftdence and under s tandin<~ ha b . en preparecL \¥c have had in gen­erou n:1 easure in t he past th hear ty sUJ p rt of the Old Timer~ in buildin this rock foundation for · curity. We ask an I. ea rtiestly h pe f r an unbrok­en ontinu ati n of that ::;upp rt for the futur . Champion Is Friendly ' Iti