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The Log Vol. 25 No. 12

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  • Between 1914 and the late 1960s, the Champion Fibre Company published an internal newsletter, called The Log, to share news about the Canton mill, the community, and its employees. After 1940, news from the entire “Champion Family,” which included mills in Hamilton, Ohio; Houston, Texas and Sandersville, Georgia, was featured in each issue.
  • OF CHAMPI ON ACTIVIT IES • C 0 N T E N T S The Four-lh War Loan Drive 2 Fiqhtmq the War With Waste Paper_ _ 3 The Workinq Capitalist_ __ 4 Edit.orials _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 8 Radar. What is it? _ 9 CHAMPION FAMILY NEWS Hamilton Division _______ _ 10 Canton Division ______ ____ 26 Houston Division_ _ _ _ 36 JAN'UARY 1 9 4 4 . VOL. XXV NUMBER 12 • e art.n e6 ' ljmn From the h alls of Montezuma, To the shores of Tripoli, We fight our country's battles On the land as on the sea. First to fight for right and freedom And to keep our honor clean; We are proud to claim the title of UNITED STATES MARINES. Our flag's unfurled to every breeze Fron1 dawn to setting sun; · .. ' . We have fought in every clime and place Where we could take a gun; In the snow of far off northern lands And in sunny tropic scenes, Y OJl will find us always on the job- THE UNITED STATES MARINES: Here's health to you and to our corps vVhich we are proud to serve; In many a strife we've fought for life And never lost our nerve; If the ARMY or the NAVY Ever look on heaven's scenes, They will find the streets are guarded by UNITED STATES MARINES. P U B L I S H E D B Y "T H E C H AMP I 0 N F A M I L Y" HAMILTON, OHIO : HOUSTON. TEXAS : CANTON. N. C. : SANDERSVILLE. GA. Established 1914 • • - • ..- • · .. • • .. · • - Twenty-Ninth Year ol Publication The paper for the cover of thi-. 'maquine is Champion Cordwain, and is made in our Hamilton Division plant ov.t of wQOd from the ior&JSts of pie southern states. The paper _for the inside paqes is Champion White Satin Refold Enamel made in 01,U' Hamilton plant. We manufacl\U'e ma-:1 .? 9radea of bleached papers, Machine Finished, Super CaleU.red.. ancl Coated. 1 • I I I ! I f. i I f ! t . . . A dime from ever y dollar- that's what Uncle Sam asks you to invest in War Bonds to back up our boys on the fig'!\ting fronts. ' Dear Editor: The 4th \:Var Loan drive tarts January 18 and continues through Febru ary 15. T he objective is $14,000,000,000. Of this amount the goal for indi-' vidua l ~a rtic i p ati on is $5,500 000,000, The greatest market for th is tremendous investment for in di vidua ls in th is wa r loan .is among t he employees of the Nation's business .and industrial firms . .. t he cornpa:nies repres,ented by the edi rs of c mpatry pub­lications. For these workers, the most popular ipvestment is t b e S· en. e "E:H. o. r " ].;> eop1 e ' ·.g ond " m. ~·1. e~e'11o' mm~n•o .ns from $2S to $1,000. · During this most important driv in whi h tb.e gr ·at­e t amount of money ever as ed f indi idu al citi4 · is being ou h by you r Governrn nt your lo an i "'Lee a.ll back the attack." \V ha;v found by experience jn ther driv that ~be _s~m n rest apnea+ i th.e patrio[i ~ appeal that ry m.drvtdual can lo hns or h.~r part to help '-vlll the war and. to ba.ck up. tbe1:· Io:ved one wh:o are :fightln on fore1gn sml to wm thn, v1ctory o er our en " u~i s. It r throuoh th- medium f the company .f' uhlica­ti n that we ri1U t depend. to a great d egree to bring • Better and Faster Treatment of Wounded Soldiers Has Greatly Red'uced Deaths From Casualties in World War 2 . c ordin )'to a rec nt report of the Office of War Informa­tion ::>olcliers in j ur d in World vVar 2 have twice as good h .· nce to s ur ive a t hew u.nded man had in World War 1. Vl hile modern weapons of warfa re are wice as deadly a · the a rm ament of 1917-18, the medical care is far superiJr to the care given soldiers d ur.ing \Vodcl \Var 1. As are u1t, v e are informed , the chances are 96 out of 100 wounded men in V.,T rld V.,T a r 2 will survive. In \Vorld War 1, shock a..nd infection c.:wsed the largest per cent of death to the injured, but in the present war, blood pla rna transfu sions greatly reduce the hoGk danger, and the " Sulfa drugs" have minimized the possibility of in­fection, both the A rmy and N avy report. In vVorld W a r 2, the fir st aid stations have been moved up almost to the front lines, thus provided fa ter and better treatment of the wounded. " In the last wa r, wounded men were brought to t he hospital," which was stationed several miles behind the fighting f ront, "in this war, lhe hospital goes to the wounded men." According to Army records only 35 out of every 1,000 soldiers injured succumb to t heir battle wound . The death rate in the last war was 60 per 1,000. The Navy losse., are only 31.6 men in each 1,000 wounded. The Ma,rine Corps reports a death rate of only 31.5 death per 1,000 wounded. Nearly 60 per cent of soldi ers suffering head inju rie in World War 1 died, but in thi s war death from head injuries have been cut to 9 per cent-due to plasma and sulfa t r.eatments. home to workers everywhere the fact that they are not helping to win this war-that they are not back ing up their loved ones-unle.ss tbey make a real sacrifice. And,, if they a re able to they are not ma king a rea l sacrifi ce un1ess t hey invest at least $100 in \Va r Bond d uring t his 4th War Loan~a n investm ent over and above what they .a re now buy ing through pay-roil sav­ings or other tnethods o£ purchase. - · P ay rolls are at the highe t peak .. . It is es­sential that workers r "alize that they can· aff rd to b 1.:1.y extra Bbnds ... or -rather th at they ca nrt atr rd ,not to b-uy extra Bond· during the 4th \Va r Loan. T hey rn.u . t sacri fice . o.rnething ... stop , pending for scnnethinw .. . in order to ruake th sacrifice ne essa.ry t . in vest in V\T ar Bonds to back the atta. k . .. to help their conntry, .th ir loved ones. a.nd to build up ,a nest e g for their own s u rity for post -wu n eds. The pay r 11 ~~win · section of th War Finance Division a n ~;:wu nc . rfu·at quotas will b establishe l fo r a :h firm J.:n. theo CtYLmtry for the driv ·. A q tiOt'a fo·r ..... ,,~>ry p[ant and a person.-.to'"pcrson s licita tion for ver worker are the 4th \Tar l1otln obJectives of pa -roll saviri s. TJ:1€ fir r:n queta will be fi xed ~lt ~r doll r fi gure that rcpre, e~ts an av rage o f. a $ 100 extra B on.·~ per mpl yee. In s10me. pl ants cl:us quota may be h1gb1 er dep<r:nd ing on tl1e firm pay roll . · U. S. 'Freasw ry Department Washington, D. C. ' ' Fighting the or The bombs that g to war~ whether th y b the mall 250 pound variet · or the huge block-buster that le el entir Axi \var plant , need more than metal and e pl sive to make th m efl ctiv . Every bomb, surp ri sinO' though it ma r be; r quires a quota of waste-pap r pr du ts t do an frecti j b in sma binG" our enemies. 25-0 pout-ld b mb-is encircled by bomb-bands made of fi e pounds f waste paper the 500- pound bomb with bands requirin . ix pound& of wa, te paper and the 1 00 pound bomb requires nine p unds. In addition, the "fin lock nut prote tor" fabri at 'd from one ound of wa te pap r solved r trying and delicate problem for th se fighting our war in the air. :NI re than 16,000 aerial bombs had been 1 t becau, e the fin l ks broke, loosing the b mb before the target ar as were reached. Thes fi n lock ar protect d now by a special covering made from wa te paper collected thr UO'hout indu try and in the homes of million of American . _ ,_ hen our ground army mo es forward in the islands of the P acific and up the penin ula of Italy, the shells they fire arrive at the front line protected in paper shell cases. For every one of the millions of h ll that must be fired, approxi­mately one pound of wa te paper must be collected to be turned into paper-board and then fa bricated into water-proof, moisture-proof hell ca e . F ood, ever important, to a fighting man who averages five pounds per d ay to k eep him in top physical trim, is pack­a ed and ent to the front in paper containers. The field radon container weighing one-half pound bulks large when a bit of figuring how that more than three tons of waste paper i required to package field rations for one division. Baking powder cans, requiring only three ounces of paper eath> reach the unbelievable number of 200,000,000 used each year by our ar.med fo rce . The vit al need for waste paper products does not stop with the up-plying of carton and wrappings for shells, bomb and food supplie . Our medical corps depends on the safe a rrival of blood pla sma directly to the battle lines. These blood plasma u nits, each self contained in a half-pound car­ton, are a familiar ight on every battlefield, so familiar, in fact, t ha one war correspondent recently cited a great num­l er of cont ainers he aw littering a Pacific beach-head ca p­tu red by American ._ tlarines~ Fighting a global w'ar in every climate and under -all kinds of fi htin condition make d mands on all the mate ial that A me rica can produce. Thes materials and supplie mu-st o t o wa r af ly packaged. To packa e them requir s all h waste paper we can ave. Some evid nee of the n ed w con erv is found in the ackagi ng material n dcd f r t hese war g od : R . ' "~'" . a 1on 1~ - --- ------ -- - -- - --~ - ~- - . 52 lb . wa tepaper Canon to hold 15-.. 0 caL trac r bull· s Carton to hold 1--50 eal. incendiary bullets - - - -- -- - - --.-..-.- -- - ---- -~­Lifeboat emer ency rati n - - -------­Carton to hold " 45 al. i t l ar­tridges - - --- -- - --- - ------------ .Car on hold 1 tube poi on as oint- .0 3 l s. .083 lb . . tbs. .047 lbs. · ment - -·----- - ----------- ---- -- - .. 3 llvs. - Carton t bold 10 ealed tube cartridg- · e for inflating life belt ---------- . 34 lbs. " " " ,, ' ith aste Carton to hold 1 life pr server light __ Carton to h ld 10 doses y llow fever • vaccme --- -'- ------- - ------_ - - _ Carton to hold 227 gram lend-leas' Paper .049 lb . wastepa ~er .092 lbs . tea __ ,_ _____ ,. ____ __ __ ____ ___ ___ .042 lbs. " The holiday eason br ugh th greatest demand for the " " boxes . peci al fibr · b a rd contain rs f r the gift sent o · erseas and to ca·ntps. However, need for these b xes is constant and each requires approximately two pounds of wa t paper, Pound aft r pound, tm on to:n, paper in tremendous amounts is n ed d to or erate a fl hting for e of nearly t n -million men. We all must save this paper ; we all must see that it i . oll ted and turned into the war material that will help brinQ' Victory. The March of Dimes Infantile paralysis epidemics which surged to th eir highest point in several year during 1943 might have provided a major setback for America's war effort if it had not been for the dimes and dollars given by the American people during the annual celebrations of President Roo"evelt's birthday each January 30, declares Basil O'Connor, president of The National Foundation for Infantile P aralysis. The ton of the disease was materially less because the people were so well prepared against just uch an emergency, he states. "In the war against polio, a in any war, speed of action is decisive and this year when the shadow of this plague loomed large over our vital war effort it was of the utmost importance that we were prepared with money and equip­ment to marshal our forces swiftly to e ery point that the epidemi1. enemy invaded," he said. "It was particular! important that The National Foundation for I-nfantile Paraly­sis- which is owned and maintained b the American people -had trained hundreds of K enny technic1ans before the se rious outbreaks occurred." Due to the 1943 epidemics th re is. an in r a, ed need for contribut ions durin the 1944 Fund-Rai ·ing App- al which extends fr m J anuary 14th o 1 t inclu i e. o-Join the March of Dim - nd your dime · and dollar to th P re i­dent at the Whit House. Tb ti nal F md -i n tor Infantile P ralysi 120 Broadwa T York, (5) N. Y. In t wn in __, r)'ia li e nativ r put d t b h lf- ' jt, d a11d t h m p · k u d .-ff·r (until a f. ·ks ag ) , t o c in pr . d out ( the palm . f th t nd d han l. Ani k "'l onlcl b bid . id--a dim nnd l a ' t ld h uld l a ··· n· and to tak ~ b.i h ic . ll.w th uld )·uffaw \ ·ben h pick d u the nick 1 ~ b cau e . , h ,·I lain d, it • th latg r oin ~ On d a hndl trano· r a ked him: "0- n you reallv kn w the cliff rene in v lu b t\V n a clime and a nickel ?" Sure I d /' h r pli d, ' b.u }f I v r . nee took the dime th y ' ould n v ·r tr m a r m. (3) • THE ORKING CAPITALIST Labor i.., a<· to und rst nd. It In an rk. But it' hard f r m t ;\' rking p opl t think f th m elv s as being apitalists. Th only differ nc . b t\ en capital and work is time. v rk i , \vhat ou d today. Capital i ·hat y u ha r . 1 ft o r fr m w rk that wa done in the past. f. r in tance: kill i pital, be ause it i som thing gained by past work that h Ips make toda s Yvork mor ff cti . 1a hi~es are capital, b cau in them is stored up the work of the past, waiting to make todav '"'ork more eff ctive. Money i the m ans of swapping capital. Your life insurance policy is an example of this, because past work has been stored up in the form of dollars. As long as the policy-holder can work for himself, those dollars are u ed to help others do work ( because the insurance company invests them) . When the polic -holder can no longer work, the dollars come back. Ever r man \i\ ho develops skill, tools or useful property beyond what he spends in living is part v orker part capitalist. . Every man who reduces the amount of his work, either through lo afing on his own dough, or slowing down, or opposing efficient machines, or striking, directly reduces the rate of industrial p_rogress and good living for himself and all Americans. When the war is over, every man who keeps his money in a sock, or bank vault, will reduce the amount of work that can be done. Those two things are automa,tic. In normal times, when money works, men work. ]. H. McGraw, ]r. (Reprinted from POWER NOTES) • Instruments For Measuring Time The sundial and hour-g1as were, perha s among the first in trurnent used by man to measure time. The hour- lass was practical for night and day as well as in cloudy weath r, but required a great deal of att ntion. The hour-gla · con-i ts of a o-]a s ve sei havin r n:vo funnel-shaped compart­ments id otical in ize. Tbe two small end · wer attached with a hole thro11 1 the center. In the uppermost c mpartrn n ju ·t et ou h sand m rcury or water was placed wh1 h would pass from the upp r h lf of the hou - lass t th bottom section in a ,-iv n tim , then the glass ~, s turn d up ide l ' n and the o ration r 'P a ed. The tmdial, an in trume.nt ' hich sh w the time f cla by the sl1adow f th sty! p in on a pia e ur cylinc.l.ri ·,I ur­face when t11e sun is hinin . Btt:· it as of n n , ' , nigl1t or on loudy days, o the Babyloni n and bald , n in­vented the clep ydra, r wat r lock, a · c otriv· nee f r mea - uring time by tl1e rraduat d How f , liquid thr uah a sm· l1 aperttJ re. One ty! ,, of cl p yd.ra used by th' E ·_rptian. ~ now d water t. dnp tl1rou gh hole in th · bot n1 f j r, and ~ ~.he water w nt down it ex o d mark:- n th. j.ar tl;at md1cated the hours. n o~ her t p atl: r d th drip­pmg water and used tbe ev ·r Ill rea ·m vv "1 •ht t driv a point r around a dia1 sjnai lar to th ... hauds - n a c) ck r w-atch. Amon the m ny ingeniou n ri vane to mea 1 r time, the wat r lock built ,..00 year ag in anton China i one of the oldes t, and if not destroyed during the last fe-vv years, is still functioning, we are inf rmed. The Canton w ter clock consi ts of four copper jars pla ed one abmr · th ther on four teps. 1 h top and lar est jar i 6lled -vvitl1 water every midn ight by the keep -r f tim . Th ,, at T drip from jar to j ~1r throu ah carefu lly 1 repat: d h 1 until it reaches the smalle t ontain r. The la t jar is marked with a ale and fl at that ri n the · urfac of th wat r to indica he c )rre·t time. Thi clo I need n ) windin_o-, has n sp riu s, n · ds 1 o le tri ity t k p it oing and there .is no va l or ntion, sill it i . .lo at ·cl in a ~o 1 pla -th old l cl t vV"r. Tb Chin .. -vvat r ' lock i ' ctn imf r v m ,nL )f th . ·I p- , ydr u d by th E Yl tian , , Babnl nians an 1 "I 1 ~tn ·er.t uri • · t f r hri ·t, It i · ' id that t he J'lll st clab rate and mpli at d of all time rn a ' ll rin instrum nr: is th · f£m1ous Stra .b uro· clo k. in d old '- th(~dral in Strasb urg, Fr n ', krat'd on th Hl] i r 70 mil a,t o[ J .. an~y .... !'his l k is id t b • hin fe t J i h and it not on l_ t Jl ~ tl tim· fda but al o Li1C d . f th we k, month, ani th · p iti n { th 11 n, the lan t ~ and sta r at . trasb ~u r . F b. day f th \V e i: in llcate t by a li tt ln li ure. On ' uud-L r 11 () • - ~car on l\1 n lay, Di n-~<, and so n. F>tch d 't at noon th 1 w l e Ap ~ ·tl · a rnc.lc b f re a figure of Ch ri, t, \vhil a ck fl p.· its vin ' and .row ·. \'e hop th rman::; will not de ·troy rhi , wond rhd timepiec , n r the J p · d e ~ rr y h wat r 1 k t ant u, hin, . ' British Hospitality For Our Boys In England "Kantara" Lat chmoor V ay) Gerrard tos , Buck ,. En ·land. Reuben B. Robett. on E q. , Th" Champion P aper & Fibre C rnpany, Cant n Divi ion, Dear l\1r. Robertson I was plea ed to receive y ur cable readin o- : ''THROC :rH THE CHAlVIPTON LOG vVE H VE SO ·­G~ TED T CHAI\1PION BOYS IN Tl·IE ARMED FORCE THA.T THEY CALL lPON YOU FOR S CH '\.SS L TA ~ ~ CE A I \i\ 11 Htl REA 0 AND -ro TJ MAY BE ABLE TO OFF 'R TH 1'1\I 1 HIS IS FULL COV­ERED l1: I\~IY LATE TtLY LETTER" and in reply I tdegrapl{ed you a ~ follow : ''.YOl R LETTER NOT YET RECEIVED BUT SHALL BE VERY PLEASED GIVE ALL POSSIBLE AS­._ I TA:NCE A_ -y CH.Al\,1PION BOY OVER HERE" I ha e much plea ure in acknowledging receipt now of your letter of July 23 rd, and needle 's to say I should welcome everJ opportu nity of being able to be of service to any Champion boys who a re in the American armed forces over here. I an1 very glad indeed to kno-vv that you have sug­ge'tecl to su -h Champion oldi ers through 'THE Loc th at they call on me or get in ·ouch with ·me for any help I can · give them, and if you will kindly send me fro1n time to time the names-and such addresses as you have- of those Cham-· pions w.ho are in this country I shall b e pleased to contact them and offer them a your official rep resentative, any as­si ~ tance , a-dvice or per_ onal attenti on thev might need. I am most anxiou · to do all I can in · this conn ection. so· pleas clo not he itate to call on me for any services I ~can render, no matter in what capacity, which you think would be of help. Thi ' will, at the ~ arne 6me} al o enable me to become more generally and more closely acquainted with the (Champion Family", which I should .app reciate very much and I am ure that th·ese contacts will be pleasant and memorable. .: by I be pardoned for adding my admiration of yet an­other example of the splendid and unriv alled spirjt of help­fulness, good-will and interest at heart which the Champion managemen ha for it employees and which is so chanlc­leri tic . i the Charo.pion or · anizati n. I .now look forward to rec iving from you at an. early date the names of Champi n, in E ngland and remain , . Y ur very tr.u1y, Percy '". P~ e tz . EDITOR~ NOTE: - '1r. Paetz and Champion soldi rs who may be tation d in the Brit1 h I les: We re rea very much . ind · <1 rh at w are unabl to send Mr. P aetz the nam s f for er Cl ampi 1 employee who are in the Armecl Se rvic and iFJ Fn lanJ at the present time. The only addre £ th · boy wh ) ~tr e ip foreign ervice f{e ha e i .P.O. _ '~w York, 'an Francis , Seattl ~ "ew Orleans, etc. Letter bat are sci t A.P.O. fro Ne York nay go to Iceland , Envland, " r. rth f ica~ i ily . or Italy. . . . W:e uo-ge t t Champi on b ys wro may be n w; r in . the future, staboned in T~n .land to notify Pe cy . (.;. Paetz, "Kantara" Latcbmoor \Vay Gerrards Cros.l Bu k En - !and, where , ou ar . l cated and he will be glad l O help you 1n any way he can. A Double-B-a rrel Cannon Perhaps the Only One in the World Po ing otl the lawn at the City Hall in Athens, Georgia, is an unu ual rel ic of the C i · il \Var-a double-barrel cannon. T his unusual piece of arm ament-the brain child of a sup­porter of the Con{ec:leracy, was c;:ast in a foundry located in the eastern ection of the city of Ath ens during Civil \Var days, but it wa ~ not as succes ful as the inventor had hoped it would be. · · . . T h_is field".piec.e was designed to d i sc~arge two balls about /-­three mches m . di ameter at the same u me. 'The ball were attached to a long iron chain,-with the 1dea of discharging the cannon at app roaching columns of the enemy, and1 in t he language of Charlie r..IIcCarthy, "mov ·'~m down.'" One can imagine the constern ation in the ranks of the enemy when, by some unseen power, a swath ten feet wide was cut through the columns of t he approaching enemy. Or perhaps with a battery of such armamen't, a whole army could he m.owed down in one blast. As the story goes, after the clouble-ba rrel cannoD; was built, a trial shot was neces a ry to pro e its uperiority over the old single barrel type a a mass ki ller. S a charge of powder '\Vas ramn1ed into b t h barrels, on top of whi ch was placed a cannon ball 9-ttached to an iron chain, and fire wa applied to both touch boles. But the exp losion in one barr el occurred a fr acti n o{ a econd before the mher. a re tilt. the ball in the barrel where the e/plosion fir t eurred v a {o rced out a head of the other, ca u ~in cr the cann n to werve tO QUe side, ffi iSSiL'lg th mark and the balls and chain tea rinCY d wn A hen' maiu str ct, d "moli s_he l ·ever l wagon park d on t he 8tre t: •;mel knock d the p illars fr m a hot l bal ony, an in (.J trr at .• citemel'lt amon(); t he p or l · f th city . . An thet s tory i._ to the effect th at v hen it 'I a tri I · .ut on the bat le11etd, one ban ~·l llred h acl of th ~· th r and as a r -· ult th · cannon S1i . er d i:H ' und an 1 killed a nurnber f sddi rs ili th Con fed 'rat arm?; Aft , i· \A.rhi . h th · nnon w & ·on .. -id 'red im 1 racti-cal f r :vva rh r • and nc:v r fn ed a ·· in. . . . H we ·r v ith tlin 1 ct ri cal d, d ;, ubl ·-ba rr l cannon. s u ~ h a OJ r a t · u C<,.: '8sfu 11 y. a ta ·b nC~c nt f r di · bar ing e I· n Jni ·bt be' n: ade t • War Bond a re the n rhtin 111al11S o·uai":tUt c that the f lks back hon1e tand . elidly b hind htm.' - ,......_ /: / A Sailor Never Whistles On Ship A .custom centuries old. prevails today Recent! we read omewhere that a sailor never whistles on a hip; '"because," it is said, "in the days of the wooden ship, centuries ago, the boatswains pipe whose shtill sound commanded attention and signaled silence when orders were to be iven, mi ht be confu ed with whistling. As a result whistling on board ship was forbidden. \Ve are informed that although the battleship's lot1d s eaker bellows most of the orders today, there is still a use for the whistle. It seems that th tone of the "pipe" is regu­lated by the position of the hand and fin ge rs abou the odd­shaped silver ball, together with the antra tions of the throat and tongue give ri se to the sil very tones which l'e­semb1e whistling. Ana That's How It Was Wilda Hutson I did a favor y sterday, A kindly littl " d d . . . And then .I caJled o all the w rld o st p and I k and h d. They stc;pped and look d and fiatt red m In words I ould not tru. t, And when th · world had gon" away My g od d d turned t dust. A very iny c urt sy ,.- .l {ou~d to do today; , · fwas q uJ ckly d n , wnh n n to se , · And th o I ran away ... But om one nlll st hav witn · d it, For-truly I d dare- As I s1 ed back the tony pa ·h Ros s were blooming ther ! • (6) Tiny Light Visible For 60 Miles 1 t)all ' '. rchlight n .i c-er ~ n a(. aln ccr.rding to th gu 1 1 of he S 1 nc 1ge • so pow rfullt wil r. j" t 1.5 e<w~l pow r be m. vi ihle for ixty nau ica1 md · ha · I n d ·1gn d by W 1ngho e engineer ro aid the e · u of · vintor f rc cl do n at ea." . _Th • tiny e r ~li h~s ill b ,.. worn by each person in he m1ltta r . c an-flymg an era ft. he lam are pack d wi h the rubb r lif raft and "the light fit ·on a band around the h d lik e a miner' cap, so the men can have bo h hands fr ' t h ld on in r ugh weather.'' The r\1bbcr life r f s are also now radio-equipped so that fly r adnft at sea can all for help. The mes-age sent out by fly r a~rift on the ocean C<l:n be picked up by ships four hundred mdes away, and at mght when a distres me saoe. is picked up, the tiny searchlight will help to reveal he exact position f the flyers who have been forced down into he sea. When a ship has foJ lowed an S.O .. signal to within twelve or fifteen miles of those sending out a distress signal, the ship's crew have to depend largely upon some visible signal- :uch as flares, rescue lamps, etc. The e lamps are connected to a small hand-cranked generator which I in­cluded in the rubb ~r raft equipment. In addition to. the re cue lamp which can be seen by aviators for 60 miles, the U. S. Naval bureau of aeronautic also provides each flyer with a supply of chemicals, described as, "a red flourescein crystalline powder, whid:, when drop­ped into the water makes a la rge yellow-green patch on the water, visible ten miles away from a plane 10,000 feet alti­tude. One small package of chemical three inches by five will light up a patch of water forty feet in diameter, which lasts for several hours. The glow is not alone confined to the surface of the water, but the powder ink to a depth of three to five feet-its specific gravity is such that it doe not sink deeper." This causes the entire top layer of water to ·glow, so that waves do not wipe the light off the oceants surface. Due to the curvature of the earth, which is . pproximat ly .67 times the sqt1are of any distance in mil , one i, not able to see very far even from th watch-tower on a hip n a clear day. For e ampl , the -urfa .e of th cean ten mile fr m wb re y u a re, is 67 f et lo\iver than where th hip or rubb r raft may be. But the pilot of a pi ne c n se many rni.le around him. Ju t h w far one an really s e i not kn wn howe · r, it depend upon th altttud , rang- :f vi i n, tc. Th following' i i n ran · f rmula w rk nd ut l liJ p r ~tptain , ar inf rm d i apr tt g d indi ,~­tion [ tb ran . f visibilit fr m v ri u h i he : F1· m 1,000 f t- you .an · ---------------------- 2' 00 f t- y Ll 11 " \JI _ _ __________ __________ ..,... 3,000 r t- ou an s . ---------------------- 4,000 f · r- y t l L\11 C --~------------------- 5, 0 f ·ct- you can C ----------~-~--------- 10, 00 f "t 1 :1.n 8 15,00 [c ' t- you ~ an s 2 0 0 r t:t~yc u ' n s 2 , 0 f L- yuu n s --------~------------- ---------------------- ---------------------- - ---------------------- It's. our :tr. L L' ftght it now. and send your dollars into the fight. Buy m re V\l r Bonds ' ' --. • Interesting .. Items Gathered Here and There The av rage freight train today ru.ns 56 per cent {aster th-an in 1920 and can·jes 40 per cent more fr eight. }) ,, ((, (( George vVa hington was tme of the wealth-iest men in the countr owning 110,000 acres of real e tate at his death. )) )) (( (( Durino- Colonial days, all vehicles in Massa husetts and Rhode I land, were required. to maintain a "walking pace," and in ome case , had to be p roceeded by a Ragman on foot. )) :» (( (( - Over 10 mile, of we)di ng and cuttincr are required for th_e con truction of one Liberty ship. )) » (( (( During the Ameri ·an Revolution, the State of West Vi r­ginia upplied General \~lash i ngton with more soldiers than an other ~tate. » » « (( An outdoor movie theater operated by the Army in New Guinea shows current films within a month of their o-encral release in this country. )) » « (( There are approximately 100 negro colleges in the United States. So 1th Dakota was the fir st state t ·live-trap pheasants . for stocking pmrpo&es. )) )) (( « Early ·motion picture theaters were known as "nickel­odeons," beca'Use the admis ·ion price was five cents. )} )) (( (( Be!:\,uxite, used in the mR.king of aluminum, comes princi­pally frorn three states, Arkan as, Alabama and Georgia. Egypt has banned the sale of tractors- and threshing ma-chines. - . )) .-,, (( « Catherine de Medki is cr clited with the est abli shment of the French perfume industry in Grasse. )) )). (( « Puerto Rico shark oil has been found to have vastly more vitamin A than cod liver oil. )) )) (( (( • ~ I • It took 1,120 trains, not cars to move the first African post . It · is estimated that the United army to · about 4,400,000 barrels of oil a day. . . . States could produce » )) « « Coins were · ometime cut into halves or quarters to -make · change in early England. · )) » (( « - Lake uperior i about 600 feet above t idewater level. » )) (( « The fi rst Amencan expedition into the Arctic regions left Pbi1adelphia, Pa., in 1753. » » « (( Norway's coast line includes 150,000 islands. » » • « - Albany, New York is the oldest chartered city in the United States. » )) ' (( (( . . T'he first vault d or to h-ave a time clock was tha.t of the F!rst National Bank ·at Morrison, IlL It was installed in 1873. )) )) « (( During the Ice Age, walrus lived in what jg now Florida, ·and moose thrived as far -south as K entucky'. )) )) (( (( The outline of the letter "vV" can be seen on each wing of the 17-year-locust. )) )) (( (( A banyan tree in Bali, one of the largest in the world, covers two acres. )) )) « (( In the terrible blizzard that swept -the northwe tern sec­tion of the United State in 1888, thousands of head of cattle were frozen standing up on their feet in the ftelds. • The h eadcl re s of a ed with more than ~0 new auttJinn bat. )) )} (( (( ormad woman f Turk t n adorn ... 1 ounds f oi1:is, is eq uival€nt of a )) ))' (( (( CoL Franci T. Evan in 1 17 was the first m~n t J loop a · seaplane and the first to bring one out f & spin, Magnesi-um ~ons titutes 2.5 per ent o.f the earth' crust. .» » « (( About 71 millran .people live in the Frea h caloni€s throu -hout the w-Orld. )) » « · (f \Vet;~;po n s of the infantry are rifle, ba yo.n t .machine gun,_ mortar, pist 1, carbine, grenade and anti-tank gun. » » tc; « Seven per ceRt of th.e workers making tanks or -- ther la-rge artillery pieces are women. (7) .- Epitaph -On a Tombstone Rem . mber, friend, when pa sing · by, As y u are. now, . o one - was I. As 1 am now, so u you will b~, Prepare for d ath and follow m.e. . . A man, after reading the e. itapb~ t k a hatnmer and cb i$C} and wr t : . . . To tQHow you I'm nt'Yt ontent, Until I kngw wruch way y ti went. ' P ublished by The Champi n Fa!lla~ '. a? a Symbol of the Coe:peration and G d F~ 11 wslup E l~tlng at the Plants of Th Champi n .Paper and F tbre Coll?-pany, Hamilton; hi ; Canton, N .rth C a ro~1na · Honston Texas and andersvtlle Georgta. '· G. W. PHI'LLIPS _____ ____________ ~ ______ . Editor, Canton. North Carolina REUBEN B. B.OBERTSON. JR. __ ____ ___ _ -- __ .. ----- - - - -Associate 'Editor DWIGHT f. ·T H o· '~"··" SO· N ---- - ----·----------- - ----- - ---Associate Editor EMERSON ROBINSON. _______ __ _______ . Assistant Editor, Hamilton, Ohio A. M. KOt1RY __ ______ __ ___ ___ __ ____ __ . Assistant Editor. Houston. Texas All articles itt this magazine are w1·itten by the editor ~xc:ept those -which carry the na.me of the author. , Looking Forward- To Peace and Happiness in 1944 The. ='Jew Year is a time for looking fon~ra rd , not back­w- ard. For. while we may not have new tasks, new problems to grapple ·with, we have many unfii1ished ta sks which sho\Jld have our wholehearted attention. . · · The New Year doe not mark the beginning t>f a New Era, nor the pa ·ing of the old, but it does .offer to us another opportunity to fini h the tasks that a re before us: To do th i ·we are going to need, as never b e ~o r e, . the help of Divine power. \~·~e hou ld place our hand m H1s and follow in His foot~ tep each day and hour. As we stand on the th r e~hold of the~ Te"N Yea r 1944 with its 366 new days filed 'W ith such opportun ities as \ l\7e never faced before, what a re we going to do about it ? Have we resolved to make the best of every opportunity, by tak in g a firm vtand ~V:t1 t he Lord'~ side., arrayed a ai nst evil , a.nd Bght for that which is right. T oday, as v.:e luo1 out 'on the world drenched in htJman blood, and see men, wom n and children dyin , not only fr.om bull , bay n ts and mb ~, but from hun ·rer and p stil enc ; the re$:Uh f man's lu~->t fur pow r to wr st fr m ot her the right to live and be free. Ninete n hundted and fnrty-f ur will brino- u: nearer th goal we a1:e sc king,-fre dnn 'from the rhr .>at of uch tm­holy J ade1'S as Hit ler and T jo . . "We ent<.;r the l 1ew )·~ ar .. ith a cl ar rand brightc·r vision of th " ftttu r than w · d1 cl in J 94·3. A d ·1 ict J on this n'1 nth 's . o:;;.•cr of TH E L , we can clis · rn a f int udin · of "JDt:~t ·e n th astern h rizon ,~, i th a feeling a alm sr ·cr­tai ty ac ompaFtying i1. ne will also rH t~ that, a. s. tlt rnon1 ~ i11rr un di" pel · rh · la rkneas the , h~ do~ of the r ~s of Calva ry appears n the b J&crn of th great mi 'hty d ·f . a ·ymbol of pe:a and hope hr th , nati ns < f h ~artl1 . and fu tur bappin fc r aU p" pi . · w approach n ~ r T the we sh u]d 1 ray more carne tl • ncl 1f th is · horribl conflict. fight harder. buy 1 re V r B nd and \ · rk harder {< r viet ry over the en mi@s of righteou sn s . ut t·em ·mb r with the c ssat ion [ hostili i .. in .. urope the battle is only half cr-th bat le in the S01nh Pacific and th · Far 1• st ill · ax uur sLr . ng h to the utmo' -~ But the j aps mu t alsG be pu out of bu siness and peace re tored to the. p ~op l e f J1ina, th hilippines and oth ers under he heJl [the J apan ~ se, ~1ay Cod give u · the Victory. Industry-All-Out in the War Effort Indust riali ts are to be commended for the spiri of . co­opcra ti n manifest d in wi nning the wac Even befo e the 'P. a rl Harbor" episod e industry had entered the war on a la rge scale, but aft er the cowardly attack of the Jap on the 'U nited tat e, Naval Base at Honolulu, the leaders of indus­try dedicated th emselves and their posseS"s ions to W'inning the war rega rdless of the cost. Their attitude has been without a parallel,-tbe sacrifice of financial gain has been · without any demands for their 'right" there have been no "strikes" by stockholders for greater dividends. In fact in­du strial leaders have waived the future in favor of the needs of our country. Of course there are some who will contend that indu ~uy is profiteering-that is making an enormou profit on goods manufactured for war purpose , b1:1t figure speak for them­selves and proves such an attack to be false . According to a report on 50 large industrial concerns publi hed recently, the figures for 1943 compared with 1942 show : Production up 85 per cent. Total wages up 96 per cent. Taxes up 193 per cent. Profits down 18 per cent. Dividends dmvn 23 per cent. Therefore, it is not difficult to ee th at, aside from the main is sue which is winning the wa r and p reserving liberty throu ghout the land, irrd1Jstry at the close of the war may not be able to provide the jobs for returning , old iers a they hope to do. t nless indu stry is allowed to set as ide the money necessa ry for equipping their plant with up-to-date ma 'h in and converting to peace-time production, a lar e number of bu sines es may not be able to survive po t war conditions. ~rios t of the machinery after the wa r will be pra ti ally wom out or obsolete, and it will Tequire la rge sums £money to replace this machinery, an i th e chances a re thar many of tb count ries that are not in the · ar, will b bett r p re~ pa r d, and able t ell us goods chea per th an we can p o·si bl~ mantrfa ture them. Ho ver, we must win rhe war, th at lS our fi rs lu y. bu · • I-I 'ld tl1 ·o rch vV .r l onds and m of Fre dorn hi h. r W r h oJlds to and · ntinue t k cp our future fre . Thoug·ht for the Month 'I i · a g cl thin r t ~" i · th<Hlk · Llt . t h , Lor I and l in. · pra i ' l:S ur:ttc thy naroc, 0 mo t Jll h: t . shrw f rth ·thy l vi.no- kin In ' ·s in tl1e rn orniltg an l tht. faithf uht s · v ry n.ight. Th .Bible P ·:tim -?.- l "''") . ' (8) Investment • 1n ar Bonds • lS a Patriotic Duty In January 1944, th Fourth \Var Bond Driv will begin. The United State Treasurer i asking th citiz · n of Ameri ­ca to purcha e at lea ·t $14,000,000 000 ih War Savings Bonds during the f urth b nd drive. What are you going t do about it? Are you inter sted to the extent of bu 1ing an e tra bond ? victory i our, vV can all rejoice together1 and exclaim in one tremend u burst of applause-"We did it!" Champion ha n ver failed to o '0 er the Top" in every Bond Dri e. urel .. w wi ll not let the b s down who are in the rvi e this time. \Ve can t afford to-we must fight bra el and hard t the end, and ' hen the war is ov r and Radar-What Is It? vVe have hea rd a great deal about Radar-the wonder instrument f the acre. om ne ha aid aR adar i this war's only n w de elopment"-the r al ecret weapon. \Vhat i it? R ada r, i a code word meaning "radio-detect­in -and-rano-i no-.'' The instrument develope · an invisible ray of ultra-hio-h frequ ency wa e which are hurled into space, and when the ray t rikes a war hip, submarine or airplane 100 or 500 mile away it reflect back to its source, and electronjc devices measure the di tance and ascertains the direction in which the hip · ub or plane is traveling. If it is a plane, it will give you the altitude and speed. · T he in i ible ray will travel through darkness, fog , falling snow, smoke ~creen, etc., at the rate of 185,000 miles a sec­ond. R adar has become the eyes and ears of the Navy and Army and may contribute more than any other . ingle factor toward winning World \Var 2. · ccording to ma · azine tories, in non-technical language, this is the way it work : The wave penetrates the ether until it hi ts something, then the Radar wave is reflected by the object it strikes to it starting point. The time it takes for the Radar wave to start its journey and return indicates the di tance to the object it ha- found. Then electronic devices measu re the distance he enemy ship is from the Radar. It also record" the direction and speed of the enemy craft. R ad ar has proveR i valuable in convoy operations. W·ith the aid of it tho e in charge of a conv y are able to maintain const ant check on t he ships in the c nvoy as well as detect enemy ships, subs and planes a hundr d mile " away. Radar inst rumen on a plane tells pilot exa tly h w far they are above· ground-that is, when flying through fo o clouds mountain peaks are pointed ut in time f r · the pil t to escape di saster. Before the Radar was invented if the pilot di€1 not know the top graphy of the country ov r whi · h · e was fly ing there was dang r f a h ad- n · lli ion with the mountai!l peaks. Say! by-the-way are you a m m ber of our "Time Office D duction Plan ?" - Buying a bond each month? 1f you are not wont you be in today. W should do all that human h a rt and hand can do to win thi fight for freedom-free­dom not only for · America, but freedom for the peoples of Europe, A ia, ·and all the nation of the earth. Let us ' Ren1emb r P earl Harb r," " Pass the Ammunition" to the boys on the battle front. You can fight by Buying Bonds1 and more Bond . An Army Officer Comments Champion Loyalty on November 16, 1943 Reuben B. Robertson, Sr. Canton Div ision Dear Reuben: As you have been largely responsible and active in Cham­pion maintaining and promoting contacts with our 'former employees who are in the service of our country, I thought you would be interested in getting the reaction of Captain G. L. Gilleland, who is a friend of mine, and located some­where in the southwest Pacific. Captain Gilleland was a 1a wyer in J a~ksonville t Florida. In fact, he was born there and is a very able young man about 32 and I value his statements most highly. I quote from a letter received from him under date of October 30th : "In my Company I have a very fine Staff Sergeant by the name of William Stockton who was an employee of your organization in the Canton, N. C., plant. H e wa proud in tellino- me of the company and showing me pi ture of the plant It seems you are doing an excel:lent job in keeping in touch with your former employees. They really appre­ciate it. There is a great deal of esprit de corp among the 1hen with their former organizations." .. Possibly you may watrt to 1\!Ir. Phillips. With kindest regards, I am, pa s this comment on to ' Your very truly ~ Geo. S. Johnston Champion Pap r and Fibre Co. ... ew rk Offi '1 know I'm an ·ld-fa hi ned moth r, but I hould like to kn w wh re y u g ," , aid l\1lr . Slowe to her daught r. It is said, durin sea battl-e f r uadalcanal; b ard the merican battle hip wa a Radar in trum t. udd aly the in trument di sdo-ed the p re en of an n ~my hip abo';lt nine miles di stant a d th" :run of the men an b ttl sh1p "~ere pointed in th dir ction ~ the n emy .ship an.d b lched .a mighty E alvo. 1 e second d1 harg , d_esp1te th ~ darkne. s and foo landed sq 11arely o the en my sh1p and d stroy d It, tur ing the tide ·of th battle. " f urse, da .lino· !u r pli d the girl. "La t hi ht I dined with licut nant~w ·11, you d n t kn w him but he awfully weet and w nt to ra l place I don't su po.se you e r h atd f, and fini ·h d up t a funny little lub, but I didn't hear its name. All right, m.ummy ?' ''Of o ur e, dear. r ju, t lik€ to know." An Am rican airman in 1 ·"land wr te to hi parent : ' It i " c ld here that trhe inha bitan.t have to live somewhere else." Thi seem to be the 1nagic in trument of the age, or per-hap of all ages. · · (9) -• • • • • • 1/tl ' . • ) -- -- •••• -- I I amt on tmers n o etr The I C/43 n-et- to-~'"'ether of Hamilton ld Timer,·. he!J in the , ocial hall of the Pre ·b.n erian Church December 14-,. will zo down in mill historY a an out- ~ . ·tanding e\·ent. '- There are 19 ~ qualified member of the club at Hamilton-men and ,,·omen who ha\·e been with Champion a qua r­ter of a centur · or more. Of these, 142 \·ere in attendance at the dinner with the 110 wive · or husbands of gue ts, bringino- the tota l to .~j2. Every minute of the occasion was enj oyable. The fine turkey dinner, prepared by the ladie~ of the church, was rapidly anJ faultle:dy served, a a huge bir hday cake, on v;hich were 2j lighted candle , ~lowly revolved on a turntable em the frCJnt of the · tagc illuminated also by · pecia.l flood light:,. Memories On the back-drop were huge crayon portraits of Peter G. Thomson who founded the company a half century ago, and was its p resident until hi · death , and Alexander Thomson, r. , chairman until his death a fe\' years ago. On thi - drop also were shov.:n a rap­idly chano i ng panorama of hi o-hlights of Champion history, from the found­in a, through iloods and fi res, building opera ti ons and expan::ion , to the pres­ent golden anniversary. . \ fu sic ·was furni bed during the din­ncr by Hink's :\1elodiers, a mu ·ical or­ga nizati on from Oxford. Invocation \·a ::;a iel b) Sam Collier, a 31-year Champion. Charle Soule, one of the " three first ----------------------------------------------------- Left: OrgAnization minut 1 read by Mra. Ko hler. lllqht: Mr. Thomton deUver n9 his meauge of elcome. (10) CharnpicJn ·'', pre iclcd. He int.rodnccd tho ~ c about the pcaker tab!, and rc­q ue ·ted A. . Anderson. eli rector of per ·onneL to reaJ letters fn .m ..: e\·eral who were unable to attend. The e included Reuben B. Robcrt>:un, 'r., Capt. Reu ben B. Robert m, Jr.. Clarke l\farion, Charles (Doc) Rubin­son, president of the club, and Herbert Suter. It was a matter of o-eneral re rret that Pre ident Lo an CJ. Thorn.on was unable to attend bec~nt ·e of bu ine - e.n gagement' \Yhich kept him out ot the Cl ty. Homer Is Toastmaster Homer H . Latimer, .\I ill _\b nager, appeared in a llC\. rule-that f ma~­ter of ceremonic:-a nd hi::; lecn wit and rlea sant intr c1 uction - \' t re warm- 1 \' reetcLL Homer, \ hu ha:-; l: ern \ ith the p·tper inJustt y f r ~4 ye;:tr:;, ~.:1 iJ he regretted h' ha~l not alwa \":' 1 cen ' . ""'·ith "h;tmpi on. He L·:unc \ith the 'Olllf'an · ,·omcthing mor dJ·J.n li\ e y ·,1r::; a •u from the Pcc~ctt ('t m1 , n: and ~aid that thr tH t ~h the Vl':trs he ha~l '- ' h 'l'll in I lamilt n he haJ alw.t ·s knl)\'ll :wd lovt d two :ll tit· Lthlc \'ith hint Ch ~Hk~ s,lldl' Jlld \1 Rt>lfc­V\ itlt wlu 111 be had h ;~ d much (() ttt <tct. .\t t hi - point , I1 >t1lL'l' p:tid ,me (\f tlw l!twsl tr ibttiL'S 1 u:;sibl · to tktt ~· r .1 n d ( d d m ~1 t 1 u f C h :1 11111 inn - \ I P t \I f • - \·dt o t"t·lcht:HL'd Iri s 7(Jt h hinh [a,, · an - ni\nsa n · Dec 'n tbcr ~- • "] ·h;til cdwa\. · Lull. id r \1 ] 11ft• mv hn, .,,'' ll u rner :a id . • f ll' re\ il'\.t'd f()r a 11HH11t'Jll tb' his­lui) ur 'hampion \,"ith irs t) ri o-iucd ru. tcr nf ... 5 ernplCJyces a!.!:ain .'t a tot. I toJa v 1f more 1 han 5000 . • Alex Brings Message ' 1~ ander Thom::;on Jr., \'i , presi- A general view o.f Old Timers at the banquet tables dent and advertising manager, was in­troduced o bring the mes age of wel­come. Alex said in pa rt : "In the ea rly th irties an Ohio busi­ness man was elected a,- a candidate for director of the U. . Chzmber of Commerce. F ollov. ing the u 'ua1 p rac­tice, this man was invited to appea r before tbe director of the Chamber to outline his quabfica tions and to peak on a subject of his own choice. This man cho, e as his t itle "Emplo;ye r-Em­ployee R elation '. T his is ignifica nt becau e it indicates t hi s pa rticular per­" On' main interest in his business li fe. In the c urse of bjs sp ech, this busi­ne s man said: "1\r1.ost { the difficult ie in w}li ·b the employer now :finds }1im­sdf witl his employees ar seH made and are his own fa ult". I-1e said to many business men are trying to op­erate their bu -in.e s e ~ from a sky era p­er office in . 1ew York City r some other point away from tbe I lants. Tl ey do not know their ern:p loyecs their employees thinking or their employe-e ' problems and his Lead to lack of un­derstanding and actual distru st. He went on to enumerate other faults and weakne se of t he employer q.nd by and large was quite critical. H.e wer:-t . to considerable lengths to outbne h1s thinking c nce rning ideal employer­employe, relations and all in all wa crit ical of employe rs in general. "This. speech wa not well recei ed by the direct rs of th . S. Chamb(n of Corn:ne rce. In fa t , they were rnad and arou ed to the extent that th y did not want this p r · n to be ne of their ·i·oup. 'I'hey rnailcd to l . S. Chan ber of Comm rc- mern ers in th e ar a in 'v hi ch thi man vvras t 1: e: a director a lett r vvh i h d scrib ed hi as a d a1 ger­ous racli al and a tro uble makt: r. hey advocated tl at thi candid at be d - featccl and urged th · lecti n of a man who w~ at tha tin -e pr siclent of a lar n 1b ber manufacturing conce rn, TJ1e presid n · of Lh rub her man rf ac~ tu ri n ~· concern wa, el ct d by an o· c r- • wbelmincr maj ority. (11) Thinking Changes "Four y ears later this san1e indi - ·vidual to whom- I have re·ferred was surpri ingly renominated for the a rne office and, not sprpri ingly, won by as larcre a maj ority as he was before de­fea~ ed. I say "not surpri singly" be­cause th ere had been a dra tic change in th inking among the leaders of American industi-y and this person's thou o-hts ·were not considered radical but wb ere consl. dered w•t se an d en 11' h t-ned. It wa high time for a change- . ' 111 many mstance . " I wonder if _ ou kn w the name of th ' ma:n who was at Erst an unsucce s­fu I. andidate and then was elected a d irect or of the U. S. Ch a mb ~ r of Com­me rce. It was m father. Needless J t §a , F ath er ' . t hinking and -! in ions "\Were v ry largely shaped hom hi. fath­er ls- th founder of this ompany. · \Vh n I was ju st a yo\Jn:gst~ r I be­nan to l arn what it me n to be a ChampioJL T hi know led a · ~a s b ro ught t o me throufih overbeanng I I .. - • ... • Speakers table: left to riqht, Mrs. Elizabeth Koehler, Jacob Zeller. Mr. and Mrs. AI Rolfe, Mr. and Mrs. Scott Zoller, Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Randall; Mr. and Mrs. Homer Latimer. Alexander Thomson, Jr .. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Soule. Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Anderso,n, and Mr. and Mrs. Sam Collier. The staget Pictures of Peter G. Thomson. found r. and the tat cha.itm n. Al &ander Thomson, iD the background, and birthday e ke in the for qround.. (12) c nver a tions in my family and th rouo·h contact "vith fine men, such as Hom r Latimer, Homer F ercruson, l Rolfe, Charlie Soule, Ha rrr Ratliff and the r ·, t his at times when Father brow)"ht me to H:1mil ton on Saturdav < • morni ngs w visit in and around the mill. I 1 a rned to lik , appr ci~lt an I r pect th f ri ·n lly spirit h re, the fact t ha t hampi ns w rl and play one fo r c-dl a nd all f r one. In my t ravc lin ar )li nd thi - countn' I have L. • had many COilt't tS rith bu, in 'SS en-terp rises. large ·1n I small , an 1 n v r have I s · n or hear l of an 1rganization L ''h i ~ h can compare ith ours in spirit. T his , tu me, is pricl'le~s -- thc mo' t im­pnn ant fa ·tor in condu ting . tt cces - fu l b usiw~ss and in builclint' a happy JJ'gJ niz, ti n -uch 'l S , c ar bles~ 'd wit h. Tribute To All ·Tit o~l.' men and women " ho built lHllllj'i n and rna I it whaL it is ro­d. y are to be congratul:-t t ·d. and re­membered wid1 grati tud · ·and praise • A. bove left: Mt. Anderson reading leUers of reqret o·f those. unab<le to.. . atte.nd. Above right: Mr. Latimer at the hated "mike". Below: Guy Compton, left. installing Miss Elsa Reiff. Sec:re.tary. and Charles Soule. President. new otticers. (Vice President George Laugh was unable to attend.) for their ound con ru ctive thinkincr which brouaht the wonde rfu11y friendly feeling with hich \ e are surrounded. _ Iany hav pa ed on , unfortunately , but many m re a re t ill \ ·ith u . orne are no len er active in th" day by day activities b ut ' e ill have, happily, the b nefit · f th ir ad ice and their pre ence wi h us. '·To me there i no .. hin er so imp r­. nt a the re pect and li ing of one fur another and I trongl feel that we hould all of u , red dicate our elves tc• continu wh at has been o finely created and , if it i pos i le o do so, impro e on it. 1 · th inrJ' c uld n­vince me hat there is anythin r mor important to u. in ur rv rk-a-da · live tb..an th true Cham ion pirit and it i my tlrm intention and wilJ t · my ever pr ent endeav r to c ntinue at d f ter it. I mo t ince rely h0I t hav the advice and a i tanc of each and every ne of us . • 'Th r is a gre . deal m re I c uld ay on tbi ubje t but, a I t ld you, thi is not a time f r a Ion ' speech . 1 wa asked to. welcom you on this fine c:casion and I do v ith th hope that w may all me a · ain at an early date. ow let u enjoy ourselves as Champion always do." Champion Chorus One of the enjoyable features of the evenin o- was the singing of the Cham­pion Choru . This organization, started only a few weeks a o, i comp sed of about '"0 ''N ho like to sing". It is directed by Jam R. Simpson, who during his earlier years in Scotland had consid­erable exp rien e in this field. Paul Brecht is .ace rnpanist. fh dinn r " as th fir t publi ap­pearance of tlle ·hnru: and its rEt nd~­ti() n f a. I alf <lozet Cb ri tma car L' bn lght ornn: ndati n hom all. In­cidentally it a all ·d upon ' .., ·k la · r to ing cards in tb ivic s.in · o cr a 1 ;ud p · cr , y tern in th c n­t of the city. ~\1inut · o{ tbe or,, nization m Cl - ing of th Old 'I i ·rs cr · r ad by ~ s. Elizab ·th K0"hler, :;e · ret't . A list f th n1emb .r who ha e di 1 in h 1 s tw> e r · .1 r·ad by ~:1r. ' oule. 'fhc included 1<.\r"a et Thom..­a C. 'vV. J hn ' r." J hn H. R"' ~dy , J oe Br11nn r l Ed l\t1c ~ r i, ht, John 13. Ev r , H ·nry I. urk, J hn Oden, J a me C. iff en, William Kammon, (13} \ d Schuler, Ianzo Fitzwater and Tom Belew . New Officers Charle tephens chairman of the n ruinating ommittee reported it had n ruinated Charle Soule for president; Ceorg Lau h for vice president and F lsa Reiff for secretary. The report wa unanimously accepted and Cha rle and Nli s Reiff · ere immediately in­stalled by ·uy C mpton, Je r e be­ing unable t attend . .N1embers of the choru s, a majority of whom are non-members of the club, w nt t the Y.W .C.A. following their in ging where they enjoyed a special party. Members are : Carl !faupin , Emma Maupin, Elvy House, Edna House, Margaret Os­borne, Eileen Graff, Cl eada vVheeler, Ruby C pe, Florence 11escoe, Iris Ball, J anie Skillman, Virginia Hale, Bessie Nlainous, Geneva Rose, Frank Thomp­son, Nel on Benzjng, Marie Ho kins, Albert Gra ff, John Sipe, Idola Burch, Ada Karr, Chri stine Riley, Vivian Klotter, Eli zabeth Demis, B b Hacker, Ethel Current, Warren Current, Pat ri­cia Wick, Don Junkins., . Geo. Fergu­son, Vince Lauderman, Dana P ratt, Russell Pratt, Govan Begley, Merle Johnson, Roy vVhitaker, Wendell F1 h­wick, Stanley Haacke , Chester Manion Bert Winterhalter, Charles Polk, Ed Turnbull, Kenneth Faist, Betty Von Ste_in, Thelma Sandlin, Dale Bower, 1.tlarvin Puckett, Carrie Hensley F rank Whipple, Katherine Ross Anna H au ­bold, Frances Baker, Alcie Andrews, Muriel M. Allen Addie Reeb. Sgt. CorUss William Lobeide, ~:~on of ,William Loheide, Cafeteria. He has been in the air aupply division for 16 months and novt ia •'-· tlcmeci at Blackaton•~ Va. • am1 on Hamilt~. n 'hampi n hc1 h:l \ c in th~ mill 2.- H'<H" cr m n.:: TJr11b Zell r l~ha ·ks \ . · uk Cl. r. B l' ' 'l' H rry T. P 1Hi Li. : n .\ · 11h·~· G,_•t\r<.:c U. Cook • ]) nid \". Em ri ·k \.iii. Ill ". T ylor J. \'ilh rn ht1lfe ' l'hi1 ..:.:Jn,i,:lt I cub F. \ J :ncr ; )l: ,·rt 0. Rc :1<:' Dv ·1id :\1. ~baifcr klw -;_ Hu1e. ' La c Cr:n en . · ·l :\1. . \d. m: CJ ·c1 ce L. Pax on Eli:.c.l !-> > t h f.: oehle r Le~-.:.w G. ThNnson 1 e: se ~ I. · :nter ·l.une· H. ~ fu selman (]eor"C :\I. La u b Leona ... d'ont C. r nc C. Bartlett F•ed P. Iloobcr ... nford . 1. Hill John Q. ·oe· Paul K. Cartier Jula :\ f. Fulton A,1t"~lph Horn tein \ Iary A. :\1arr Bettie " .hitlock Charle~ K . \.illiams Alfred Anderson Jo eph D . Reed, Jr. Ora E. )lanrin_ J. Robert Chaml ers Loui.e Buehler Thoma ]. Lacey Robert Ketchem P aul D. Cook W. Scott Zoller Eu ene Carr Richard R us~ll Rvan • Cha rles Pierce hank f . .\1elvin Iva ~L Penwell Edward Keprler Ro c C. Korb Carrie Grimm Thoma F. D evine Guy Compton Cha rl ·s V. Stephens \'illiam D . . faupin harl e. Eel. Ellis Pa rrick C(,!l py Albert C. .\1ack James J. 'trick r Arth r F . ardncr .fohn F rauk H ixon C er1. Clifford <>r.~per Edw:t nl J· . Lud ·ke Clarence lfuut:t: Jicrbert W. Sutc·r \Vrn. C .. l pllC:nsun scar Pr,vnter J ', se L. Tack <)ll Ji lbc rt Jnm T h<.;r -sa L. ;w fJ i ·.c Edith L Ku11!rl · <~ n u I • 1. , \J I n \ infi ·ld J. 1· i~l. Chc:. tcr .. R.,bitJSon Robert . 1a i11t: Rnh rt L. Craycr· ft I lilda .\1 . ,rimm ' mu I Collier Rcrl; n A. Barker Con Collopy E:-t ]]a \ dlin~i1, t Cl tlwrin~..· l,. l c lZ l:"b L. k,•t 1f ;,n, n F. 1' ·cl ·y l !itn 111 1 . I u n L r R~,mnl...:,l lltn t Jt "q h :\ l ·()u.: n Ciint,,n I, u~h !. ~C:l'f·- ' .:\1. lkll E d\al't 1J. C.mer Rot' ·n 11. l'a ttcr;;on .\h in RuJdl 'r!l.1 1 hrbr(>ll J-r d .\ . ~~'iH'}" .k•hn \ . Lumford . lohn • . .:.'tri~er ~ Ed\ rd \ lint r Arthnr \'arman Chark: f. \ 'ehr Thoma$ ·G. Bb-ins jo:><Th G. Schultz Charles 1 J. R obin on -.· terh n S. Fanner Louis R . • \ pgar ,\ melia C. Labor Phil. Office Charles A. Labor Phil. Offi e John Tilford Storm ,u Florer Carl E. Buehling Barney H. Hall James \"ood R ichard J. Sherlock Frank Burns Chri t Schaney Sven Sandclius Jo.eph H a user George .\. Ga rve r William S. Guen t hner Eli Cope Bc,·erly House J ohn T. Hefl in Au!;ust J. Snyder ·n e()dore ]. D odt Rubert H. Johnson . 'elli Ilarbron Leroy T . Riley Car<>linc Doelln,an Henry J. Feyh K -Hneth L. Faist \1i 1Jr•d \ 1i ck.. Jo~~.:pbinc KrovcJch ck J (jllJI 1 JunJley \ 1 <HY Puthoff \'illi11 m f J. I k lil \ i11i<l1Jl llamm, J r. (;cun•e Petlui n ~ton CJ;,,;J V. \1t· ~n{·r .;;H jd' ll F. Hrun ·r. Jr. Onwr I .outdtn an j; rn · F. C il b(;rt Laura L11n fdJ,,w ht' J F, \'la n i 11 Fr·1mi I'... R i~..h; 1rds 111 B,·nj;Jill iru..: I i~..e Ea1! Tl ilcnwn !•.1!;1 l l ohb~ .J arn1· J idw r,I Puld) \ hry A. K iu~ ·I Burtull E. l>i. tlrl Lu()y C. f libnon Co rJ<Jn C. Faber ( htude l . fl ivhww r Elmer I [ ,~kin~ Blair R. t ttcr . l ik~.: 'c11a R bert ]. 1cK n i •ht Jolm Ho kin l'ltilil' \ 1" I lll,lll l'lt'll ) Ullhlill rlwm s I 1. \' 1 d l'nlllt.'lin,; I l<trdcbeck h 'I 'It Stq•h liS 'ltt>s ter '\ l <lt'l\' I I. n · 1 k n ~~ n Rny ,\11 n Eh 1 I lou~~.. Ct•• ·r~c 1 I. BakC'r ll.nr~ J. \ arcing Rolen K il~<'llf' .hs.c U urk)' luhn ::\k in~t'll ·1.1 111 ~ BuLner. Tr. \ illi.1 m \V. r ctclll:m R.,bina lc:ill Chctrley R icha d ,on LL' G. \ .inki er ,\ h ·a ' hradl r I· n• 1 t t '. Fr 1zu: I · . <' ~ I. F1>11 lu \ il!i.JIIl R, 'II· ) '""II \ \ ( ;jj\ k l ,lil Jl ' \ . h '\ ell ·J, l1n \. 1-:, an l (t~krt ( l. Ll.il· ThPlll,l~ LiLt)(• Cl:1rk :. lrS\ai l ~it11 H . .\ founcy ll ild:1 ~·mh rg _) Phn D. llardwilk Ora P. Miller \ \ 'illiam I Joskin:; l'l a rc·ncc R. Rcyno!Js \ 'il lia tn R. \Va t h n li u bert Farm er Thom<Js B. J acobi Ida M. 1 b ntilton MRS. TERESA PFEIL 1\Irs. T eresa Frances Pfeil, 74, died n December 2 at her home, 162 vVash­in ot on Street. She was the moth er of J ohn Pfeil, formerl y of the Machine Shop but now with the Seabees at Camp Parks, Calif. She al o leaves n vo other sons, Bede and Carol; two daughters, 1\!Iiss l\!Iagdalene Pfeil and 1\ Irs. George 'vVeber, and two sister s. Judge Knott-T he two men were fi ghting with chairs. Didn't you try to es tabl ish peace ? \Vitn e·s-No, Your Honor. There wasn't any third chair for me. TlME SERVICE BRINGS ADDED PAY TO 11 DURING DECEMBER l·.J '\ ·n 'kunpion h· d · tltomatic p· y iu,rra ... ·· during U•ccrnber be­caLL • f I he poli · ' r <i ntin,l! lwc per- ·nt DdUlt inna l at the b' rinning of each n ·w Jive year cy ·J ·. There \.\ere none in tla: five year ~n.J'lf' anJ O(Jll in the 2 S year 'ffJUp. T hose ~ hrJ u;m I cteJ 10 year· were: \Valt ·r Sc ballip J.::dna J acbnn 'harle v\. Stock Lucille John on Complet ing 15 year~: J. Edna Riley Cilbcrt F. Schulte Garrett Sharp Wo d Allen Completing 20 year : Lee Ho:kins Roy Sames Lillian Thomas MAKING POSTERS Pvt. Bill Fowler, formerly on the Scales, i doing his pecial bit for l·ncle Sam as a member of the po·ter depart­ment in the EAAF recru iting cam­paign. Bill, who i an arti st of unu ual ability, helps to prepare the po· ters and his camp recently sent out cads of items about the work and tho·e who do it. Bill 's picture was in the 1 t. John R IU. Jr .. (left) formerly of th Storeroom. now HA 2/ c, Great Lakes. flL Johnny rec ntly came to Hamilton on short furlouqh and qre ted friends in the mill. tellinq h xperiences in a hospital, which proved of unusual lnterest. Pvt. Elbert P. Fral y (riqhtl formerly of the Box Shop and Reela, now In C Co, IS 5th W., APO 31, Camp Plekett, Va., ASN 35872663. H1a wlte, NetUe, la on C M Sortln9. (14} C M CUTTER GIRLS' BIItTHDAYS B Otto R eid The ai d s on t he C :Nf Cutters con­tinue to celebrate bi rthdays with s-ur­pri e gifts, Llo. d Furman came down suddenly with a ppendk iti and no . witl1 a lear head h t lL the 1110 t and th tall · , rie we e-v-er heard from under th " ether. Bar . n l\i'u.nchh.au en would t urn "~"reen with env could h h ear th · m. Ray t ffen 1s e& c dingl. · enerou_, in ma ing a bet. ,!l_aybe h ha" a r 11 alted away o he alwa s gi e th '~ ad­vantao- e to th · oth r f lloV\ -........;in a b t , But with many apoloo-i he c lls later for hi dough-the bl ke, he ne er lo . u )) (( (( Pe ple are allergic t the mo t cu­liar thincr(. Now take ou r T m -Hen. Tap rum on he head \'\1ith a b lackjack and be will , hake it off and grin. But a ma U piece of ice dropped ~ecretly into a hip pocket of tho"e ~p acious 0 eran· can do wonder, to the cu tom­ary serenity of our Tom. )} )) « (( THE FLAG THAT ~EVER LOAFS I ain t no bloomin~ expert On the thino-- we -oughta do, nd I ain't no . ao-e pr'""dicter On mo-t thing a com .. in' t rue But rn tel1 yo:u like a brother 'Cau e that' the way I druther The flag w-ill never quit Defending you 1 . »»«~ \Vh.en things are scar.c€ it takes in­genuity. V\7 e , •alk-ed in o a store re­cently and found Fayette Garrett and Cl ~de !v1ocm~ standing oliclly atud sp~ead out b efore a small d isplay counter. And F ayet e had his hat -on the cou nter. Tht" i what he said : "I ve been in every ore i11 town l Jolcin(..r for a good heavyweig ht p(,";cke knife. The re' . ne in rhi contrap ion . and no one else buys it -or s e i until I m waited on. ' He crot the knife. tl )) « « Pat Collopy . wa in th ho pjta,l f:or sev€:r.a1 days recerrtly. He say" hi ail­ment is a ~ ecret · ven to tl d . ctnr . ''\Vbate er it was/' h said, 'jt had me buffal0ed and the dr-.1c o rs baffled." )) »· « (( " l7ncle J e" Pigoott lov es hi pipe. He reminds you of the Fr nchman tp­ping wine: iL being twice rhe fun t smoke lei ur ly for- ·an hour than it would bet J m ke rapid ly 30 n inute . » ")) " (l Jrm G( eb el, Machine Shop, ha a nephew in· Sicily and points east1 west and north . "Big R ed'' Ward was some uy in peace and we don't en y Hi~l er the job of stopping an army like hun. )) )} (( (~ H re' to Paul 11Iick in. a f g, \Vho alwa · rate ' a line in 'I\ IE Loc. He ti 1 ~ t ur ·rib like corn on th cob' And ah ay will whil ·M icl h as a job. MORE ENTER SERVICE Th b 1lowing frorn Hamilton Divi­ion ·nt r d the arn1ed servic s la, t month: H ar ld J iner , Naval R eserve. Percy Pete rs, U. S. Navy. Y enneth B rown, Marines. Robert E. Dallmer. Hubert E. Crane. · Cha rle · Little, U. S. Navy. James Poe. ~~J a r vin Hayes, U. S. Navy. Had en H arnilton, U. S. Navy. Suspic-ious \¥ ife:-:--'\Vhere ·have you been all evening? . · · Husband-I've been t alk ing business \ ith T orn Baker. "Yes! And I .suppose t hat is bak­ing powder sprinkl ed all over your shoulder?" ' -- - 1~uth Brown ~- eceived a lovely gold bra ·det on D 'C mber 4-rh, from the fo ll in r o·irl : Permi.lia York. Bessie Lloyd, Irene R ber Besg Lot~, Rach­el F owl r, Lttlu Dunn, Ruth Cloyd,. fJ"ora P1 er n ] o F oll.i k, H 1 n Schar­er Lu ille John-son, Nl a tt ie Hooke r, Elsie An lerson, Ethel Rutherford, Ro ~ e I rb, Faye Mullen, Sophie YcJtm rr·~ and Kathryn } ain. Bes ie Ll yd also. eel bra ed her birthday on December 4th and r-eceiv­ed a gold locket and pin, h om the fol­lowing girls: Irene Roberts, Ruth Brown, Dora Pjer on, Hilda Nienaber, Ruth Cloyd, Ethel Rutherford, Elsie Anderson, R os.e Korb R achel Fowler Sophia Young, F aye Mullen, Flo Boh­lander, Nia tt ie Hooker, Joe F ollick, H elen Schae r, and Lucille Johnson. For h er birthday, Rachel Fowler re­ceived a bed spread sh eet , and towels from· Zena McGee, Bess ie Lotz, Rose Korb, Lucille J ohnson, E1 ie Anderson, K athryn Kain, Helen Schroer, Ethel R etherford, Etta Small ey, Mattie :Hooker, Ruth Brown, Bes ie LLoyd, Joe FolJ.ick) Hilda Nienaber, Faye 1ul­len, Permilia York, Lulu Dunn, Flo Bohlander, I rene Robe.r ts, Ruth Cloyd, Dora Pier 'on, and Sophie Young. 'two fO'rmer bud.dlea Qn c: M Tri'mtners and althouc;rb tlOW widely separat:ed. real bu~dies in the servwe. . On the left is Cpl. Al McGulte. Cue Postn!aat•, New YoTk.. who wriles that -.hUe ~g~d ia a beautih:rl country there's nothinq to be compared to the U. S. A. a:nd ChaJll.pion. _On the ri'tlht is Pvt. John W. Stone. nQw in Oald• nd. Calif. Hia address ia 3$679840, Btry D. 257 AAA (Auto WPNS Bnl. 52th and Te.ltqraph Streeta. (15) Left: Miss Evelyn Sharp, 2/ c, formerly of C M Clockhouse. s~nt a short furlough here re­cently after training with the SPARS. She entered the service in June and has been sta­tioned at Palm Beach, Fla .. where she attended • tons CPL. TOE CREECH, APO 635, Care Po tmaster, . ~ew York, 1\. Y.­Pictures bring back old memories and I am glad to ge them. It's a f('rand feeling to have friends like the Cham­pion fami ly. I visited a rag paper mill in Scotland. I t is quite different frr m Champion . PFC ROBERTS. PYFRL ', 35801.- 168, Hq. Co. 3rd Bn 272 Inf.. PO 41 7, Camp , helby, ~v1i~s.-1 received a writin r kit ands thank frJl it. It i gett ing (;o(er do vn her 11ow. in be qui te cr;ld . Th 'Y work 11 ~ pl ·nty aml f ed us pl ·J ty so that ·en.) thing up. : 1A. 'CY SPOERL, S 2/c, Hill er 22H B, Sec. 5-32, l S~TS ( 4-\V) Cedar FaiL. lm\a-).Jany thanks for Txm LoG each nH nth. It\ the bc . .,t \ ay of gcning Champion news I know of and J mly hupe it keeps omi1 g re ularh. ou ~e' I am :;tationecl (JUt her· {n th · f1at (J l 'T ET :-:.tate of 10\v<. It pos :esse: rnor · <.: rn field and lc ~ activity than crond old Ohio bu r it's a nin:' place to be loca t d, re ardlcss of the hulk­lwadin~ · ( gri r ing to you) \'C do. 1 ·til l hav•n't \·VOrkcJ up to admiral bu give school to become a storekeeper. She is the daughter of Luther Sharp, No. 2 Rewinders. Center: Sanford Garrison. now a naval gunner. for­merly of C M Calenders. He is the son of ' r o a. me time. I think the day I receive my chevron will be a p roud a day a I ever will experi ence. I'll flaunt it proudly in the eyes of a ll the guys and gals in al . LT. ( jg) OR~ 7E L1 LT BETTE.-, .I R., US. 'R,' care Fl 'Ct Poc·to nl ce. ~e v-r York, 1'\. Y.-Your I tte r a ldrcssed to me at P arl Harbor fina lly ot up witb me em this . ide of the w rid at \Jew York. All of the gifts fr >m 'hnm ri n are very murh <q•pa· ·iatr I. 1 n all the · time tak ·n in try in tCJ ~:c a bi()' : hip c h r i ned, t h cr c lJ a. h c · n I itt It: t i m c f()r len er "'ritin''· P I·C Cfl!\RLI'.S SiBE RT, i\PO • o. I, va r • P(J ·rrna It r, . ~w Yo rk, ~­) .- ·r kml · f<Jt th~.: l ~~.·atk r':i Di •es t. 0\'c r ht '< i1 i pqplll:tr \ ith a ll the buy and (r)pie ar · Cl)\ t;tinll ly 'llrl.rd­t d. Ri rhr nr 1\ \ • rt' I :n in~ a r •sr pe1 ioJ \ hidt erh hlc. !'llt' fO at ·h ''Pun m) {)fr • ~I(Jfldcnc •. . '/. c;T_ Hl .'TO. P \ ER . P 7~0. 'an: Pn ·tma:-t 't. '\ ~ urk-.\t l he mument 1 am " Jtione l omt:\ her c in :iuly. I }Ht\ e ecn pit: nt~ of chi. wurld bu lon't let <tO\' 1!1 • tell \ >U • • (16) James Garrison , Pipe Shop, and nephew of Shirley Garrison. Watchman. Right: Cpl. Ralph C. Miller. formerly on the As­phalt Machine. now in the army. His father, William R. Miller, is in C :•1 Shippinq. • 1 on th at you haven't got anythin. in your own back ard that will beat anything a broad. I have , e n place. practi­ca lly untouched by ,-a r. the p ople ca rryin g on almost a usual, but any little ld \vide pl ace in th • road in the ·vs has got all f them . hov I If the map. Rnn int le- Th m s~. n a t ai ro and the w rk h and oth ers a r J oing f · r the soldi ers is nlo:;s. I. PVT. I LPH R. D(r'\ ,.\ . ' .. '\P 76-, a r J stmas tc r. :\n\' York, ~. ) .- \' · :;hall I all \ c c:• n Ill rc for ! ·npl who do s) m. 11~ thin g-:'> ft )r u · thn '. ~fJn y th anks for tlJ · fin e gift ·. S / I'. ROl ERT L. F . ~ I•:L . \ P 7 1 ~, C:~.r · Po:-. rrn a~ t ·r, :-;an Francis·­T n m '' d > V\ n under" <lll d i 11 f1 r • s hap l' . Vle '()( tl (.' Jars Of llCJ'(' I c . ~ ) \HI ' n p rob ;:~ bly sc ·. Ha\'1? se ·n : '\' ·ral pbc- , nd lots ) t ccan sin ·· I 'il in • the ' good old USA. Saw P,tn •tm a. T o1 J<l-t bu. 1 '\<\' Hebri cs nJ uite , f ·v. m ) n t h s in blnn ly. mo nnai n w: . ~ \ a m~ y, di scas inf ·:> rc 1 ~ uad a k a n a l. l 'tm rl 'in the re:it a re,. )u r dead budd y. , -l()hnn.r (Sin ' rktt n ) did his be,'t and was ,. ' r. busy cx lt' nnin, ting J aps hen he left u,. \Ve were in the ia · t battl befor ·curing the 1 Jand , .h n v e 1< · t our very be 't paL T 11 lik" Faber l 'll pr babl b ba k t the o-ano· when we et int the ,olden Gat ometime in '4 . "'G1 . . DDI L. CARPENTER, Care I "tma t r, J 1 Y rk N. Y.­S rr I can't t ll y u where I am. but that i rictl tabo . H ever I like it ·er . mu h: but it' far from th old ~ t Inf ing . r und. Our et ur i un.- u ·ual. 0 f d uppl doe not de­pend n ·what i · brouaht fr m th tates. \' e fell v liv in ar a l?nown a ~ h steL and ur v ·ant ar tak · n are f by Chines c kin , bedmaking t . . o w nl do th ' r1 f r \ hich ' ' ·e \Vere trained. Tell all th fell hell and l t this he a r~'Ierr Chri_,t­ma~ . PF RICH RD F. D LL!viER 1 PO ( 7 ar Po tma ter Nev Y rk ~. Y.-\' ar now in En l nd and th p ople here tr ·at u.. ' ell. I am gla to re ive THE L G and HIPS CPL. D U A R D IcELRA EY PO 464, Care Po ~tma ter, ~ ew York, 1 .... Y.-Our utfit i~ '- aining r coo-ni­tion all ov 'r he ' orld for its ability to et up beach operation while under heavy fire. ~ 1aybe thi ~ 1 the reason Left: Pfc. Stanley Hines, formerly of the Produe· tion · Depvtm.ent. iii the husband of Viola Hines, C M Sottinq. · Center; Pvt. Nelaon MenilL statio~ at Marine Bar· f r all f Lh u c s es made to date o er here in this th atre of war. W are pr 1d of · ur r rd. Give the o-ang in 1 . 2 shipping a supply f pap r and p n ils a. they arc behind in th ir writin . CPL. J A~t!E 11. FOWLER APO 6 ... 7, Care P tmaster New Y rk, N. Y .-Sine my last lDLt r I have mov d t hina and a r ading h r i very arc', the Dig t will b r atly ap-pre iated. PFC EARL B R H APO 469, ar Postrnastcr, New York, N. Y.- 1 hav b en · anting to write for s me tim' but und r certain conditions it h be n imp ibl to do o. I wear m) ood Luck piece and I am su re a lu ky man to be able to write this let­ter. I have s en some nice places and hav s ·en plenty to make your hair tand up. Guess Joe Schultz i pretty sore about the Yanks beating the Cards. Letter al o were received from: A/C Paul Hershner, Group 23-B, Sq. D Flight 2, Bombardier Wing, Ellington Field, Texas. Sgt. Wn:i. A. Lipphardt, APO 634, care Postmaster, New York, N. Y. Lt. G. A. Meehan, 317th Sta. Hos-racks, N.O.B. Key Weat, Fla ... is the acm of Martha Gr1>te, No. 2 Fan and Count. Uld a cousin of Ruth Brockman. C M Sottinq. RiCJht: Cousins froft) the mW. U!d now in service, (17) pital, Camp Atterbury, Ind. Pvt. George F. Schneider, APO 5 50, are P strnastcr, New York, N. Y. Pvt. Th mas Hundley, APO 528, care P stmaster, New York; N. Y. PFC Elmer •'. P tts, APO 71 8, ca re Postmaster, San I• rancisco. PFC Thomas L. Ziliox, A PO 730, care P tmastcr, -w York, N. Y. Pvt. Earl Hedge , Camp B, 14th Bn, IRTC F rt McClellan, Ala. Pvt. Clyde Me Daniel, APO 472, care Postmaster, New York, N.Y. pl. Jam sM. Thompson, APO 726, care P stmaster, S attle, Wash. Cpl. eil Bartel, APO 851, care P stmaster, New York, N. Y. PFC Wil on Browning, APO 502, care Postmaste r, San Franci co. S/Sgt. Albert R. Hirsch APO 520, care Postmaster, New York, . Y. S/Sgt. Douglas S. Gallacher, APO 467, care Postma ter, New York,~ . Y. Cpl. Charles L. Dea:m, APO 63 5, care P ostmaster, ew York, 1 • Y. Pvt. Wm. L. Fowler) 1043 BFTS Enid Army Air Field, Enid Okla.- 150973 34. ' are Pvt. Merle Kelley. son of Cloyd Kelley, C M Trimmers. and Pvt. Fred Kelley, from No.2 MtU Calendera and Rewinders. Merle i.a sta­tioned at Ft. Knox. Ky .• and Fred ia somewhere overteu. Putting- m\ ear dt•\nl t Lht gr un ~ . ~ to hear \·bat i- '"uing nn in :1leml ·r- ~ dom thi - m nth. it da\ ned < n me that Father Time had talen an~1thcr year. • \Ye h<n· all had out: llr - and d wn . Let us prot!t b~ the past and res h ·t:: to make 1 ++ a better and a haf pier year f r all. »)«« Talkin a at ut r s lution . her i ~ one Your- Truly w uld like to pas n . "Resolved: That 1f I can't sa ,- some- J thing cr d ab ut anv ne. I \- n 't a r '-' . am.- thin ·· b re oe . '- }}~f((( Calenderd m 's fu~ t roman e : Dai y Billiard and Elmer Farmer ~~·er mar­ried Thur-day ~ 1 m-em ber 1 ) by the Rev. Brinkman. Congratulations. Bill ~Iaupin a lover of outdoor -ports, ·was repairin his hor e hoe court "'·hen he espied a boy with a mule and a cart. Boy r11 gi,-e you 0 cent to haul me a couple of load of clay" he said. "That ain't much, ~ 1i ter," said the boy. • Hmv far do you think you'll have to haul it," asked Bill. ' I thought I'd have to go all the way to Clay County," said the boy. » )} « (( Lloyd (Pet) Baker, formerlv of C I\1 Rewi_nder , wa married r ~ently in Hamllton to a California girl. P et is Pvt. Dillard Saylor, brother of Alva Saylor, C M Calenders. The pieture waa taken with hla aunt, Mawle Lo9aclo alao of th• C&lenclert, .1 mcchani in the ' 1 mY Air ' orp ' . ""'m)rtrGtu lation s. ) (( (( akn I rd("fl1 h ~t · a r 'D. I hampiou . Little \Vi llie .\ bram: b ast that he can h u~k 165 bu ·hels nf corn in on day, take f ur rows, I 'ep three ca rs in the o.ir :~nd keep a tra tor in ond gear fulling th e wag n. Wh n Little Willie grow- up he eith r will bring home a gold husking peg or b president of the Tall ~' t o r lub. )))){((( P · a rl (B roth r) l\/f ays paid a visit t the Calender room lately. Brother, who is alway ready to oblige with a good tory or a little fun , took time out to gi e nna Denny a lesson in calis­thenics. Brother told Anna that after a fe, hundred time, you just didn't mind it. }) » « ({ The rumor is going around that Charlie Schell has a small place in the country with 40 sheep, 200 hogs, 14 milk cows, 7 coon dogs , and 9 boys. I ot bad at all, Charlie. I t hink he also should be a member of the Tall Story Club. · )) )) (( ( ( l\tferle l\tfcSwain, forme rly of C M Rewinder , is wearing the blue of the Navy. fiis address: Co. 175 , u.· S. Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill. )) )) (( (( Olab Walton, that good natured run­ner on To. 5, Reynold' shift who can ing the chant of the tobacc auctioneer like nobody' busincs ·. i · alwa doing thin :; and oing plac in a hurry. f ·w day ago be ru . h d to tht.: batb room for hi daily h:n· , o-rabb d a tube h thou ht c maincd ::,having cream and 1 roce d cl ith t h w r1 in hand. h ha inc• ere am turn ·d u to be tooth pa l . F (Jr awhil h thought he was Jwvinr• t-1-in, whisker and all. Lat r, L ·s _Jd nt}r' tJld lah not t(J \"\'( rry, rhat h · had wl ' I.Hd hi . :fac (Ji with a dish ra1f. ur") 1 d1dn't wa h th tup ()( yuur n l · •in, t >o,. L ·? v isr f ld o~ I . ~11 un an o k; 'II e mor· he ~m, the 1· he ~ r~uk; Tl e ]e - h S! ok ·, rh' r urc he h · r 1- \7h! ,1en't we l ih~ rlt t \ ·is td hi rd? » » « « H· ppy nd a Pro p rouo ~ ew ar to 11. (18) Pvt. Edward W. Frey, formerly in the C~t DepartmenL His adruess now is 35803231, Company E, 13th Quartermaster Trg. Rq1., Camp Lee, Va. THE FLEET FOOT TRmE The hikers got rained uut from hik­ing the night of November 15 but that didn't dampen anyone's pirit from enjoying the evening and the food that was served by the committee, Alice Hogan and Mary Bur , at 1\!Iary's hou se. The hike of 1ovember 29 was in charge of Edythe Beall and Ethel Cu rrent. The hikers made their wav out the ' Eaton Road and then aero ~ to the Darrtown Pike and then to Edvthe-' home. Pl an - \Vere discu sed f r the hri st­mas part Dec mber 13. Th sc pre- nt be ides th ommit-t ' ere: lara bell Hall, Stella \Y !l­in hoff, El a \Vehr C nni · row nsell, E th cr , trapak, Helen 'a ·ers Ruth P w '11 ' fuli a Bennett 1 !fillie Borp· 'r- .__ ' \-.. n, J enni j " Iar, d -·l F, bcr, Betty. ~ ve r.- ' th r ~r ss ' II ' in<l fbn merl •, ori' Ja nc Henning r, fary .H I, 1nri . K a tin g, 1 tty L ·~ i ­hr k an 1 Wilda L II id e. - illic Borge r nn. KIN OF CHAMPIONS MISSING IN ACTION E l u S ·h ol r r., , n of Ed ar ' . • ·hnr l", ,' r., l inh0din ·r and .,t k I i ·ging hu · b en rq rte 1 mis -in in , eli n ft 11 wing bombing raid over ' rr I :lily. H \ as a tail gunn r n · 1~ I) in F rtr . . br th r .' ldon, · . 1 R wind r , al o i in the r i e, · nd an th r br thcr, Jo ph is in th Tran fer I ool. CHAMPION'S REPRESENTATIVE IN ENGL D BOON COMPANION PFC Richard F. DaJlmer. formerly t1f the H amilton plant, !1011\' :->omewb re in En ~land . ha written hi fath r ' liff Co:1pe r, of the unu ual cou rt v and the flne ompa nionship aH rded by Perc)· l". Paetz, Champion' ~ r pre­. entatj,·e in that c untr ·. Hl' is an Encrlishman but li\'c l in Hambnqr. Cermany, bef re the war, ·'makin~r .. all of Eur re in hjs ~;:de . trJv l . ~ l r. Paetz contacted Di k b letter • an l the btt r met him in Londnn ''"here he \a - :::h( \'11 the sight.. He is re {tie.:: tin~ that all Champions cnnt act him if r 1s~ib l e and i ~ as u red all \ill r ceiYe Lhe t1ne treatment he t.;Ot . ' \I r. PJ.etz ha bi. office and hom iu. t out:ide the uburb. nf London, a hom 16 mil fr m ~I a rvlebone and • Paddimrton tations. '" CAPT. TRUITT IN ITALY ,\n article publi -bed in the \Vestern Pacific Railroad' maQ'azi ne, called the 'Headli ht'', r~ad" as~ follc•ws : ~ - ~ TE\Y ACQl-AI:-\TA_ ~cE : Letter to \I. \Y. Ro~ er (Traffic) from Capt. John Truitt (A:--t. General Trf. Mgr., Champion Paper and Fibre Company, Hamilt n. Ohio) tell of h; ~ meeting Capt. Henry tapp (Trainma ter) in :icily, and continue ' ith: "Henry cerr · to be a nice fello but that s all the \r. P. have: i n t itf': You're right, apt. John. but then l\.1alco1m, Len _1aru er and Joe Bunker, unde rstand \ ~u al~o ... are a re ular fellow. • BECOMES ARMY NURSE ~ 1 i-- Cecilia Ev r~mann, 1712 Edi­- 1ll Avenuc1 expects to be as igned the middl_ of -Januarv. to her station as an ~ rm nur e. _ 1i . Ev r man ha'> been ::.: nur.:;e at the Hamilton Di \.·is ion f r 1 S nwnth . ORN IN FORT HAMILTON HOSPITAL To. Jr. Clarence r.JV>, y, 538 Pry­tania ... \.Yenue~ a da1r7hter, Donna Loni c. T(, _ h . ... -urman Coor.1~, 1240 Park .h· 1 uc, a ( n, \'illiam \ ' rncr. To \'1 r . Tony \Villi , 24 S(, 1th Str e , a on, Han ld \' ay ne. CHILD IS TAKEN Ci ro H uey, the l VC .. ' ccu-~ olJ on (Jf . 1r. and .\I r . . Cicero H 1cv, died on .·()\ember 15 of C!D unu ua·l maladv. ] le \'a. th rand on of ~1 r~ . 'a rrl Huev and , 1m 'a re • 'o. 2 ' utter • wa - a great aunt. Brothers in the service: Pvt. John H. Maddox. arms crossed, Troop C 23. OMTMT Sqd., Fort Reno. Oklahoma. and Pvt. Chill Maddox. Navy Pier, Great La._~es, Marine Air Corps. They are brothers of Mrs. Lola Crea.ch. C M Trimmers. • • • • I IH oans an roans_ By PomPom I trust everyone had a Merry Christ­mas and not too big a New Year's Eve and your heads are all down to the natural size again. Let's all make an extra effort to bring the boys home for next Christmas and all yea rs to come . Their coming home makes each hour of waiting a moment of thrilling anti­cipation of the time when we can be togetber again. So let's tr. a little harder more often and ma kc it come tn1e in 1944. » )) (( (( Kirkpatrick to k a week's va ati n t(J d rabbit l111nting with only fi shell · It n Yer the lc:;s am· back with fiv · rabbit s. All y(Ju rabbit br cd­ers b Lt 'f h k y ur hut h ·s. Th r"' isn't any moral to thi ~ stor ', ju t con­clu i ns. )) )) (( " "SuC"t -h ad \' ri~ht '' \·rants all n w­comcrs to kt )\' h is still in th ' \ ar­pin .r bu iness. Ilis la st J ·al was a p ir of loaded eli 'C that went )fT ' it h a bang with tn >n ·y in ' lud' L So right fl()\V he i. ju ~ t . \arpin' jok s. )))){(( Carl 1'" ehr and Clan'n Youn • are lo )king for man r w man fur Llt · truck pit (in ·) \how nt make s darn many I i ·, kc:. \V 11 boys, the 09) per ~ on you are lookincr for has never been employed and Houdini won't mes around with truck drivers. So just consider us as a dud and some day we will go off \Vith a bang on the right path. A ... h, the eighth wonder. )) )) (( (( Person Quotations: 'I ki lled a seven-hundred pound hcv~ and o-ot 260 pound, of lard and 90 pound sa u age. '.' mith. 'I feel o bad I don't even v:ant a d r.m k· . " - T.1 e. "Ev ry tim I 0 et down in the other room they giv me ~hat darn old buzz- . ,, p ·t - 1. - c c. ' No, m y w i f didn't s n d you a piece of ak' to-d~y, Bitt rs, but I'll gi e y u an apple."- ._ imps n. ' I want brand f t bac no one ·wi ll chc\ x pt me.''- u] . ''T h )pe s m . n' give· m a h el for Ch ristma .. '- Iri ·. " I d n 't fe '1 1 i k e d l i n a hi n ~ to- L. , do· anyone kno\ any ne rro- s.t p.? ' - I) at. •\You c uld b · lik · me if you tried ." -Lu ' ille. '\:Vhat s the differ n , w' will all h in the army h f r 1 mg c nyhow.' - Kiem. Champion achine hop ~ ome\,·hcre in tht St uth Pt~ ~111c a PT boat i. ~kimmino- the " ·att:' it :earch of .l pan 'Se raft, 11 ~uard lut\' 1-0 w ~rl' k: r'r mayb,, lending a lnnd in ~ me mi 'Thty Iandin~ operati n. Perhar·~ in th t PT i-, a ~tc 'l Bhaft t)n ''hi ·h :- me of 1 he mac 1ine " rk w;t- dl' l1 in th" harnpi ·,n ~'lam at Ha nilt 1 • 1r it m, y b a Di s 1 ro"­erl' i .'l.Jbm. rinc or a nH. r(ktnt ,·hip. or a Je,·iath, n cun.· in ,. . •d, t the "11 -:ht- ~ '- • at the fr nt 0r .::u~-.pli c t :~u r me me 3.llies. .:\o\ or he fir:t tim much of the t:.tory of Champion': participation in the 1achining of parL f r the.e ,hips can be told. Cen, r ~ hip at \'ashing­t n ha, pre\·enred publication of the facts and there \·ere man' e\·en in the • plan at Hamilton who kne\' little or n thing of the work beina done. The part that paper and pulp have had and will continue to ha,·e in the prosecution of the \·ar are well knm11m. \Yithout them the war could not long • continue. oon after Pearl Harbor, it was de-ermined to accept machine work for the Hamilton plant. There was need for machine tool· of all kinds to make the actual material required at the front . Trainees immediately were put to work and many regular machinists, through a rearrangement of jobs, were placed exclusively on "war work". The e tra i nee~ were put on defense job. and in the Champion voca­tional chool pecial blueprint reading and hop mathematics were popular cour e . Tt alc;o was nece ary to make some change in the hop itself to a commo­date the nc1v type of work. ·or in-lance it was t o much of a load for the line ' haft mr;tor, so the larg lathe had to b driven with a 40-hors -. power m -t r andVbel. Th f1rtbigj()b a forth·R.K. LeBlond Company in incinnati [()r rlaning lath bed sections of which H w r • tini: hed, working in thr • .s hift>.. Lcn?lh of th ·. c tion · wa from 12 i(} 20 feet, the \Veiuht from t\H a1 d a half to four ton . '1l1e plan ·r on wl1i h the work wa. done wa 30 yea rs old. It had to b reworked and rei ·vel d. DriVL· haft weighing 70 ton. and more. \ •re m chin · L The joh of h n~lrn r th:~ hug- J'~ icce s rc 1uir d .re ral contnvance \ hi<.h' ere ri oo-ed up in the , hop. ' The \·c.>rk in lud ;,d wnH: ~P cia! job n rna hmc:s nr th • nl'tnufactUrt.! of urned to War Purpose . ~ ntlH'ti rul b_·r. ,(, wh ·n )-!lll i-!C on· of tb<.'::- • n '\V tJr. \Oil an riJ' a litrl · ca: on th<. thougl{t that it< mld hav· bcu maJ th rou~h u~' of m. d1i11Cr) turn ·d < ut .tt Chamri n. Thi!' . ub c ntract w< r \ o tk ·till is bL in~ carried n. The c(Jn t racts w r · 3 \ <u\led I ' the .:\ ·run ·a J\ i1 craft,. ·lid- • dlct(mn; Hc,·i:-. .:\La·l1in Company ~ .:\Iiddlet )wn; Shartl' Bro . . , liddle­to\, ·n; Lch ld :l.t Cin inna ti, and from H a milton. the Black-CJaw,' tJ!l 'om­pany. Econom. Pump C mpany, Cen­era l lachinery Coq oration, Liberty Pl aners. James A. ~1urf hy Com~ any. MISS MARIE TRAGESSOR I\Ii s· farie Tragessor 20, R. R. 5, died in 1\.Iercy Hospital , December 8 following an illness of several months: She formerly was on C l\II Sorting. She le~ve_s her fat her, Henry; a siste r, Faye "1lkms and nvo brothers Robert and Herbert Tragessor. ' • • I• a Pvt. Charles W. Arnold, formerly of Roll Storage, now is on foreign soil. His address is APO No. 36, care Postmaster. New York . By Patty Hammerle ] anuary-The beginning of a new year, and Jet us all hope that this year will be bri hter and better than the ~ast. The on ly way for t his to ha ppen IS for us to buy more and mor war bonds. January i also the month of re elu­tion and '"'·e schedulers made a few resolution s. even though mo t of them ha,- already been broken, \V ·till call then new y a r re olutions. L1 Jyd Hagga rd has re lvL•d to it duwn a l c .:~ ~t twi e a day. Thi ~ stan.d­intr all day i gc ttin r him dm'\O. 'o h ays. \.fa ry .\Ja..,on h:t: dcciJL'd to !.! L to I get to \.\ork on titnt'. Th · tim· ·lo<..+ \'ill f:dl dc1\ll \dwn th .. n bapp n:. J r d I ' n p u \.\ t •J ,j n d 'I (I i l \ . ( M ' r ·- '-()) \.. Ill fl :t\l'l <1!11. h~ r lant·. I U'l'llt· I) thq t(111k " little j•n111 CJ\' r to ln ­Jianap( jli vi .. t •tir. t 1 e · thr in tT\' tlf'. It\ a tire 1irt-.l ti.rne liP for lf ell'TI; 11d h · !-aid .. ,,jnl! u\ n Itt· l«ttl l!n 't lltll"l · c,u.~~J. hut cotni ll !! bnck shl Jid pt>~tl 2 llr 3 \rorJ . I i dt·n :-lll e m11st h<.t\T he ·n :m .. . trickl:n, bccatbl' it i.:. Jt'< llv -..urnc>thing wh 'O , h~.: i"n 't t:dl...inl!. '\il jc.1ke ·,ide. Jf·ltn ~nd hin." Tt·:dh h.. d a Wilttk·rful tim~ and intend tn ,;) < vJ.Jrl in de n 11 tt o Ji n future. (20) Frank \ hippie has rc ok d to bu\' Frank Crossley a set of tinker wy:. Ever playful Cro~ 1 y practically kn eked \Vhi pple~ blo k off '"ith a paper vvad and eve r siuc Frank ha :­been afraid f Cro sle\· and he fe ·L ' a set f tin1·er toy would keep him oc upied durino- hi lei, ure h urs. \Ye of th ,ch ~dule. in the ab ' enct of Ru.c 1e \lclnt ' h, \'allnce Fo: rt_· · nd Lt• ' D( ell man, hav made their re~· c; luti ons fur them.-Rc:\oln·~ l that thcv. write us a 1 ·ttn nO\ ·md th ' ll. \Ve hav n't hal a letter from rh ·m for Oh so long-\'h , don 'r v u \.vrit ._ fel - ' • J I )\1': ~ l a d · ,, u1 e1 res tlves to :w-;\ cr ti1L· t e k 1 h on c en· r y t i rn c i 1 r i 11 ~ :-;. He i::. !! 'lli ng sn tire l f pet1pk ~: t) ing" [ark l llh\Vl'r th · tl'l '11ht ne". :\ Ltr) 1·:. S ·h\ ing re!:luh r.~ tu become < 'lalmir~tl · l1h'dd.\ . B v. thctll11l'' ,(ll read 111 i.., :\ I a rv I·: lien \ill b · a ftrll ' Jl ·lll• ·d \ \ \ 1·: (l f l · 1t c I ~· ~: t m ':-; : •r . I. ( 't · of I tiL' k, \ l :-n \ J.: lien , <Ill d \ \' ' "u ;. dt> n1i ss } CHI, : 1 It ~If!} llJ' :tllLL \in the w,tr , nd orne back t11 ~t 11) l >I ~ dl~d- u le. ' \ til. I hav · ramhl ·d ntt lnnl!: cnt>ugh 'lnd. aid nnrhinlr, . o I'll si~ ll (Jfr. \rite a I ·tu.·r to , fJlll\.'onc in the :-il.!;-vi~.--c--n( t tom orr o\, not tonight, b11t r · h1 nuw. oar a e By RAY GARRETT Hamilton journal- ews ports Columnist Bunny shots. dribbles and rebounds from Champion's basketball doings ... In the cu tomary \ armup tage · for a few' •eck~. "Y': Sh p 1 a ue basket­t all ha Jelinitely ru~hed it "·ay into the Hamilt n .:p ns r i ture for a len(l'tln 'taY and it look like an th r l annr~ season for Ch mpion:s promi - . m~'" entrY.. . For an) tearn to go through as mur­d r us a .;;.chedule a' the on facing the Creen \'ave in the ropub r \. ednes­day night lo p without bein(T bumped t1rl e or tv~·ice . or more, is al mo t an impo, ~ibility. ~ Te,·ertheles:. Garland ~funz's club settled d '·n to hard work and the gigantic task confrontin them at the opening '"hi tle and there will be no let-up until the final o-un cracks • ne. t pnng. _ lake no mistake. Chamt ion i po i­ti\ · h. the team to beat in this '.e ar's Indu ·trial circuit race and the leading cu tom r attraction at the :\orth Third ~treet ~) m, but the Papermakers have e. perienced thi - pre·tigc before when the final result was not alway in ac­corJ. It'~ a known fact that games are ' not ''ron or lost on paper, and \Vith that hought ;n mind Garland . 1unz and hi::. char(Te - can o far thi winter. * \rED ~ -ESD.\ Y, ~ -0\' E~1BE R 24- Champion' pre-, ea ·on favorite va humbled by Herrin<r-Hall in their in­auaural by a omewhat humiliatina .core, 30-23. The Jreen \Vave jump-l to the fore at he arne's outset, but the Hallmen rallied to ake a one oin lead at th half and were never headed thereafter. . 1 erie "Lefty" H ·unner, who. e name "\'e r_JVerlookecl in la:t month' \vriting here, wa the o en~.;i ·e &tar for the ~lunzmen. Brun­n r. \'ho paced the Creen \'ave (Jft­b llen, all ummer offen ·iv ·ly, tos:cu in three bucket for ix print. while ·'Hvbc' Gaine and Earl Farmer sha r­ed a total of 1 0 even 1 y. \'ED. "'E DAY. DECE:\'lBER 1- • Tbe top game c>f the cv ning wa Champion's 27-24 verdict over :\1o~l r. The halftime count v:a 12-7 ir favor of the Safem n, but the lorth B S rcet­er came back . tr ng to ti th core mid vay the fit al p ri d and drew awa ' tcadily to earn the win. Th • • gam wa. marked by th r ·turn to ac-ti( Jll uf ( 1arland \1unz. ~-1unz, am m-bcr of Champion·, 1941-'42 title outfit. oached the l\loslcr entry last cam­paign, but held littl" sympathy for his former mates and shmved it h) regi"­tering 1 J points for the cause of his Champion team. ing P ynter and , am Arnold added six and ftvc point~ . respective! t the Green \Vave total. \ EDNESDA Y, DECEi\IIBER 8- Champion crushed Dixie DeLu,re, who aloncr with Liberty-Economy vva, a late Shop entry and omitted from our list of starters in last month is­sue. The Green Wave ran into com­paratively little trouble again t the Dixie five, running up a one-sided 33-19 score. Every man on the Cham­pion quad-Alexander, Arnold, Bruck, Brunner, Farmer, Gaines, Holcer, Hol­lin, ~1unz, Pawlowsky, Polen, Poynter and Rice-saw action against the Dixiemen. Povnter and Farmer took • down scoring laurels with eight point each, as Champion reversed the usual proceedure on the "Cleaners". * * * * HOW THEY STAND­Team ~V . Estate _____________ 3 Herrina-Hall _______ 3 Champion _________ 2 }vfosler ------------ 2 G.rvtc. ____________ 1 Dixie DeLuxe _ _ ___ 1 Black-Clawson _____ 0 Liberty-Economy ___ 0 L. Pet. 0 1.000 0 1.000 1 .666 1 .666 2 .333 2 .333 3 .000 3 .000 PATIENTS IN MERCY HOSPITAL .. Tovcmber patients in .'fercy Hos­pital were: rv1rs. l\1alvcry ,ib. on. wik of Shel­by Cibson, R. R. 2; frs. Tlild< 1 1icn­aber, wif of i\loysiu'i . ien<lb r, SOY \Valnut Str et; Craham . '1·Farlin, 22S . 1ain Street; Sallie \Vood , daughter of ~lartha \V ods, 333 Race Strc ·t; Deloris Allen, wife uf Bradlc Allen, 813 Laurel Avci1t1e; Cl1 ·stcr ~1un ­ding r, 607 South Fi,rhth Str' t ; L ·s­trr \1i ·Jw L R. R. 6; ~vfinnic l\·1 -­\' horter, daugl1tcr uf I. ·r. ]c\Vh >rtcr, HYJ ,un.lon Av 'IHI ; ;\(.lri· n Phillip ·, 34c) Hano r Strc •t; Jar ·n c Par 1 ·y, s m of Ha vcy Pa r~l ·y, 127 ro rth B Str(:et; :vr rl · \Vi lkins, R. R. 1, kcana, and (;race Kit <JI, v.ifc <Jf \ illiattl Kibon , 535 Luc!Jc,\"v Str · t {21) Garland Munz, all-state center PAUL HAIN AT YALE A/C Paul Hain, formerly of Re­search, has begun his aviation training at Yale l Tniversity. It will fit him as a technical officer of communications, and when completed will give him a second lieutenancy. \Vest Point tra­dition and di cipline are in effect in this school. Paul bas been in Florida for severa l month . Hi wife- Bettv, • formerly -vvas in the mill offices, and she has joined him at New Haven. ALMA MAT.E R SONG FOR B STREET UNIVERSITY Burt vVinterhalter Inspecti n. has omposed a song, t the tune of the Beta Drinkina S n ·, about Hamil­ton Champion, called B treet Uni­versity, for th boys l'l'ho are or x­pect to be in the s rvic ". Here i ~ g es: The memories of B treet l. . Are dear t m and ·ou 0 f k no vledbe we ha v' , ot the best t dear ol' B treet 1 . Th halL, the prof.;;, th dinner rtT<ll \ e never will f rget. \;\'e ~igh, \" • ry when we all think Of lcJvin~ dear . l' 13 Str et U. T'h la~t two line of th ..:e ond ·tanza reaJ: · \V · \. rkt:d, \' s "·ea t but w regr t Leavin(r d12ar ol' B ,tr et 1.J. • • ac 1ne oom ___ _ B". , 111 erl Ba . '1l f! .. Gue \Yh . He i · bi a and fat . . . and j s v r. joilr ... who would play a baH gatT~ . . .. in an alle) .. • H1s t Jen.t at mus1 i very fine . , . playino th~ juke b x bi fayorit pastime ... Hts work o i1 the guitar i pleasan l hea r ... l opie s :ra-r and :::woon and tand u~ to heer. · cg o d lu k t am. the i. ng-inz man ~ ~ " h ba ~ manr a Champwn fan . )) -» {( « '''e can't help but believ that vvhen Harr\' Crammer .::tarts puttin,g t n dol­lar b~ll in beaters., he: reall ,· · n hu-ia .. ti ... but you hould have ~ een !Jim cl.igging for that ten spot wben it got av.;·ay from bim. » )) « « Bob Baker, they tell us ha a '' ay •• • 1 ce a . ut him. H to a. "'how, -see it, th n 2l ·trps tbrou h h ~ s ond ·ho·w­ing until the th a r cl and the · m~nao- r ' ak s him up. Bob e.·plain h slept h r uO.h the sho and u ually gets a ass for the ne ·t attracti n. It v\· rked nee .! )) )) (( (( ''L a:y tho e shotgun ' d wn, boys", ~ a th theme song of the cott nta.il s, but hort g of shel:lf' didn't bother Dwight R iley; he clubbed 'em. Then ' irpo made an error and shot his dog. )) )) (( (( Digging into the records I find that our boys in this room have workr:d here a combined total of 754 years. And our appetites send $57.60 a week to the cafeteria. o es __ _ By .1/m~ab el Nolting Arriving· or leaving? V\ ell, the an­wer to that eems to he leaving, the Ii.st of farev:reH gro~ ing longer and longer.. E elyn Sloneker left to join her bu band 1n Texas, and Kathleen Landrum '\·ent to Arka nsas to join her hu band. Esther Holden has gone down to Fort McClellan, Alabama, to be with Glenn, and Fra11ces Rents-ch­ler has gone all the way out to Oregon where her husband i stationed. Champion has n o more contribu­tions to the Waves-Ruth Powell of Accountinc and Mary Ellen Schwing of ScheJu ling have el nn.ed the 1avy Blue and are aU set co release a man for active . ervice. )) )) « {( The former H elen Sayers of Sal s bas 1eft us to become 'frs. Bernard Graves. The weddin ook place on Thanksgiv,: ng Da . )J )) « « Big evem in Ha.milton was the pl ay., 'Tbe Drean:'l of a CJ wn' , jn which w re b1ll d some of 'U r Cham pi uns. Alex Thomson was a b a rtif ul blush­ing bride, with Harry Hen on of th Print Sh p a one of his A ower girl s. The part of th t ypical husband ' was flOrtra yed by Bill Creagmile of Sale , :and ana Pratt, al o of Sal ,s, W ' i. tb.e grandmother £ the bride. Kenn th Fai, t played _{r . Ro< cvelt E erdt Hall . wa a colon~d hep-cat, and Bud Pratt wa a v rv love! bride maid. Th play a a grea. succe , and the proceeds went to worthy causes. )) )) (( ( ( Several new girls who have joined our Champion family are . Dorothy Halcomb, Irene Kolb, Norma Ander­son, and Sara Stitzel. Dorothy is tak­ing Fran<;es Rentchler's place in Traf­fic, Norma is working in the Lab, ·sara is in the Billing Department, and Irene .i in the Steno-Pool. )) )) (( (( Third Class Petty Officer Nancy Spoerl formerly of Sales, was home on a 7-day leave lookin:r real snappy in ber avy BJue and GI haircut. An­other Cb am~ ion, vV alter H lzbe raer, formerly Chief Cherni t here, wa home for a few days' leave b al.lS . of tl e d ath of h.is father. )) )) (( « By the way, if Franc s Pflanzer doesn't top re~kni tino- that sw · t r, she isn't oi ng 0 h-av ny yarn left ~ n << « T R " 'J RY H MPI H '1. ER .. ATfA J{- ,_,, .... BY R .BBI'f Dkk B tt ub lu "' ' ZIS \ ith B r Hand . PI· , ~by-p l ay D . c ipt.ion b J e ~1ead n. · (An il!z-tJtrm inn of this netll wa · de~ la yed in tht: rnail to tit editOt' c11ul t ece£1,ed too late- orrv.J arl l oltin. , ,1)1 k I tt · .nd Don Duy ·II o k to the bu:h la ·t ' •, ek tu f rr t out a f w bunnte~. \" anhn coodi· i ns o 1 wh t ham r d ur (22) • h n ·ers usual eces ori<:. · u these h s wer ing . ut o ge big g· me! What Jjd h y care if they only had two sh lls? 1 id i bother C.' 1.:. • that h had a few vi · 1 pa ts mi ssing from hi rifle? firing pin and ri ger mtss­ing.) ... ~ Sir·! Nothing wa.s gojng to damp 11 their ardor! Please note C.W . .N. ca ri ed a rifle! Now there is a SPORTS iAN-fel­l ows~ Welly our boys- spent several hour pokin a round . in brush pi1es, i_ ting on log and talkmg about rabbit stew. They hadn't given up thou h! Right ove.r there was a rabbitty-looking spot. Our heroes talked ver. Then it hap­pened !-Swish ~-There was Mr. Hare right in the midst of our little roup, prar.tically jumping traight up and down looking for an op.enin in the enemy lines. Car.! almo t stepped on him. Don got hi gun tanO'led up in his legs trying to get the bead on the bunny. But Dick-' Dead Eye Dick" - was trick on the qui ger- we mean quiggon the tricker~w ell , he wa fast . Blam! Missed ! The rabbit just wa - n't there. But wait ! Tee concussion had knock Mr. Hare out cold! Grasp­ing this opportunity, Bett rushed for­ward, grabbed him by the neck, and squeezed out his life. \Vhata day­whata experience. The Bert familv had rabbit stew ' la st Tuesday. . •.~.. .. \ GERMAN PRISONER DRAWS PICTURE OF CHAMPION'S SON IN NORTH AFRICA L i ute_nrmt J ht1 Par .ns . :m of Har ld P ~IJ:'Bon , :1 itlwr i ~ht h" s s . 'D ple11 -y f a ti n in this man' ' v r nd had a b.i bit in ·h fri .an campaign. ·tr .B i·?J rte he ~ ptur ~1 :,erman .rna hin.. un, pi ur -d abo , whi h h, w. ' p rmitt i t 1 ·p, sans th b rn11l, by th army. John aptur ·d a numb r of ·rn: an pri on r . Oue { them with tmu Lal capa .ity for drawing mad thi sk"G ·h f tb li t l tenant aft. r the 4ghting \i . over. afety Awards ... afety. award - wer ann unced a' follt ws: Elmer Ebel, a r~"'~cnter ~ h 1 , $15. Put hand rail and rlatform a r - the front of ' kip hoi 'l by b iln house. Je~~e " ' ing. at in \"hit Depart-ment $3. teps instead of bdder at cla . · and calc te bins . :\lan·in Puckett, ... erni-Coa t, $3. Put ~tel'' fr m the size platform t 1h .8 r in back of the t ubsize tank under _ · o. S _ lachine. Ceorge imps ,n, . ·a. 1 Beater , $3. \Yider platform and guard rail on No. 9 SaYe-all line shaft. Roy \Yeb tC'r, Board l\.I achine, $5 . Fasten ladder at back of )Jo. 2 Calen­der n :\ ). ll . lachine for the oileL. Howard Lip ' C( mb, To. 2 .~. l achine Room, $3. Install guard on ma -hine coater chain drive. Floyd Cobb, C l\·1 Shippina, $5. U G mal and female plug on the piling machine in the hipping department and make them of wood plastic or rubbe1. Andre''' Alexander, Sanitation $3. Remove first two '"·a h tand- next to locker room and put \Yood lat floor so men can dry off before oing to locker room. Eliminate Jipping. Ro .· arne , C :\1 Cutters, $3. Put . a guard over the chain pulley on No. 2 Cutter in the Coating :\Iill. Harry Lutkehaus A phalt Depart­m nt. $3. Safety guard on motor b lt and driYe "haft belt in A phalt De­artment. \Y. H. Boyd, Color Room, $3. Cut corners off motor platform on Niagara "creens. econd Floor, Color R oom. L e mitha, _ o. 2 Finishing, $3 . c methina be done about dan erous hot wat r pipe that roes up to Al Rud­dle's off1ee. lOHN A. HOLZBERGER John A. Holzberger, father of Cap­tain \'a] er H olzbergcr, now in the Chemical clivi· ion of the army at Den­ver, Colo., died in 1\iercy Fro pital . · ovembcr 28. Captain Holzb rge i a ch mist and had b 'en in the lab. for many years prior to hi nli stm nt. His father was a form r Hami lt n mayor, a.nd also a f rm r servic di r c­tor. He also leaves his widm lara, another on, len, and a sis er. BORN IN MERCY HOSPITAL Tc l\~1rs. R o c e Elet n, R. R. 5, a on, Frank. To t\1rs. Gilber ~·ya tt, 35 vValnut tre t, a son, Ronald L . To 1vlrs. Ru 11 }...fa gard, 1007 Franklin Street, a daughter, J udith Evangeline. Margaret Mullens e>f C M Sorting. beams with Thompson, left. is 16 and a junior in Hamilton pride when she talks of her two c;rranddaugh- High School. Helen l ouise Dill is 13. and in ters. whose pictures are above. Betty Lou the ninth grade at Wayne Township School. • es 1 on war s The following Suggestion Awards have been announced: Burt Winterhalter, No. 1 Inspection , $3. Put telephone and li ght in No. 1 Inspection office to save space and in­crea e effi.ciency . Charles H olbrock, No. 11 Beaters, $20. Installation of stock line t o save pulp when washing out stock chests in No. 11 Beater Room. Ken Moser, Drum Coat, $5. I m­proved meth od of changing pres rolls on 6 foot d rum. Also $3 . Use Semi­Coat Depa rtment electric jitney to pull wa on bins c f Calc te from Color Room to Bull Pen. Vl. H. Boyd, C M Prepa ra ti on $3 . Change steam 8hut-off valve at f11·~ t fl or agitat r.' . Grov ·r Bn , St "anl Pla nt , $15 . • liminat Lop 1 anels on damp r in t am pla nt an I r ·place with tile. harles Holbr ck, No. 1 t B at rs, $5. Six in h ~to k lin {r rn irc ul at ­ing ~ tuck line at slush he. to '1u 1 JorJa to ke 'l up ircula rion th r ugh J ordan. Or;car Jon c·, Wat ·hman, $3. R ­I ai Rhea Av 'IlUe en a nc . T much of a dr p off which is hard n rubl.Y r. , • arl J, itc, o. 1 tl achin Ro m, $3. Sur esti n for breakin pre su re m head and tt in away from foam and froth when ou can not $ r n ' l k and are by-pa ing screens. {23) Bob Compton, C ~1 Inspection, $3. Use hot plate instead of electric iron when makina plices on rewinders and machine wound rolls. Ken r•/Ioser, Drum Coat, $3. Use a metal pan instead of the heavy paper now being used to prevent grease from d ropping into coating, cistern, etc., on 12 D rum Coater. Geo rge May, Pipe Shop $3. En­d o e copper grea e and oil line in old or conduit pipe for protection. Philip Schneider, Color Room $". Nia ke numb e r ~ more legible on cement t anks on the fi r t floor. NOW IN NORTH CAROLINA P a rk Bat on, f rm rl of the chemi­cal lab. , now Pharmaci ' t Mat , T hird Clas , h s been tr n f rred t I rth a r lina. Hi ' ife, dau ht er f \ Vi l- 1i am \Vi · , -,rind rs ha join d him. They r ,' ide at B uf rt a f w miles [ r m P a rke's ' ta tion. 'Th e hir" i girlhacib " n ntdown to th bro k o fetch a pail { water but slo d gazing at the il v in · -rr am ap­paren t] lo, t in thought. "\Vh< t' · , he ,, . ._\itin ,. fo r ?" askt.:d h r mi tr 'SS, ho a, watcl1in . "Dunno," " earily r pli d h r hus­band. " P rh" p , h ha n\ ~ n a pail­ful she likes yet." By ~ ·_rl y Cobb Thought for tb . month ... rrh e ~ -few '.17. ea r'' b·l l.nm w' ut to~ nio-ht, \ It echo - over land and -ea · \, ith tear and s-mile· and -miles and t ar \Ve liA n ' to it- melody. For whom doe the bell toll? h toll for thee ... and the ... "nd thee. )) » « (( 'rhat do the bov jn the er · jce \vax • • sentimental ab ut? \ ell, ' Cyclin }oe' Creech rites from somewhere in England, ·~lVfy motorcy le is still my first love. I cant wait until I o-et back home a1ad take a long ride on it". » )) <-c (( Cant ym1 just ee Joe, sitting in the addle, surrounded by hi infinite trap­ping~, his fox tails fu rled to the breeze, and 1-vith a 1vide grin on bi v\ ide m-outh., zoomiJ!g do·wn B Street: vV e hope you get to take that r ide sooner than you expect, Joe, and you can start off, if you want to . by riding your · 'cycle through the Bull Pen (which, by the way, is very much qS you left it, although we cant send you a pictu re showing women scraping down the coating tubs). J) » (( (( . Silver-haired Charley Reynolds rang m at 7:40 the other morning, the first time he has been late in nearly 19 years as a Champion. Charley came strrutting through the big Bull Pen door, waved his hat in the air, and smiLed his biggest smile . , cocky a an errant schoolboy. )) )) (( « One of those things that a married woman always views with foreboding ab:n t happened to Don Pierce. He · completely forgot his weddtn.g armiver­ary until his mother called him on the phone sometirn during the clay and broke the news to him gently. He l"t no gra s grow_ under his f · etino- making hasty repa rat1ons. · )) ·)) « ({ Do:n~t forget to write t the boys in the service. · l> )) « (( Ken !vfoser's card number in ·the Champion cl ckhou e 1.67,. ca rr s on.ds exa tly Wllh the number po. ted on his lo · e1 new home. Now if his draft number ~!l · o wa 167 ,~ . ell, that would be Gu-r:,rmg a good thing too far! » • • {( \Vhenever ·you see one of the b y on obb's hi ft gingerl patti ng his · t m:a h and Ji t nin to the pl a sant thum1 ,- u ~u l·n w he' thinking t th night b for Thanks, ivin , when ''1 r n o'' J hnny terhenson ran down . s veral young fryer ' on hi · farm, in~ du l 1rs. Hos kins to fry them, a nd treated th bo ' t bicken and m e ch.i ken. )) )) (( (( \ i itor from the service ranks ... N n other than P fc. Elmer Newkirk, e.·-bo-s of th e· Bull P en, home on a furlough, vvho stopped to chat a whil e. .. . Th_e 'Duke" was the same quiet, easy-gomg fellow, 1ooking lean and hard and ' ridy for a fit", as the boys say ... Al Starrman, back from th.e Great Lakes, singing the praises of the great Illinois training center and the Navy in general .... Once a Navy man, always a Navy man! ·. )) ) ) (( (( Hobe vVeaver sa_xs ~hat everyone expects you to stub your toe occasion­ally; but no one will excuse you fm los ing your balance. » » (( « Marvin Hacker has duly butchered­" them hogs" (350 pounds apiece), has made sausage, and rendered lard, and what hav\ you! And now we'll leave i ~ up _to you to do something about get­tmg lllVJted out to dinner this winter. D » « « La~( ~uc~ , cu~n ed her back on big J ack WtFJ.dy Gtllum along about t he week end of December 4. On the 4th, the 200-pouncl softba lier received his notice of recla ification to 1-A in the draft. On the 5th . his 7-year-old boy was taken to the hospital with a se ere injury .to his right eye. B ~ b Weaver's boy, Ronnie, wi ll be k , 1111a t.he . orth ~nd neighbors . awake -rlu Wlllt "r wttl th s.e so:ur notes Ol?- his n v trump t. Ronnie is pre eedm 0~1 rh theory of fir t learn­wg to to t tt loud- tnen l€ rnin t t t it ! . bl)((( Alta~ ac H skin ' j . h help · D ~ · aylor on O.c th'ta . has a . hicv d be al tha . all men dre m f f " · e au in. e eral time h ha~ be n mrstaken f r her hu ban t' . daug1lter rather th n hi wjfe! Looking ahe d-F ~ d "\' lk r wi ll plant au, acre of gardeu on hi country (24} • place next pring with the help of his husky children. · }))}(((( bi hand to one of the 5 ;vellest f Uaw we kn w- and ~rve do m.ean Har lcl · oe, .night superintendent of the coating mill. » ,)) « « . B n 1 ·irks' idea of an unhappy man 1s a fellow who for years has been liv­ing in the Y. M. C. A. and eating at J oe's Chop House, gets invited out to a snm.ptu us home-cooked meal-and is forced to pass it up in order to work vertime for his buddy. (Buddy, did you say ?) » )) (( (( ''Bronco'' Johnny Stephenson has great fa ith in animal nature, as well as human nature. When Johnny goes home to his lonely fa rm at night and rounds up only 2 cow for milking in­st ead of 4, h~ says, "Oh, well, they just went for a httle walk. They'll come ba ck tomorrow." (And they dol) )) )) (( « Buffing the drum ... Hobe Weaver wasn't fooling when he aid he could sight along the barrel of a shotgun wirh the best of them ... He took to the no rth ~rn Ohio fields early, and blasted .cottontails and pheasants right and left ... We knew s~ort, stocky Dewey Tay1or was a Trojan for work but when it comes to building your' own house ... T hat ma n, what he did l ... Lizzi e Allen ofte.t;l wears a big~ wide straw bonnet to wmk, and she al·ways wears a big wide smile beneath it . .. You wouldn't recognize superintendent J oe Piggott at ease in his office without his inveterate pipe . .. Probably has a drawerful of 'em-a la Chri toph "r Niorley . . . A fellow you enjoy meet­ing eveFy day is printer Chad y :rlae - er . .. Cha dey puts a smi le into every ofte of the s h ~ ts he print , even though he may come up with CrO\ f et. Cre - i ,e , and Streaks. , )J U {((( P. S. Whe11 th ey · sk us how we like the new b · . ' job w quickly. point out that the mail:'l diff renee is that now we riner qut ur card on Board 5 inst ad of B ard 4 . . . That is h only r> 0n that w got the j b was be au"e e r - body el· · went t . th · army ... An l our own dra ft number .i: 901 .. , It's a gr at li f:•, i{ you don't w ak n .! JOHN WAYNE FOSXBR J hn \Vayne Fo ter s n of Mr. a,nd :Mr. Kerro.it F st r, 601 Prytania 1\. enue, died in }' mt Ha.milton Hos­P, ital on De -mber 4 aft r l'l illnes f a few days . His ta thler i on No. 2 Re-winder-. He al o leaves #:\ brother, Dale~ oom __ _ Hot Off t lze Drv-crs - b1- • D RJf During th " month we again were remcmhered b,· a number f th b y in the armed ·for e..; who dropped ·in \rhil' on fu rlough. \Ve ar sn rcl_- olad to sec them and to hear of their x- • l'enen, · e~. Dnn Schmccr, forme rly of ~o . 11, now i: in Colorado helpin o- tf l reak in mules f r arm,· ~ervi ce . \'ond r if • he \ cr 't bt: in the 1\ 1adi .. n ,' 1u rc ] _ Jc< after the \Yar follm~;in .., his ncvv e.Tt'ri nces in mul' ki nning. R ay F\an:;, ::.-on of Frank, in the ai r c rps <l t r e\- \Ye=-t. ba , had hi s .:- ha re < f thrill:. Ray \-acr. in fro n1 Camp Lee, \ ·a .. took hi ,' wife and daugh ter back \i h him. Dick . Ianin, \·cte ran of GuaJakana l. :topped off on hi.: round ahl ut \ ·ay from Fort Br, gg. :\ . C. , to Camp Pi ckett, Va. Jack.,on ~I u llin s came in for a sh ort . tay fr m Camp \Y oltcrs, Texa __ )) )) « ~\~ ' eral of tlw o-i rl on \Yet End Con­trol tr< ,-eled. . 'ora Gabl ard vi ited her husband at F ort Rile,·. K.an., and Ollie Hen:slc · \·ent all the.wav to Cali - - . fornia to :ee her b tter half. Betty Baker. \Yhite \Yater. pent four day at Roanoke, \'a.. :\·ith her hu band, and the \Yhite \Yater office wa a d omy place while ~he wa a\J ay. )) J) « « Late Fla:h ... France Gambrell ha - worked three month now without ·allin ' up to ,a he , 'a ick . A record . )) )) (_( « _ 1r . Geor rc Hively and )v1r . Ray­mond Cordrev went to Hou ton where Raymond, at· our Hou. ton plant, un­derwent an peration. H e i- rec ver­ir- fr nicely. )} )) (( (( it anJ th · burn d tvvu ac re' f a ne before th 'Y f un l it. )) )) {( (( Th "li(e )f l r Ril v-l hnYoun :r ~ ~ ent hi - va a tion on !;is fa rm. br ·;tl ·­fa, t in l ed, cl ot h laid out for him , shoe ' shin d and real va l ·t · ·rvicc. )) )) (( (( An l wh ·n Tilford Storm was on hi.· va ·a tion, iL i · reca ll ed t bat a helper on :'\o. 6 gave Zell ers and ~ ·I oo n c c - , uch good adv ice on th ' grey cord\va in. that Tilford \Va · extremely happy. )) )) (( (( \Ye' re due for a new sign on th Beater ·. B b Zellers r ccntly s ld an ov rc at b_ rutting up a noti e but I under:tancl he will be adve rtising for a new pair of pa nts a hi. got ery sh iny \YhiJ e at the ~• .f oo ·e. If you rot pant to fit, better co ntact Bob. - )) )) (( (( 11arvin Haye , Semi-Coat , went to th e Na y December 6, so move over Blevins for another ail or. Cia renee Steelman i back with us. To Blevins -It look like the second assi tant for this column had better be getting in tune, for the time is ure drawing near for thi pencil pusher. )) )) (( C( Sure sign of winter-Leo Winkler r~port that AI Anderson is sharpening b1 lawn mower. Al ha a pond in his back yard, fu ll of frogs. When the pond freezes, the legs of the frogs tick up o Al j u t gets himself a me s every few day ·. • • • I HIS IH Two men in the South Pacific: PFC Wilson Browning, brother of Lawr ~ nce Browning, Color Room, and Pvt. Robert Homaby. Hu nte r s-~1ac Borden came back with a th ree lerged rabbit . .. the bun­ny as kin . for a handicap but J. lac re­fu ing to give it . . . Ha rry ... ·ighting mistook a cat for a rabbit and . hot (at) it and he can ~'rill ee that cat going over th e hill . .. Bill ~1arvin bas turned Scot and queaky , he hot dur­ing a whole afte rnoon on one hell. )) )) {( (( \Vishing th at you and your are now enj oying and •.vill continue to enjoy a happy and prosperous New Year. 1944 i the year of Viet r . . I erie \' ilk in , \' et EnJ Control, lc1~t ontrol CJf hi. ca r recently on the ' .1V to hi: hmne in Ok ana . It went into a ditch and . 1crlc w ·nt t() \1ercy Ho l ital f Jr fn Jr day:- . B ) llenry Alexander ) )) ( ( (( f al l th k own u-··atm ' Il t. fr;r cc ,rn,·, S1 eeJy 1 Tttcr I ·. c1 vc an award fur the late t~ · a n dl ap ·rin r th ' Il1. It i t rlle, (J help me. 0 y ~ . . 1r-.. l ·n 1 made tl e \'oman'. Honor RcJll a th · _l oose Hov lin t Alley anJ p rhap ~ , · pe J y \ ·li cyc ~ tha t he ·c m will be abl to bowl ltke hi \ifc bv k · ing hi · corn. lm\·n. · » )) (( « H nr} r eith, ld P ~q ·r , i. on hi va cat icm in 1 .- ntucky . HoJ e h h ri ng: hi - . it a.'c bac . R ·n,embc t th at ·h n h · wa · h r las tim . h · lo. t \ 7itb th holiday s a n at an end , \ 'ic CotJd ri h n w i, try in to 1< :e : ( m ()f th at xtra w ight he put on; 1f he cou ld onl y trand r some f that h i rht to u , w ,'d he bctt r sati tdied. )) )) (( (( \Ve re r ·t ted to bid Bob Srou f c o i by· f r he d urati on. 1 ol , v ho ·om tim . a r bo ught <t littl · a '!'('a n the \!1a on Read wl t· r he lXHtld ·njo his bobby of raisin r chic en: and . traw­h ·rric , "ith l1i" wife and t\'o child1 ·n, cnt red th · n ·icc ea rl y in Dt.: ember. )) )) (( (( :\f c c ,n ~i d ·rahle di ~ u~: ion , th · Room l1a l ·cid ·d th at Paul ~ a rrctt n igl t b · able tel juin tb \'av ' . . )) )) « (( \' ·lcom ba k to Bill Ha rJ ·b · k (25) anJ the 2'" po 1nd · he gain d during his a r's ab, en c. )) )) ( ( (( Sine · draftin of fath r ' in re ent month s, \VC h·1 c lecid d that an ex­p ·tant father is ne who xp ts noli · from hi - dnft b , rd. )) )) (( ({ l n rabl it row- Butch ~fanrin .-its on stump and kno ·k ·em o er as they run past ... Cu lg r lark ju st ~ hoot t< sc · tb m run fa : t r ... Tb n \'i ·k docs a j >b like kn ·kin r the maple , ma b t tt r. » )) « « • \Yith l n ·l',, m ri ht behind u ·, '"''e \ant t . ay g dbye fl)r momh- nut f r the d11rati n, ·ct. a E 15 • ton • amt ISIO Expressions of Division, Appreciation From Champion Armed Service of Our • In the Men, Canton Country \re re ret v r1· mu h that v e do not ' haYe pace to publi.J1 even the ist of the many ·letter " -hich we received durin the pa t month, from Champion men in the Armed Service, Canton Di i;::ion expressing appreciation for the Christma boxe- ent to them by T he Champion P aper a nd Fi bre Com­p a rty. A1 o for T HE Loc} pocket piece, s tationery, etc. H owever , we are pub­lishing the names of tho e from whom we have received an acknmvledgement . The following letter which we receiv­ed from one of the boys, is typical of them all,- therefore, we a re publishing it b ecause it i rea lly a gi t of all the let t ers received from the boys in the • er ICe. Time out on the desert to .read "The Log''. Pvt. A. C. Rickman in "Death Valley Desert" in Callfornia. D ear ir: R eceived the Chri stmas box a few day ago, also a package of stationery and 1 HE Loc each month. For these things which means so much to us in the service, thanks a lot. It's really wonderful the way Cham­pion throu gh its leaders are standing behind the boys in the service. So far I have met no one whose Company, t hey worked for before they- entered the se rvice, is doing as much for the men as Champion. • V\ hen I have read THE Loc throu gh, I place it in the " Day Room," and most a ny t ime I go to the room I find ome one readin o- it.-It is serv ing a great pu rpo e. Thank for eve ry thing. Pvt. __ ____ ___ __ - - - - - The following i a li t f t ho e fr m \,~' h om \1\f C have r c iv ed lett er ' inc t he publi cation of the D ec n bcr i"SU )f Tn . Lo : E. . ud er, .I<. 2/ C San 'rancisco, ali£. apt. eorrye F yder Orl ~ ndo, •la. Cpl. \ i!Tiam D onald.:on C/ P .~ .. 1. ,'an Fra nci: ·o, Calif. S. F. i\'1 oJ .. y, lJ. S.. . R. Pvt. ]:.lm r p , rl er / l .tv1. ~cw )rJc: n l 1. D ·w ·v J .• -'L eu·a If ' PO " n · ranci sco, ali f. P t. 1 r •n(· E. ,r 'f!( T. r rt I li ss, T . ;:i • P 't. R lph B. \'\' tight · IJadi, on, \Vi, r. P ~:t. \1 ark lVf. J on e~ PO "' mf Po1k L . H zel am y, . I · 1L "J re m·illc, .. . . Lt. ,V. C. hapm n (26) • APO New Orleans, La. P v t. P aul E. Bumgardner C/ 0 P .M. San F rancisco, C alif. Jim Coleman APO San F ranci co, Calif. H. C. Holcombe, M .M. 2/ C Fleet P ost Office, New Yo rk Pvt. Guy G. Wright APO N ew York Pvt. Glenn E. R obinson APO San F ranci co, Calif. Thomas S. Atkins, U .. N .R. Fleet P ost Office, San Franci co T /Sgt. Lindon H. Robin on APO N ew York Pfc. T roy R ob1n on Fleet P ost Office, New York Pvt. A. C. Rickman F o rt Blis , T exa Za ne Hall E.M. 2/ C Fleet Po t ffi ce, w 7 rk A/ C Rc be rt 1L all ] one } ield , B nhan T xa Loga n R obertson , 1st Lt. f.C . ta ti on H o, p i tal Di ll Fi lei F la. P vt. _!Jar I·. tledfor l Lm ry .I• i ld, Denver, ol . · t . J hn E. g lill APO e,i\. Y r k, N. Y . P v t. Jam ~ R . Sharp l i., W l\!fn j J. B. ,, -· h~~e, F I Yle t P . t Illc ., 1e\ Yo rk l. Ha r lcl L::t rcn - Drt'\ b cld . f la. Sot. T. !\.. H a rgr · t~ H u nt r F i ld, Ja . Pvt. Ha rry V 1• Snyckr Po ·tma stc r. w Y rk . I S R n a I l W. R u -11 TuLa, Olla. P t. Larkin Al.l en Pc tma,' t r, · w Yorl" ~ _,,n]c ibb . . .R. .dington, Va. Cpl. Cha . B. Gr · ory .AP _ re\· Y rk fohn H. \"bitted i'demphi , T nn. Larr: H. aglc Flee · P. . an Franci.,-.v J\Iaj r \ alter . Cath y d \ rood · r~ ·~ nal. Id. Cpl. Ed\ ard Du b T rth \.<Lhjngton, D. E. B. L athen";ood .1r1.l\IL 1/ J · nacos tia. D. C. Lt. E. J. illi spie C/ 0 P. 'I. San Fran .i co, . alif. L:t Lt. \' . \~T . per AP ew York . Y. ._ /''gt. ebal Burn tt P N ew York T/ 5 G. Reno APO L cw York / Sgt. Jam ~ E. Le ter Dalhart Texa Pfc. ~ Iorri L. Kell ·, Jr. APO Ne, York Pvt. Fred Crane APO ~e, York Cpl. J. T. '"' math · r APO ~ew York Pfc. Edward F. vVilliam Amarillo, Texa orp. \V. D. Robert on 1 1orfolk. V a. Cpl. Glenn l\IcDm ell .. taten I ~ land , 1 • Y. Lt. Earl A. Cabe Richwood, Va. A/ S Gro'9" r D. Ric , ASN 14188243. South Hall Sq., I. 317lh C.T.D., (Air Crew) Flight A, Mon­. na State Un1\'ersity, Missoula. Montana. Gro • er is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert F. Rice of Beaverdam Road, Route No. 1. He is now taking a college course at Montana State Un1- eraity. He was an employee of Champion helore enter-in9 the Army Air Corpa Jut D•· cembttr. Pf . 'tc ·e :rvr. '1 r n . 0 T >W Y rk .pl. H arold Pr ' sJ y .P C\ Y rk pl. c rg vV. , math "rs p v - orlr T / 5 . , arb r 1gh P I ew Y rl· Pfc. e il ll ··tt . PO amp Beale, alif. / Eldridg H olland o 'i ·a T 'as Sa. Jam B. Hurl y PO ew Yorl L. R. Stil , l.l\ r. 2/ I rf )lk, Va . ' gt. Chari s \V. lolc Parri Island, S. C. ' Pfc. Elb rt . Carpent r Los nu "le , Cali f. Pvt. J. C. Parker, ASN 6290062 E. Troop 12th Cavalry A.P.O. 201 c/ o Postmaster, San Fran­cisco, California. Son of Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Parker. Pfc. E. B.. ,uy Occansid , alif. Pvt. ( ,ay W. Ovv ·n Cam Hood , Texas • arr ·tt Reev s Smy rna , 'T nt . PvL. Jan s R. ' tam ·y Jre ·n vi ll , Pa. 'taff Sf . • r dricl· J. Tranthar J ( 'amp d, ir, · regon Pvt. \,' i 11 i a Ill ' . John n1 \-}or ,. rk. Pvt. ~1 a uri t - foore \ · t ) er, 1 d. P ·t. Eu en V\ an n f•t. J ack on,.'. ' . How- d 1 ild r s_, J .~·f. 2/ an Fran ·i o, · lif. l v. lu · R.Hane Lincoln, ebraska (27) Pfc. Cecil D. Collette, A.P.O. 263, Camp Beale. California. Pfc. Collette was formerly employ­ed in the Soda Sulphate Department. S t . Charles Best Grand l .land Neb r. Sgt. Harry S. Crumley Topel a, Kan, as A/S Ray Wilson Northfield. Vermont J Cpl. Craig K. Reeves . APO San Franci co A/C Francis M. B e r ' . Jr. Seymour Johnson Field ~ - C. Pvt. Thomas G. Allen APO San Francisco Pfc. Rex D. Iitchell K ey Field, ~r[i s. / Cpl. Rayburn E. 1 1 ffitt _ r w Orlean , La. ' gt. J a me ~ F . Devlin Sh re port, La. Pvt. T. J. tam y ymor John , n Fi ld) J. • C. pl. Da . Iann Camp Bre 1r nriclge, K y. Pvt. Sam \V. l imi on P an F r a ,; c i .· · , ali f. : gt. J. R. I D \ · ·ll J\ PO hr port, La. Pvt. Lad li Kino- Ta ·orna, \Y a, bin"'ton ' I t. fohn . l ra k , r sf r fi .ld 1i:s. t. . L. \Vilcy • C:1n1.1 Buvvic, Te:-.. . L F'-irbroth r, L .. 1T.R. hark ton ... ·.C. Pfc. Jl·nn I. i rad • Y 'e~] ·r Fi ld, ~li " . har1c · F. obin: m, 1/ ; '\ Orl ·at s, La. I hn r L Barn s l <1 pta in Air rp . 'ummandin r, ~ liami ) a h •111. f . L H. .. etz r M ·hanicsburg, P . • Pvt. Clifford G. Jones. Btry. D. 14th Bn. 5th Reqt. FABTC. Fort Bragg, N. C. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Jones. . '/S t. F. J. Trantham Camp ;\dair. Ore?On Cpl. Zeb H. 'mith Camp Adair. Oregon Cpl. ] . B. Hill, Jr. Texarkana. Texa ' Lt. Fred B. )Jitchel[ Camp 'ibert. Ala. S 't. J. C. Holland Quantico. \ ·a. Pn. 1 ames Parker ' Camp ibert. Ala. T/~ S. B. Scarborou~l1 ' APO. 'ew York,.-. Y. S/ 'gt. H enry B. Farmer Fort :\Iyer · , Fla. Pn. Cay \Y. Owen :'\orth Camp Ho d, Tcxa: T /S t. B. H. Trull Camp Pinedale. Calif. Cpl. \'illi · \ '. ,'etzer Oklahoma Cin. Okla. l .t. B. D. Oshc~rne . 'onh Cllarle ... tun, ,·.C. .'gt. "ar l :\ .Setzer Camp Lee, ·a . Pfc. I r llu.! R. Plernmons For J a b.nn. . C. Lt. :\1. F. Heah ' •. alina. h ·nba r fl~ . \ r r· ' • . . ' • • • t:L .\PO . ew York .. Y. r l. I· .. ther .'matl1~r ... Ft. ~J yer, \ a. P \ t. J an t · 0. B [a I (lc k Fort Bennin ', (,;. ~ Fr. nk Clontz .\P . ~ \-\York, -. \ . L . P ul ~. L rk .\PO • . \ York, •. Y. \ f/ ~ 12 t. F. 1. J a c oc b. .I r. :\P \..,,. York, :\ . Y. p, t. I . J l. Cuf lrth ( ;reern ill'. ~ [i:od. l'n. Charlie ~I. J nncs \PO , \.'w York, . Y. Pfc. Cmmer Ll' · 'ris ~) ~C\' r i\ cr, ;\. C. Cpl. Cron·r T . .\Lallncy .\PO ... c\1.: York, \. Y. I fc. ceil D . Collette Camp Beale, alif. Pn. Kline Z. l\Inor · Cam ~) 1\laxey, T exas Cpl. J oseph E. .'crogu· Salin.:~. r an~as Pfc. Paul Buchanan. son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Buchanan. He is stationed at Blackstone. Vir­qinia. Lt. T. R. \"e;tmon:lanJ Orl ·min. Fla. Cpl. Rn} H. P wn (JII:lntllu. \, . ' , . Ch· ~lt· 1 .. Gilli (amf H J i~-. Tc , :-. \ ; R. T. Rickard ( ·uert,, Te:u Pft. t'l t . L. hq 1 rd . .I r. ( J fl't I \ I !. . f L . C. '1 . It 1 ri on C<J T e~ vi II c K n . Lt. (j_) f· red I. Fn.:u 'n • · n }· r .1 u~ i : l .tl i i. P\t. R ~ IJ h H. r <• err·< n ke.n ii•,. C,l;·_ P\t. J l f-...1 k.r ttric · C mJ \ hct'l r. ; . Rv.· t.: .\P·o . · Yor · •• ·. r. 8) Pvt. R(Jb · rt l\. Hi1 rs CamJ \lack·ll . 1 . C. S/SI!t. Cha . f . Ia rk Peter ·nn Fi ·ld, Colo. I fc. Clarence Cathev amp ( ;orclnn, Fla. c.\". n (Jhn. clahl 'urtis Hay) 1\Id. Sgt. F. \V . • ··wrnan Charlc tun, S. C. Cpl. Edward Bell Quantico. a. T/5 Jarnc ~ B1rcll ' APO ~ 'ev; Yurk, . ·. Y. 'pl. Chas. B. Cre)!ory APO ~ew Yurk. '\. ¥. Lt. J. 1. Bl ythe l\1axw , ll Field, Ala. Sgt. Geo rge 0. Frady Malden, XIo. Pfc. Charl es F. King Camp Aclair, Orerron Two inmates of an asvlum had been given a hammer and on~ nail. One of the inmates had placed the nail head fir t ao-ainst the wall and started ham­merino-. eeing that he v;a rettin no app:ecta b le re ults, he aid to his corn­pan ron: "The bird who made this nail i ,: crazy. He put the point on the wrong end." The other replied, ''You're the one that's crazy-this nail oes in the op­posite wall.'' '·People vote their resentm nt. not their appreciation. The a\·eragc man doe: not vote for an) thincr, but a~ain t ~- ·omething."-Wi//iarn Bennett .llu.nro. Pfc. Harry Holland., son of Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Holla.nd, Newfound St. Hury ia. aomewhet• oventu. BROTHERS SERVING OVERSEAS Cpl. Wilford L. Hicks and Pfc. Mills Hicks, Jr .• sons of Mr. and Mrs. Mills Hicks, are serving with the U. S. Marines somewhre in the South Pacific. Wilford is serving with the mechanical detach­ment and MUs, Jr., with the weapons division. Champion Y and Canton Playground Sports ___ _ By C lzarl es ~~fu nd ay Basketball Our ba ketball ea,.on opened _ ro­\ ·emb r 27th \ ·ith . I J( re General Ho - pital pia~ inr.r here, vCore being Cham­pi n Y 4 · and. Iow·e ;eneral 36. The \ \'on over Brevard College "1 to 27 and 64 o 22. \Ye al o '\'(Jfi over Po tal .\cct . Divi ion 62 to 2 . Y t am lost tO Jrade'rg- 43 to 4 7 and to wannanoa 42 to ". ] h · ~Sir!~ am pened their a on with . he' ille \ 1ictor ·team and lo, 1 to 22. 1 hey \ r n over Po tal . \cct'-. Di\·i, iou 41 to 19. A }fJt of in­t ·re_ i hown in ba k ·t ball thi y ar a1 d \ ha ·e had r'>n gr..1od crowd~ ou tJ e h · arne.. The ch clule { r t I ~ r · m a i n de r ( > f the e a on i ~ ,~Si v <; n b ·low. \ c \'ill have s··veral m Jf l,iime tn add to the ~irl~ hedul · and a ·A'· to th ~ n1en. . a Ill da , l an. 1 : (1 h · r , Cham-pi• ill ) v .'Dunn· . 1 ill 1re ·nvill ·. . londay, J ~ n. 3: (Her·), balllpion Y \ . A_ ~ \'in , , A 1 ·vill . 1 Lh:: '-O a.'. .J an. 4: · h · n ) , I ion \ v . _ lor •an , ci: o., \ill . ham­he- ... <t t u r d a . • T an . : n . I ) ' c km pi () n Y . I utin: ~ I ill , Ct e ·n ·ille; 'ham-ton 1 (;ir} \' . I· nk· CiJis. r u da J<n. 11: ('lhu-e) h n-i n Y v . Po 1 . c-t . Di\ i icm (l >th B '" < nJ .~i rl ) . f'rida\, J~ 1. 14: ('rl1er ), Y Servic· Club v··. L·th·1 Boy.· 'h~mpi n Y Cirl · . n L11 ·1 irl . Saturday, Jan. 15: (There), Cham­rion Y v . Graderrg Co., Asheville. aturday, Jan. 22: (There), Cham­pion Y . l\ Ionagahn Mills, Greenville. Tuesday, Jan. 25: (There), Cham­pion Y v . AACS \iVing, Asheville. aturday, J an . 29: (Here), ham­pion Yv·. \Veather \Ving Greer, S.C.; Champion Y Girls vs. Cant:on Hi h Girls. Ion day, Jan. 31: (Here) Cham­pion Y vs. Swann an a All-Stars . , aturday, Feb. 5: (There), Cham-pi n v . Asheville ch ol. \Y dn . clay, Feb. 12: (H ·rc), Ch, m­piorJ Y v. ~Jars Ifill lleg'; Cham­pint Y (Jirl v·. 'anu,n I li rh ,irl •' . Y dne day, F·b. tr: (ll ·rc), ham­pirm \ V">. I ():.1 al Acct. Di v i ~i(ln, Ash·­\ ill , (Both \1en ar d Cids) . I· rid;:ty,