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Kezia Stradley Osborne to Roland C. Osborne, March 16, 1862

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  • In this letter of March 16, 1862, Kezia Stradley Osborne describes to her husband, Roland C. Osborne, her efforts to have a portrait of their son made and apologizes at length for the burdensome tone of her previous letter.
  • March 16, 1862 Asheville NC March 16th ‘69 My Dear Husband You see I have moved at last. I came here to Sis Ruth’s last Tuesday [sic]. I tried to get the baby liking [likeness; likening ?] as I came through but the artist was not ready and it has been raining every day since so that I could not get up I am afraid I can’t get it in time to send it to you. I will keep trying since I came here Judson went to Father’s after me to take me to Haywood. He got my trunk and brought it in here but it was raining so that I could not go with him. He said he would send Mingus next week. I reckon I will go if the weather is suitable and the road so I can travel. I expect Pigeon is up there has been so much rain lately the roads are said to be very bad now. I received yours of the 8th last night. I felt like there was something wrong when I saw so much blank paper, and as I read it down tears gathered thick and fast in my eyes but I forced them back until I went to my bed by my self where I lay for hours studying and crying. I felt like you would never love me anymore as good as you used to do and never want to hear anything more from me. I know it was wrong for you wrote gentle and kind even this time. I do not think hard of you I know that you do not know all. If you did I don’t believe you would blame me so much as you do now. you charge me with noticing little things too much, sometimes little things have sharp points. Don’t you know they have I am only sorry that I did not bear all with out complaining; can you forgive me for distressing you with my little troubles. If I were never to see to you again I never would forgive my self for giving you so much pain. And now I will drop this un pleasant subject. I will try not to distress you with any more complaints whatever I may have to submit to I know you have troubles enough of your own and I would rather try to lighten them than to add to them so I try to bear all in silence. One thing I know I do love you, and my Dear little Rufus, sweet child, he loves his Mama dearly. He is a great deal of company for me. I love to watch his quiet sleep for I know that he feels nothing of the cares of this world of sin and sorrows. He has got one little tooth now. Felay [?] thinks a heap of him. Feb [?] says tell Uncle Roland to please bring him a little knife when you come back. I do hope you will get off in April, and not have to stay for three long long long months more. There are three companies nearly made up in Buncombe for the war I have no news of importance to write and as I feel sorter bad I will quit for this time. My Dear I have not one single un kind feeling towards you I daily pray that the great and good God to spare your precious life and to shield you from all harm and danger and bring you safely back to your unworthy but devoted Wife. You did not say whether you was well or not. You must always tell me for I feel anxious about you Monday morning the weather is still so bad I don’t know whether you need direct to Pigeon or not till you hear if you say any thing about this. Do it on [separate ?] [paper ?] Osborne Civil War letters Annotated versions prepared by George Frizzell
Object
  • In this letter of March 16, 1862, Kezia Stradley Osborne describes to her husband, Roland C. Osborne, her efforts to have a portrait of their son made and apologizes at length for the burdensome tone of her previous letter.
  • March 16, 1862 Asheville NC March 16th ‘69 My Dear Husband You see I have moved at last. I came here to Sis Ruth’s last Tuesday [sic]. I tried to get the baby liking [likeness; likening ?] as I came through but the artist was not ready and it has been raining every day since so that I could not get up I am afraid I can’t get it in time to send it to you. I will keep trying since I came here Judson went to Father’s after me to take me to Haywood. He got my trunk and brought it in here but it was raining so that I could not go with him. He said he would send Mingus next week. I reckon I will go if the weather is suitable and the road so I can travel. I expect Pigeon is up there has been so much rain lately the roads are said to be very bad now. I received yours of the 8th last night. I felt like there was something wrong when I saw so much blank paper, and as I read it down tears gathered thick and fast in my eyes but I forced them back until I went to my bed by my self where I lay for hours studying and crying. I felt like you would never love me anymore as good as you used to do and never want to hear anything more from me. I know it was wrong for you wrote gentle and kind even this time. I do not think hard of you I know that you do not know all. If you did I don’t believe you would blame me so much as you do now. you charge me with noticing little things too much, sometimes little things have sharp points. Don’t you know they have I am only sorry that I did not bear all with out complaining; can you forgive me for distressing you with my little troubles. If I were never to see to you again I never would forgive my self for giving you so much pain. And now I will drop this un pleasant subject. I will try not to distress you with any more complaints whatever I may have to submit to I know you have troubles enough of your own and I would rather try to lighten them than to add to them so I try to bear all in silence. One thing I know I do love you, and my Dear little Rufus, sweet child, he loves his Mama dearly. He is a great deal of company for me. I love to watch his quiet sleep for I know that he feels nothing of the cares of this world of sin and sorrows. He has got one little tooth now. Felay [?] thinks a heap of him. Feb [?] says tell Uncle Roland to please bring him a little knife when you come back. I do hope you will get off in April, and not have to stay for three long long long months more. There are three companies nearly made up in Buncombe for the war I have no news of importance to write and as I feel sorter bad I will quit for this time. My Dear I have not one single un kind feeling towards you I daily pray that the great and good God to spare your precious life and to shield you from all harm and danger and bring you safely back to your unworthy but devoted Wife. You did not say whether you was well or not. You must always tell me for I feel anxious about you Monday morning the weather is still so bad I don’t know whether you need direct to Pigeon or not till you hear if you say any thing about this. Do it on [separate ?] [paper ?] Osborne Civil War letters Annotated versions prepared by George Frizzell