Southern Appalachian Digital Collections

Western Carolina University (21) View all

John C. Campbell Folk School, no. 10 (October 1930)

Item
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Item’s are ‘child’ level descriptions to ‘parent’ objects, (e.g. one page of a whole book).

  • John C. Campbell Folk School published a series of newsletters from 1926 to 1950. Written like a letter from the school's director, the newsletter is a source of information about the classes and activities at the Folk School and their impact on the surrounding community. In this issue, Director Olive Dame Campbell reflects that as the Folk School celebrates its fifth birthday, it is stable, past the "experimental" stages, and has witnessed tangible results of goals. The Mill House is reported to be used for a shop and an "agricultural laboratory" until an addition can be made to the barn. The growth of the agricultural program is evident in the winning Jersey herd and a new brooder house for the chickens. Reports on classes include a new venture of hosting short crafts courses for younger children where Park Fisher led the boys in making tool chests, while Louise Pitman and Jane Chase taught the girls weaving, and Margaret Campbell taught carving, painting, and drawing for all the children. The newsletter ends with a plea for donations for student scholarships. Included are photographs of 'tea time,' the Women's Club, the Log House Museum.
Object
?

Object’s are ‘parent’ level descriptions to ‘children’ items, (e.g. a book with pages).

  • John C. Campbell Folk School published a series of newsletters from 1926 to 1950. Written like a letter from the school's director, the newsletter is a source of information about the classes and activities at the Folk School and their impact on the surrounding community. In this issue, Director Olive Dame Campbell reflects that as the Folk School celebrates its fifth birthday, it is stable, past the "experimental" stages, and has witnessed tangible results of goals. The Mill House is reported to be used for a shop and an "agricultural laboratory" until an addition can be made to the barn. The growth of the agricultural program is evident in the winning Jersey herd and a new brooder house for the chickens. Reports on classes include a new venture of hosting short crafts courses for younger children where Park Fisher led the boys in making tool chests, while Louise Pitman and Jane Chase taught the girls weaving, and Margaret Campbell taught carving, painting, and drawing for all the children. The newsletter ends with a plea for donations for student scholarships. Included are photographs of 'tea time,' the Women's Club, the Log House Museum.