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Mary Stringfiled to her son William W. Stringfield, November 21, 1864, page 1

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  • My dear son Willie Emory VA – November 21st, 1864 Your letter came Saturday 19, and was gladly received I assure you by your mother, who never forgets you, or any of my dear absent children, or relations, your letter to Mrs [V] has been received and answered and last nights mail brought one from you to Mary, which she has just sent over and I have just read, along with one by the same mail from, Preston Blocker. Yesterday the 20th, and the Sabbath [Tommy] brought me a letter directed to Saltvile and to the care of Frank. I cannot, nor need I try to express how I felt at hearing once more from my very dear and only sister. The letter was from Annah Jones who you know holds the pen of a nady writer . She said they were 18 miles from home at the Breckenridge springs in Panola county Texas, living in camps along with her mother, Nelly Parker with her two children, also Livvy Blocker, whom Preston had just brought and left after staying some time himself, both himself and wife were just recovering from a spell of bilious fever. Mr Jones had three tents made for the three familys. This was in August when Annah wrote, she left Lizzie Salewiles wife, [Luzine Bryson, Laura and [Vincler] Booth, Mr Jones cousins, whom you may have heard of in some of Annahs letters several years ago, who lives with them all at home with himself sending them provisions and occasionally going himself. My dear sister was improving in health and spirits since she had been at the springs. Annah was just recovering from an attack of fevers when she went. They intended to stay until frost. My sister received my letter to her written in January before I left [town] so did Mary Blocker, also one written to Mary since I have been here, which gave them much joy to hear we were out of the enemy lines, and that I was so comfortably situated with my children here. GOD be praised for all his mercy to me and friends “for surely goodness and mercy has followed me all my days.” Preston says dear (located sideways along top of page 1): PS give my love and kind regards to squire Gaines and his lady and Mrs Brandon Singor also to Mr Wilkerson and wife likewise to Col Thomas its beginning to snow. Linda has (not legible) turned and she and Callie send a message of love to you your mother as ever M V S
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