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Horace Kephart to Dillin, May 29, 1924, page 1

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  • ' ,: rr.rT bJ,,.,,..., APPALACHIAN „ FISH AND GAME ooc Association j ~aT HORACE KEPHART. Pm.io.mt . R . .. .' 4-Sft^CsQ^ .-■■-.•- -» ' '•>< STEARNS, Secretarv W. W. WIGGINS, Vice-President HEADQUARTERS AT W. M. HUGHES, Treasurer '"'"-" "; '-,;;:"- ■■ '•' BRYSON CITY.N.c!' fl<*OviS8 & «,&U&ZS • if .j« v-,;^ -A.V ^ ...Wi O .,..4-... -.; ^ »,. w...". ^ .: .*.;...}..*; A^ma i. X * ..*-■.■• ' J ' .' ■ t » «■ v oi May 29, 1924. Dear Mr; Dillin:- I enjoyed your letter, and would have acknowledged it sooner but have been away from home. My remarks about there probably being no specimen in existence of a perfect sp^cimen^of^a colonial or revolutionary rifle that was used for buffalo and elk and Indian fighting on the frontier had those words purposely Italicized to rivet attention on my meaning. The frontier shifted ever westward, of course. At any given time its eastern limit was marked by the localities in which the buffalo and elk and hostile Indians still lingered. In that region they had to use rifles of comparatively large bore, from about .47 to .53 caliber of ball (45 to 32 round balls to the pound). The records of the time say so, and the necessities of the case demanded it. Whelan got an entirely wrong inference from testing your Rosser rifle of .32 caliber (142 balls to the pound) because he took it as an average specimen of the old frontiersmen's rifles, whereas it was a mere squirrel gun. The sharpshooters of the Revolution would no more have used such a gun for big game hunting and war than we would use a .22 rim-fire for such purposes today. And they sure Mike did use stiff charges of powder when the occasion demanded. It makes me sick to have that questioned-by men who never tried it as I myself have done. (Over.)
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