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Interview with Lanie Kear, transcript

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  • Transcript of interview with Lanie Kear.
  • Lanie Kear Interview 1 Name of interviewee: Lanie Kear Name of interviewers: Logan McGhee, Ashlyn Breuer, and Quincy Goldsmith Date of interview: File uploaded October 30, 2020 Length of interview: 8:56 Location of interview: Jackson County, NC Lanie Kear was born in upstate New York and moved to North Carolina at 12 years old. She discusses her coming out story and how college helped her learn more about pansexuality. She also explains the stigma behind pansexuality and the start of Safe Zone Training when she began at WCU. Start of Interview Speaker 1: So, what is your name, what would you prefer to be called in this interview, and what pronouns do you go by? Lanie Kear: My name is Allanna. I'd like to be called Lanie and my pronouns are she/her. Speaker 1: How old are you? LK: 20. Speaker 1: How do you describe your gender or your sexuality? LK: My gender, I identify with my biological... my gender, which was female and is female, and then my sexuality is pansexual, demisexual, technically. So pansexual just means... The way that I base pansexual is basically, I just like everybody. I base people off of their personalities, not based on appearance, gender, or any of those other identifying markers. And then the demisexual means that I only have sexual encounters with people who I have deep emotions with. Speaker 1: Where are you from and how long have you lived in Western North Carolina? LK: I'm originally from upstate New York and then I moved down here when I was 12. I've been in western North Carolina for three and a half years. Speaker 1: Can you tell us a little something about your life as an LGBTQ individual? LK: At first, it was kind of hard, especially when I was trying to figure out what my sexuality was. It was kind of difficult. Luckily I was lucky to come from a very accepting family, and so, she helped me through it and it was really good environment. It's really nice to have that community on your back too. I mean, yeah, there's drama in the community, but there's drama everywhere. Speaker 1: Not wrong. I know a lot of people do have a coming out story. Do you have one or is it that's more of a personal for yourself? LK: I mean, kind of. Technically, I first came out in middle school and I came out as a lesbian. Speaker 1: Really? Lanie Kear Interview 2 LK: Yeah, because I didn't know that it was okay to like more than one gender. I thought it was, you had to choose between one or the other. So I came out as a lesbian. And then obviously when two months later I got a boyfriend, that changed it a little bit. Everyone was super-confused. They're like, wait, I thought you were lesbian. And then like two-ish years into high school, I started like befriending more members of the LGBTQ community. I was part of roller derby that my mom did. And I learned, oh, this is something. So I thought that I was bisexual for a while. I didn't really come out, but the people who were around me, it was general knowledge. And then when I came to college, I learned about pansexuality and was around a lot of people who helped me hone my sexuality, so to speak. Then I technically came out on social media and stuff when I went to Pride last two years ago. I think it was two years ago or last year. And so I technically came out then to all my social media and it's there. So. Speaker 1: Yeah. That's cool. I didn't know that, from that part. Would you say that Western Carolina helped you come out and find your- LK: Sexuality? Speaker 1: ... sexuality? No, I didn't want to say sexuality, but who you really are and just, or would you say that was more of like your friends or your family members? LK: Yeah, I would definitely say it was more my friends and my family members. I definitely feel like coming to college, just in general, being in a different environment, being around different people. That definitely helped my journey so to speak, but I don't think Western itself really did anything. Speaker 1: Since you've been in western North Carolina, what changes have you seen in the LGBT community broadly? How would you as an individual? LK: I mean, are you talking like? Speaker 1: So what have you seen around here or since you've been here, has it been like more of a LGBTQ out. LK: I feel like there might be more people out. I was the first freshman class after Safe Zone training started. So I feel like that made a lot of people in the community feel a lot more comfortable when it came to coming out and talking about their sexuality in class or their gender in class. So, I guess, I've been here from the beginning of the Safe Zone, so they kind of. Speaker 1: Okay. What are some negative experiences you had being a part of this commuwnity? I know we had an interview before, but like, if you want to expand on stuff, you can. LK: I mean, really the only negative experience that I've had within the community itself was a lot of people just think that the pan... On the pansexual side, they just think that you're rude, almost. They feel like you're just trying to be better than the bisexual people and so you identify as pan, when it's not really that. And then when it comes to the demisexual, people are just like, oh, well, you're just hard to please, or they'll call us like... What was it like? Virgin Wanters. We just want people to try harder in order to give it up. So I've been called a couple of those names by some people who aren't my friends, but I mean, that's really it. I have negative influences from outside the community, but that's kind of, unfortunately, comes with the territory. Lanie Kear Interview 3 Speaker 1: Yeah. But coming off of that, what are some positive experiences? LK: I mean, I have a great friend group. Most of the people within my friend group are part of the LGBTQ community. I've also gotten to experience a lot of things I feel like I wouldn't have experienced if I wasn't in the community or at least if I wasn't open-minded to the community itself, so. Speaker 1: I know you explain your sexuality, but do you identify any little subtle changes between broader span, but in the community. Do you see yourself as a promoter or is there something that you identify in the community? LK: I'd definitely say I'm an activist. I think that that's what you're trying to ask. Speaker 1: Yeah. LK: I would definitely see myself as an activist. Even if it doesn't come down to my own sexuality, I very much will go to bat for someone or I will inform people and educate people, so that trying to open people's minds up. And also, I don't keep it a secret. If it comes up in conversation or someone's on my social media and they try coming at me, I'm just like, yeah, uh-huh. What do you have to say? You know what I mean? So. Speaker 1: Yeah. How does the community that you lived in helped you with being a part of the LGBTQ+ group? LK: It's definitely made me more open-minded, especially when it comes to things like transgender. I was raised in the Catholic household. I was raised in the Catholic Church. That isn't generally something that we know about or talk about, and if we did talk about it, it was always negative connotations. But that being in the community and learning and meeting people has broadened my horizon, made me way more open-minded than I used to be. Just little things like that. Speaker 1: Is there anything else would you like to share about being a part of the LGBT+ community? LK: Not really. Speaker 1: Not really? Oh, okay. Great. LK: I don't know.
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