Southern Appalachian Digital Collections

Western Carolina University (20) View all

Spinning wheel

Item
?

Item’s are ‘child’ level descriptions to ‘parent’ objects, (e.g. one page of a whole book).

  • Although the exact origin and who used this particular spinning wheel is unknown, it is typical of the type of spinning wheels used throughout the southern Appalachian mountains during the 19th century to spin wool and cotton. This spinning wheel is also known as a great wheel or wool wheel. Powered by hand or by a special device for turning, the wheel rotates a spindle via a belt or rope. The spindle is a metal spike and is attached to the head by two leather straps. A corncob covers the spike end from which the wool is spun off by hand. The head is held to the wheel's base by a wooden screw tension device that tightens or loosens the driving belt. This spinning wheel appears to be handmade, however, the wheel itself is made from wood that is entirely different from the rest of the parts which may indicate that it was replaced at some point.
Object
?

Object’s are ‘parent’ level descriptions to ‘children’ items, (e.g. a book with pages).

  • Although the exact origin and who used this particular spinning wheel is unknown, it is typical of the type of spinning wheels used throughout the southern Appalachian mountains during the 19th century to spin wool and cotton. This spinning wheel is also known as a great wheel or wool wheel. Powered by hand or by a special device for turning, the wheel rotates a spindle via a belt or rope. The spindle is a metal spike and is attached to the head by two leather straps. A corncob covers the spike end from which the wool is spun off by hand. The head is held to the wheel's base by a wooden screw tension device that tightens or loosens the driving belt. This spinning wheel appears to be handmade, however, the wheel itself is made from wood that is entirely different from the rest of the parts which may indicate that it was replaced at some point.